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The Invisible Gorilla: And Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us | [Christopher Chabris, Daniel Simons]

The Invisible Gorilla: And Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us

Reading this book will make you less sure of yourself - and thats a good thing. In The Invisible Gorilla, Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons, creators of one of psychology's most famous experiments, use remarkable stories and counterintuitive scientific findings to demonstrate an important truth: Our minds dont work the way we think they do. We think we see ourselves and the world as they really are, but were actually missing a whole lot.
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Publisher's Summary

Reading this book will make you less sure of yourself - and that's a good thing. In The Invisible Gorilla, Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons, creators of one of psychology's most famous experiments, use remarkable stories and counterintuitive scientific findings to demonstrate an important truth: Our minds don't work the way we think they do. We think we see ourselves and the world as they really are, but we're actually missing a whole lot.

Chabris and Simons combine the work of other researchers with their own findings on attention, perception, memory, and reasoning to reveal how faulty intuitions often get us into trouble. In the process, they explain:

  • Why a company would spend billions to launch a product that its own analysts know will fail
  • How a police officer could run right past a brutal assault without seeing it
  • Why award-winning movies are full of editing mistakes
  • What criminals have in common with chess masters
  • Why measles and other childhood diseases are making a comeback
  • Why money managers could learn a lot from weather forecasters

The Invisible Gorilla reveals the myriad ways that our intuitions can deceive us, but its much more than a catalog of human failings. Chabris and Simons explain why we succumb to these everyday illusions and what we can do to inoculate ourselves against their effects. Ultimately, the book provides a kind of x-ray vision into our own minds, making it possible to pierce the veil of illusions that clouds our thoughts and to think clearly for perhaps the first time.

©2010 Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons (P)2010 Random House

What the Critics Say

"From courtrooms to bedrooms to boardrooms, this fascinating book shows how psychological illusions bedevil every aspect of our public and private lives. An owner's manual for the human mind!" (Daniel Gilbert, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and New York Times best-selling author of Stumbling Upon Happiness)

What Members Say

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    Michael Reno, NV, United States 01-22-11
    Michael Reno, NV, United States 01-22-11 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    11
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    "Nothing new, has a few interesting acecdotes"

    I was expecting something far more "usuable" as a tool of instruction. Instead it simply speaks and excessive lenght about a few interesting academic ideas. I think the goal was to make some money for the author's and the publisher, but taking a 45 minute academic lecture and expand it to something more marketable.

    There are a few interesting discussions, but about 60% is pure repetition and pointless commentary.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dianne O Canada 01-10-11
    Dianne O Canada 01-10-11 Listener Since 2009

    Dianne in Canada

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Interesting Info but..."

    The first have of this book was pretty interesteding but the second half became pretty boring. The author seemed to be fixated on certain ideas which was strange because it was like he was critizing others for doing the same thing he was doing....he thinks his info is all fact. This book was well narrated but was somewhat of a dissapointment. Some of it was helpful as well. If it didnt' become so boring I would have rated it higher.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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