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Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills | [The Great Courses]

Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills

No skill is more important in today's world than being able to think about, understand, and act on information in an effective and responsible way. What's more, at no point in human history have we had access to so much information, with such relative ease, as we do in the 21st century. But because misinformation out there has increased as well, critical thinking is more important than ever. These 24 rewarding lectures equip you with the knowledge and techniques you need to become a savvier, sharper critical thinker in your professional and personal life.
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Publisher's Summary

No skill is more important in today's world than being able to think about, understand, and act on information in an effective and responsible way. What's more, at no point in human history have we had access to so much information, with such relative ease, as we do in the 21st century. But because misinformation out there has increased as well, critical thinking is more important than ever.

These 24 rewarding lectures equip you with the knowledge and techniques you need to become a savvier, sharper critical thinker in your professional and personal life. By immersing yourself in the science of cognitive biases and critical thinking, and by learning how to think about thinking (a practice known as metacognition), you'll gain concrete lessons for doing so more critically, more intelligently, and more successfully.

The key to successful critical thinking lies in understanding the neuroscience behind how our thinking works - and goes wrong; avoiding common pitfalls and errors in thinking, such as logical fallacies and biases; and knowing how to distinguish good science from pseudoscience. Professor Novella tackles these issues and more, exploring how the (often unfamiliar) ways in which our brains are hardwired can distract and prevent us from getting to the truth of a particular matter.

Along the way, he provides you with a critical toolbox that you can use to better assess the quality of information. Even though the world is becoming more and more saturated information, you can take the initiative and become better prepared to make sense of it all with this intriguing course.

Disclaimer: Please note that this recording may include references to supplemental texts or print references that are not essential to the program and not supplied with your purchase.

©2012 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2012 The Great Courses

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  •  
    K-Rock Perkiomenville, PA United States 10-02-13
    K-Rock Perkiomenville, PA United States 10-02-13 Member Since 2013
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    "Common sense guide to skepticism"
    What did you love best about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    The Professor did a very nice job of breaking down some modern-day myths and deconstructed them in such a way that there's little room for anyone to argue against it


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Marianne? No Ginger. Kidding...this is a series of lectures narrated by the professor who provided the lecture


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I don't know that there was any one scene (lecture) in particular that was more compelling than the next. I did enjoy the lectures that discussed scientific greats throughout history that alllowed their biases to derail or misguide further achievements.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    meh...this is more of an academic excercise than a suspenseful thrill read. The material was good, but nothing I couldn't put down


    Any additional comments?

    the key to the title of this book is A "SCIENTIFIC" guide to critical thinking. Shame on me for not figuring this out, out of the gate, but I originally downloaded this due to an interest in "strategic" thinking in the workplace. While there are undoubtedly parallels in terms of the process of thinking and good information with respect to recognizing biases and how the brain/memory work...this is very much a discussion on debunking or veryifing scientific evidence versus any non-scientific business process.
    It's a very good listen nontheless but not what I was expecting and not overly applicable to a corporate business setting (which again, is my own mistake). I only point this out in case anyone else struggles with reading comprehension like I did.

    51 of 53 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jason FPO, AP, United States 09-23-13
    Jason FPO, AP, United States 09-23-13 Member Since 2013
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    "Clear thinking is valuable beyond measure!"

    First off, let me preface this review by saying I was already familiar with Steven Novella through his podcast, The Skeptics Guide to the Universe.

    When I heard he had this series of lectures available on Audible, I was quite excited!

    I was hoping for a clear, detailed and thorough treatment of Critical Thinking - and Novella delivers in spades, covering topic after topic with a treatment that is brisk, peppered with examples, constructed in a logical and understandable manner and order, and delivered eloquently.

    The content is exactly what is says on the tin: if you are interested in Critical Thinking, in knowing how you think and how TO think -- there is no fat here. Logical fallacies and cognitive biases are examined, illustrated and explained.

    I would caution the potential listener that this is a series of lectures on a specific subject; I enjoyed it immensely because I happen to be interested in the topic. If I didn't have that interest or I was expecting more of a narrative-type production, I think I would be disappointed.

    A further caution: if you have a set of "alternative beliefs", prepare to be challenged! Examine the unfavorable reviews to see this side of things.

    However -- and in summary -- if you desire to develop your Critical Thinking skills, to build the sharpest reasoning possible for yourself, or just to explore a scientific approach to understanding how your brain plays tricks on itself, then I give this work the highest recommendation!

    51 of 53 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marc 03-27-14
    Marc 03-27-14
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    "well worth the time to listen to, good roundup"
    What did you love best about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    Most of the facts and ideas presented in this course are well known to everyone who has read a bit about or heard from modern "mind science" or "how our brain works" talks. Yet, Novella's roundup is great to listen to, well paced, always interesting and well worth both time and energy spent.
    I really enjoyed, for once, a scientist to remind the listener that he, the scientist, does not know it all and will probably not be right all the time. For one time a tutor explains, in detail, that using your own brain and mind means to check the facts and not just play along. A fair approach.


    What other book might you compare Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills to and why?

    M. Shermer's "The Believing Brain" is quite similar in general approach, but concentrates too much on personal vendetta of the author and/or believe system. There are more comparable titles, but most, in my eyes (ears), suffer from the same basic problem: Scientists that want to make you BELIEVE that they do not need to believe, because they know all the facts for fact, are ... wretched(?).
    Most comparable books start of with or repeat sentences like "well, we know for a fact that ..." - and that, exactly, is not scientific thinking. It's religion.
    Novella does not fall for this.


    What does Professor Steven Novella bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Most books that cover the same topic come up with the ever repeating "experiments" that "scientists" have done, some of which date back to the 1930s or whatever. These experiments as well as the conclusions drawn from them are not that convincing, in setup, target and evidence. Yet, "science" seems unable to come up with new studies, new experiments and new approaches, so most books chew through the same data over and over again, almost in religious circles.
    Novella gets around this quite well by just shortly pointing towards those experiments, but explaining thought processes and prejudices in more "today's" contexts, seemingly being still in contact with the real world and not lost in "scientist's drinking clubs". His narration, wit, pointyness (does that word exist?) and personal involvement make you believe he actually means what he says, yet has the distance to always remember you: He might be wrong.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    There are a few "funny" side notes that are funny enough to make you giggle or even laugh for a moment, but overall the pace (30 minute lectures) and dedication is just about right to not NEED jokes or horror stories.


    Any additional comments?

    Can you expect "new insights"? No, if you have ever read anything about modern brain science or mind theory. Are you looking for a sumup of the current "believe" in why we believe and how we err in making up our minds: This is a great approach that won't even harm a religious listener (and those are often the targets of pity for so many other authors/teachers).
    Not that I am of that kind anyway :-)

    12 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Patrick United States 01-21-14
    Patrick United States 01-21-14 Member Since 2011

    Greetings. My brother introduced me to Audible in 2011. Since, nothing but enjoyment. Hopefully my reviews are very useful to you. Enjoy!

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    "Educating your mind for our society."
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes I would. Very informative and exposes the listener to things going on that impact your life that you know nothing about and no way to offset it. It provides very useful info regarding nearly every aspect of your life. The narrator/professor speaks in layman term. Very pleasant to listen to.


    Have you listened to any of Professor Steven Novella’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No


    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cody PACIFIC, WA, United States 08-17-13
    Cody PACIFIC, WA, United States 08-17-13 Member Since 2013
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    "Blew. Me. Away."
    Any additional comments?

    As another listener stated, this should be required listening for everyone. I honestly feel like that the skills I learned as a result of these lectures have made me a more observant, overall better person. I have a better grasp on the reality of the world around me because I learned how to pierce through the crap, and really wonder why and how things happen. Thank you Professor Steven Novella for sharing your wisdom.

    33 of 37 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Magnus Hägersten, Sweden 07-29-13
    Magnus Hägersten, Sweden 07-29-13
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    "Should be required reading for everyone."

    With bogus information bombarding us every day, many people would benefit from a skeptical guide to the universe such as this.

    23 of 26 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John Skaneateles, NY, United States 02-10-14
    John Skaneateles, NY, United States 02-10-14 Member Since 2012
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    "Outstanding!"

    As never before , we have easy access to massive amounts of information from a myriad of sources.

    How can we determine fact from fiction, science from pseudo science, the effect of biases, and the relative validity of the information we are exposed to? How do we avoid scams, charlatans, con artists, spin meisters, , bad science, and deception? How do we keep from fooling ourselves by our own faulty senses, biases, and flaws in our cognition?

    Critical thinking. These skills are vital to most accurately understand and interact with the world around us. Bad information abounds and this course will give you the tools to avoid the pitfalls so many fall into.

    This course is excellent. The material is presented in a very clear and enjoyable way with many examples we are all familiar with. I can't say enough good things about this course.

    EVERYBODY should listen to this course!!!! The world would be a much better place.


    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Douglas Auburn, WA, United States 08-10-13
    Douglas Auburn, WA, United States 08-10-13 Member Since 2008

    College English professor who loves classic literature, psychology, neurology and hates pop trash like Twilight and Fifty Shades of Grey.

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    "The Great Courses Lectures..."

    are perhaps the best use of audible books ever. I have listened to countless courses in literature, philosophy, and medicine, and they NEVER disappoint. They are all given by a leading lecturer in any given field and are ALWAYS high level university material... This set of lectures by Steven Novallis should be heard by absolutely everyone. As a college instructor, I can unequivocally state that the thing most needed in our culture is clear, logical, critical thinking. This is why I am always saddened to see the paucity of reviews on audible books like this one (I think I am the third one here on Audible with ZERO on Amazon!) while readers line up for tripe, titillation and magical beliefs in "books" about little boys who supposedly go to heaven, satanic ritual hoaxes, the Twilight series and, of course, the poorly conceived and even more poorly rendered pornography of James, Day, and a growing list of other female writers striving for their place in the smut trade. It is no wonder so few of us can think clearly and why human evolution remains such a slow and unsteady process...

    63 of 75 people found this review helpful
  •  
    R. Anthony 08-26-13
    R. Anthony 08-26-13
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    "Fantastic learning experience."

    This series of lectures was both entertaining and very enlightening. I found myself every bit as engaged with this as with most of the fiction titles I've listened to and not the slightest bit dry.

    The info itself translates well for non-scientists. IMHO it gives the average person different ways of approaching questions and claims made by others - be it medical professionals, sales people or other individuals.

    Well worth listening to.

    17 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lloyd SOUTHLAKE, TX, United States 09-06-13
    Lloyd SOUTHLAKE, TX, United States 09-06-13
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    "A great guide"
    What did you love best about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    IT covered a lot of ground and did so well.


    What does Professor Steven Novella bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    I do a lot of driving and it covered the topic without the need for visuals.


    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 65 results PREVIOUS127NEXT
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  • Stan
    Auckland, New Zealand
    9/29/13
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    "Excellent listen"

    Dr Steven Novella has written an excellent series of lessons that really helps one understand why people believe strange things. More importantly though, he explains how our own brains can deceive us. Ever wondered how everyone else around you remembers something completely different to how you remember it? Or how someone can come to a completely different conclusion to something than you did, even though you both had the exact same data? This book is fascinating and helps one realise, just because you saw it/ heard it/ analysed it (etc.) doesn't mean you'll come to the correct conclusion unless you take steps to ensure you don't let personal bias get in the way.

    His many years as a teacher at Yale and podcasting ensure it is very easy to listen to this series of lectures. Broken down into half hour sessions, you can go through it is small chunks (I listened to it in three large chunks though, I was enjoying it so much). The one criticism I would have, being an audiobook, the times Dr Novella mentions different visual phenomena that fool us becomes a little difficult, not having the picture in front of you (some are famous and probably don't need an accompanying picture, but some aren't). The same with the audio phenomena. It would have been easy to include them in the audiobook. There also appeared to be mention of a workbook, which I could not find out anything about.

    Having said that, those few issues were not serious enough for me to take any marks off. This is a great book with some truly fascinating things to learn, read in a way that made the time pass by so quickly.

    Thoroughly recommend it.

    10 of 11 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    York
    7/7/14
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    "This covers it all"

    So as a scientist, this is an area of great personal interest and I've done a huge amount of background reading in this subject. This one book covers all aspects of critical thinking. If you are familiar with this area, then be prepared to hear some of the same examples you will have come across elsewhere, but don't let that put you off. This is clear and well laid out and I wish everyone could listen to it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Ben
    LONDON, United Kingdom
    8/31/14
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    "A toolkit for life"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    This is quite the most useful course I have bought, I have so many bookmarks and notes in this. I felt the need to have the content: including heuristics and logical fallacies memorised so that I can steer a safe course around the hucksters of modern advertising and over the pitfall of modern life.


    What other book might you compare Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills to, and why?

    It's pretty unique, but if I had to I'd say it reads like a survival guide (or a handbook to common problems you might be having with your wetware). The problem/issue is stated clearly (usually some kind of problem with perception or the brain's habit of creating useful but problematic short cuts to methodical truth evaluation) then a useful label then the remedy to ameliorate the problem, cool I promise.


    What about Professor Steven Novella’s performance did you like?

    Engaging, I love the supporting evidence the set up so to speak for the course, fascinating!


    If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    Lol, it would be a documentary and it might be:The brain a users guide, or Under the hood


    Any additional comments?

    Thanks great courses

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    London
    12/26/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "very strong start but undermined in by bias"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    Perhaps it cant be. How many of us can be truly objective?

    I didnt expect anything different on brain structure and chemistry, so was expecting the a priori conclusion that there is no 'self', even though the explanations given need not be the final word in themselves. Is the cause of a light switching on, the switch itself ?

    However for a course that billed itself as critical thinking I expected better when it came to genuine reservations regarding Darwinian Evolution. Why? Because there is no other subject in Science that seems to raise emotions as much as this. Objections are often dismissed simply because of who presents them and invariably assumes that each protestor must necessarily be a Creationist which is not necessarily true (Richard Milton for example described himself as an agnostic). So in such a course this was inevitably going to be a pivotal revealing topic. Yes, the context in which this was discussed was vis-a-vis Creationism, and from this the impression given was simply that there were some gaps that might be explained in the future. Is this not however a case of the very wishful thinking that is criticised earlier on in the course? Also the complaint that the alternative explanation was not scientific compelling is not for me the primary issue but rather the doubts of flaws of Darwinian Evolution expressed in the first place.

    I think that the other issue was this course was really heavily centred around the scientific method with a logic overlay, which granted was pointed out at the start. However this precludes approaches such as metaphysics, that does not lend itself to the scientific method but is consistent and no less critical in the application of logic.


    Has Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills put you off other books in this genre?

    No because it will be very dependent on the individual course tutor.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    The narration itself was well done.


    You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    yes the first section of the book was very good, particularly some of the examples of conspiracy theory. Unfortunately once you see a bias, particularly in this type of course, it then undermines the delivery.


    Any additional comments?

    For logic and critical thinking I found D Q McInerney's 'Being Logical : A Guide to Good Thinking, a much smaller but good concise guide.
    Importantly for the scientific paradigm Thomas Kuhn's 'The Structure of Scientific Revolutions' , Karl Popper's 'The Logic of Scientific Discovery' and yes even Paul Feyerabend's 'Against Method'

    6 of 19 people found this review helpful
  • Ned
    7/7/14
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    "thank you made my life look so boring now"
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    some what.


    What other book might you compare Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills to, and why?

    "secret history o f the world" :-)


    Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Professor Steven Novella?

    enyone else will do


    Do you think Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    no


    Any additional comments?

    the professor was trying to denounce some myths with not so easy to proof theorys of his, leaving everyting in hands of coincidence.

    0 of 3 people found this review helpful
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