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Let There Be Light Audiobook

Let There Be Light: Physics, Philosophy & the Dimensional Structure of Consciousness

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Publisher's Summary

Let There Be Light presents a simple, beautiful, and elegant view of the oneness of all life, subjective and objective. It demonstrates the unity of the physical world with conscious experience of the physical world. Consciousness is not inside space and time, space and time are within consciousness; they are a special structure of the perceptual portion of consciousness.

Author Stephen Hage explores enigmas in physics which still exist and cannot be satisfactorily explained. He explains why the "Dimensional Structure" of consciousness is a new paradigm that can help us to better understand how the universe works - as Copernicus did when he shattered the myth that the sun orbits the earth, rather than the other way around.

Conversational and friendly, this audiobook presents a new myth and paradigm for understanding consciousness. It is intended to be a valuable resource for the intelligent lay person interested in the deep and meaningful connections between consciousness, physics, quantum mechanics, myth, and meditation.

©2013 Algora Press (P)2015 Wetware Media

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (59 )
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4.2 (55 )
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4.4 (57 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Margaret Fox santa barbara, ca 05-30-15
    Margaret Fox santa barbara, ca 05-30-15

    zorrozona

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Wonderful exciting ideas"

    I have finally found an author who disassembles the complex ideas and facts that is modern physics. He then reassembles the components one upon another building our understanding to a new level.
    This is for anyone with a desire to comprehend our existence and how we relate to the universe.
    Narration is perfect in tone, pace and emotion.

    10 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Diana 09-30-15
    Diana 09-30-15 Member Since 2013

    Practicing Idealist, Dabbling Realist ;)

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "YES!!! Interesting, understandable, best one yet"

    After struggling through a few Consciousness books where physics and philosophy were the main focus, at last a book with more "aha!" moments than "banging-head-on-a-brick-wall" moments has been found.

    Thank goodness!

    These ideas are written by an author who has the ability to teach (make complex information understandable and even fun) and is narrated in a way that makes listening enjoyable.

    The rapid evolution of humanity's consciousness is discussed with interesting points about radio, tv, computers, the internet, even Facebook. AI and nanotech . . . this author has fascinating observations about where humanity is now, how we got to this point, and probable future developments.

    This book is going to be listened to again, then the "banging-head-on-a-brick-wall" books will be listened to again. Maybe next time the better foundation provided by this book will make the other books easier to understand . . . .

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Elan Sun Star Hawaii 06-08-15
    Elan Sun Star Hawaii 06-08-15 Member Since 2015

    sun

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    "brilliant Research / Revolutionary"
    What made the experience of listening to Let There Be Light the most enjoyable?

    Lucid insights into a complex subject... a lively discussion of the multidimensional reality we live in.

    Stephen j. Hage has crafted a brilliant explanation of and insight into the multiplicity of dimensional experience and multiple dimensional realities. His clear definitions of realities and personal experience of the "observer" and the quantum world and the social and shared reality worlds as well as the subjective world all bring into perspective what I consider the best book ever written on this subject.

    Defining quantum reality and still allowing the lay person to relate to personal experience while keeping a broad perspective on multiple realities and dimensions is an extremely complex challenge.

    Hage has laid out in quite simple language the many worlds insights as well as the relative subjective observer paradox in a manner that deserve wide attention and applause literally.

    Read this book.


    What did you like best about this story?

    all of it


    Which character – as performed by Andrew Mulcare – was your favorite?

    insights of author.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    The Evolving Realities.


    Any additional comments?

    Lucid insights into a complex subject... a lively discussion of the multidimensional reality we live in.

    Stephen j. Hage has crafted a brilliant explanation of and insight into the multiplicity of dimensional experience and multiple dimensional realities. His clear definitions of realities and personal experience of the "observer" and the quantum world and the social and shared reality worlds as well as the subjective world all bring into perspective what I consider the best book ever written on this subject.

    Defining quantum reality and still allowing the lay person to relate to personal experience while keeping a broad perspective on multiple realities and dimensions is an extremely complex challenge.

    Hage has laid out in quite simple language the many worlds insights as well as the relative subjective observer paradox in a manner that deserve wide attention and applause literally.

    Read this book.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bailey 06-05-15
    Bailey 06-05-15
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    "Better than I expected."

    Bridges physics and philosophy nicely and Andrew Mulcare's performance is very good. If you're interested in either topic I would recommend giving this book a chance could be a rewarding experience.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    wbiro 07-14-16
    wbiro 07-14-16 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Good Science, Weak California Philosophizing"

    I enjoyed the science segments - it is good to re-hear histories, backdrops, anecdotes, and difficult concepts in new words and from a fresh perspective (which can shed new light on a difficult topic), and the author was original enough to offer them.

    But on the philosophical side, which was a continuation of Samuel Avery's Consciousness book, what you have here is a good scientist impaired by California pop culture and trendy Yuppie mystical vogues (transcendental meditation, Zen, Eastern mysticism), which he became lost in for large segments of the book (and where he loses the reader's confidence by lingering long on such archaic nonsense, to the point of disparaging the 'Western Caucasian mindset' (if there ever was a Yuppie bandwagon to jump on), and by making statements like 'matter does not exist', 'you do not 'have' a consciousness' (you are in' it), 'consciousness does not need the body nor can it be found in the brain' (indicating his weakness in other sciences, particularly biology, and, just to note, of computers, where he says they 'work on symbols' - which they do not - that is merely what users like him sees - they work on routines in an IF-THEN environment); he takes the side of the falling tree making no sound if there is no one to hear it, that inanimate objects are imbued with 'spirit and metaphysics' (again abandoning physics for fashionable mysticism); that 'space only exists when our eyes receive photons' (don't laugh!) (and don't ever, EVER close your eyes), there is no 'space and time' - only photons that are 'being' (a West-Coast 'be-in', I suppose), and claiming (from a lack of extended thinking) that concepts like 'love' are dimensionless (not taking into account the required physical foundations - an illustration of the author's playing mere semantic parlor games with word meanings - a fatal sinkhole for even academic philosophers); that linguistic 'labels' obscure our 'seeing' reality (when, in reality, 'seeing without labels' reduces the human mind to that of a bug - and this is a Zen thing, the 'bug state of mind' being that which Zen makes a lifetime pursuit - which even a bug would laugh at); and at one point hastily jumping to the conclusion that such preposterous claims 'codify religion'. He said 'myths die hard', and this book is a good illustration of that.

    All of the above claims indicate one thing - a lack of extended thinking on the philosophical front, and falling prey to the trendy mental baggage of a clueless, yet still-fashionable, past.

    The author gives far too much credence to the value of myth and metaphysics (other than the make-believe curiosities of the uninformed which they are), and he repeats the words 'belief' and 'believe' a inordinate number of times for a book with 'physics' in the title - this is science, you do not 'believe' - you 'acknowledge probabilities'. Better if he said he was offering new, potentially useful perspectives with which to peer into the unknown with (what I would have said). So sure, you may pull, out of your "Perspective Toolbag" the perspective that matter does not exist (for example) when peering into the unknown - it is of value only in that the more tools there are in our Perspective Toolbag, the better the odds are that we will actually 'see' what is out there (sometimes right before us) in the still-unknown.

    At one point I thought that the book was written strictly for other flaky Californians. Beyond this, you will remain in the dark as to where the author is coming from (other than pushing flaky trendy mindsets) and where he is going with 'matter is a myth' - right up until the very end of the book when he finally gets around to touching on it - the premise that space and time are secondary to quantum entanglement and where both (space and time) come from quantum decoherence (hence his 'space and time do not pre-exist but emerge from spaceless and timeless physics' - and you can go where you want with that) -

    Which brings us to the good side (on the philosophical front) - the author basically forwards what Samuel Avery forwarded, that physicists may need a new paradigm to make the next leap in our understanding of the universe, which is at best a sentimental and fuzzy notion, much like the author's statement near the very end, where "gravity is the result of noise from quantum fuzziness". So the book leaves us within (the still-fuzzy state of) quantum mechanics, which is not a bad place to leave an inquiring (or even creative) mind.

    So go ahead, suffer through the trendy, West Coast, anti-Western, anti-Caucasian, pro-Eastern mysticism, and stay for the occasional fresh takes on science (mainly physics) (the book is about half science and half California pop culture). Prepare for references to the New Republic (comrade) and Pink Floyd (toke toke). One of my pet peeves - he also makes the common mistake of calling the results of applied engineering 'science', such as 'science created the atom bomb' - no, applied engineering created the atom bomb, science discovered the principles. This common error has given science an unfair bad name (while engineering has escaped the slings and arrows!).

    So the book is a good illustration of how a 'thinker' can become detached from reality (and I define 'reality' as "that which will annihilate you whether you acknowledge it or not"). The most curious (laughable?) statement (if it can top any of those above): "Consciousness is not a scientific theory, its scope is enormously larger than science, making it impossible to test within the normal bounds of science". This is not the only claim based on ignorance - here it is an ignorance of existing knowledge already verified (and even applied) in other branches of science and engineering, especially in the biological (and biotech) fields where physically accessing the brain is involved (read 'consciousness'), such as existing brainwave technology.

    So the book presents pieces of good science (some experiments I hadn't come across before - a good thing), a good paradigm-shift postulate, but a lot of bad philosophizing - and a final important note here - he still thinks (as many do) that philosophers (at least relevant ones) still try to divine reality through philosophizing (such as how the brain works) - when the investigation of physical reality has long been passed on to the scientific method (for around several hundred years now). This is not the author's fault, for philosophy is currently lost after all (though I found it - in the toilet), and offers no overall guidance for life (other than what I've developed, having had to completely restructure philosophy in the process) (search for "The Philosophical Totem - Numi Who").





    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Scaht 11-30-15
    Scaht 11-30-15 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Synonyms are only good to a point"
    If you could sum up Let There Be Light in three words, what would they be?

    Great book!


    What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

    Provides ample opportunity for extrapolation of popular thoughts and ideas.


    What about Andrew Mulcare’s performance did you like?

    Can also be used, in part, for basic contemplative meditations if you can tolerate the "lists" of examples that were often tediously long.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Nebiyu 07-04-16
    Nebiyu 07-04-16 Member Since 2015
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    "Eye opening"

    If you want to challenge your current reality and find a new comprehensive perspective for life and conciseness; read this book!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Keane 05-28-16
    Keane 05-28-16 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Easy to understand"

    Very comprehensive narration of complicated concepts. Making good sense and logically sound. Like the book a lot.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alejandro 06-20-15
    Alejandro 06-20-15 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Pastiche"

    Going round and round to say sth that could have been said in a pop magazine article...

    5 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ndg 10-13-15
    ndg 10-13-15 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "arrogant and wanky"

    tedious and boring. he self-importantly creates his own lingo, then expects everyine else to see the world through his own intellectual superiority. Almost no discussion of real science.

    2 of 7 people found this review helpful
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  • Francis
    4/18/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Fantasy Physics"
    What did you like best about Let There Be Light? What did you like least?

    Starts off strongly, introduces well the mind-boggling perplexity of Quantum Physics.


    What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

    After a strong start, author throws in a chapter about meditation. Alarm bells. Later chapters are more of a rambling sermon than proper exposition of the author's proposed 'myth'.to replace the Cartesian model of the universe. I got well lost. I've nothing against the author trying to come up with a theory to explain the universe, but if it can't be expressed in easier language than this - at times it is almost wilfully obscure - then I'm afraid it has very little chance of success. If you are the author and you see this - may I suggest - ditch the meditation chapter and instead take the time to explain your screens more coherently and in shorter sentences (it's hard to listen to long sentences that go in and of and around the thing that was once referred to having past it on and in and of the earlier part of this sentence, for example).


    What didn’t you like about Andrew Mulcare’s performance?

    Often sounded bored. Intonation completely wrong at times (e.g. under-pinings instead of underpinnings).made clumsy sentence structure even harder to grasp.Partly I think reader not to blame because you need to understand the material to know where best to pause and take a breath, and not many will have the time to understand the material. Probably better to get the author himself to perform it, Once he's re-written it.


    If this book were a film would you go see it?

    Absolutely not. Silly question for this kind of book.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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