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Douglas Murray

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  • Bloody Sunday: Truths, Lies, & the Saville Inquiry | Douglas Murray

    Bloody Sunday: Truths, Lies, & the Saville Inquiry

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Douglas Murray
    • Narrated By Michael Fenton Stevens
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    Bloody Sunday was the worst massacre of British citizens by British troops since Peterloo in 1819 - a potent distillation of the rage and anguish of a bitter conflict that spanned decades and claimed three and a half thousand lives. In 2002, when the Saville Inquiry transferred from Derry to London, author Douglas Murray began attending daily to hear at firsthand the testimony of the soldiers and members of the IRA who had been there that dreadful day.

    Dr. B. Dexter says: "Amazing book!"
  • Exit Britain? | Douglas Murray

    Exit Britain?

    • UNABRIDGED (19 mins)
    • By Douglas Murray
    • Narrated By Mark Ashby
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    For at least a quarter of a century, there was no greater bore in British politics than the Eurobore, who warned against Britain’s loss of sovereignty to Brussels. From the moment the House of Commons narrowly passed the Maastricht Treaty in the early 1990s, turning the European Economic Community into the European Union, the species could be sighted around Westminster. But its natural habitat became sparsely populated meetings of the already converted.

  • Grim Reaper, M.D. | Douglas Murray

    Grim Reaper, M.D.

    • UNABRIDGED (12 mins)
    • By Douglas Murray
    • Narrated By Mark Ashby
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    Every age preceding ours sanctioned acts that we find morally stupefying. So it is reasonable to assume that there are at least some things we are presently doing - possibly while flush with moral virtue - that our descendants will regard with exhalations of “What were they thinking?” Anyone interested in our age should wonder what these modern blind spots might be - those things akin to slavery or the Victorians’ shoving children up chimneys.

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