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13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time | [Michael Brooks]

13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time

Science starts to get interesting when things don't make sense. Science's best-kept secret is that there are experimental results and reliable data that the most brilliant scientists can neither explain nor dismiss. If history is any precedent, we should look to today's inexplicable results to forecast the future of science. Michael Brooks heads to the scientific frontier to meet 13 modern-day anomalies and discover tomorrow's breakthroughs.
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Publisher's Summary

Science starts to get interesting when things don't make sense.

Science's best-kept secret is that there are experimental results and reliable data that the most brilliant scientists can neither explain nor dismiss. In the past, similar "anomalies" have revolutionized our world, as in the 16th century, when a set of celestial anomalies led Copernicus to realize that the Earth revolves around the Sun and not the reverse, and in the 1770s, when two chemists discovered oxygen because of experimental results that defied the theories of the day. If history is any precedent, we should look to today's inexplicable results to forecast the future of science.

In 13 Things That Don't Make Sense, Michael Brooks heads to the scientific frontier to meet 13 modern-day anomalies and discover tomorrow's breakthroughs.

©2008 Michael Brooks; (P)2008 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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Performance
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  •  
    Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 09-04-12
    Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 09-04-12 Member Since 2014

    Letting the rest of the world go by

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "You will learn things you didn't already know"

    For each chapter the author tells you what he's going to tell you about an anomaly, then tells you about it, and then explains to you what he just told you, and all the while explaining to you the science that surrounds it.

    The book is so good at putting the context around the mystery that after listening to the book, I was able to explain each of the 13 mysterious from memory while discussing the book with my spouse and she even acted like she was interested with what I had to say.

    I was reluctant to purchase this book because I thought it was going to be 13 different essays. I was wrong. It really is not. I don't like listening to essays because it takes me an hour to get into a topic while listening, but for this book each chapter flowed into the next chapter and seemed related to the preceding chapter.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Margaret San Francisco, CA USA 06-04-12
    Margaret San Francisco, CA USA 06-04-12 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A Go-To book on my playlist"
    Would you listen to 13 Things That Don't Make Sense again? Why?

    I have listened to it multiple times. This is one of those books that I listen to time and again and learn something new, or have something new to think about each time.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The giant virus... sorry, just kidding. It's a book about gaps in science - not exactly a character based drama.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    They're all interesting: this book reminds me that science is still far from having explained... well much at all, really. It's just beginning.


    What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

    The more we know, the more we know we don't know.


    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eileen Pomona, CA, USA 09-12-08
    Eileen Pomona, CA, USA 09-12-08
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The best audio book I have!!!"

    Wow!!! If you liked The Universe in a Nutshell, Stephen Hawking's New Book you filp on this one. Not a dull moment from page one to the end. LOVED IT ALL.

    19 of 24 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Diane Louisville, KY, United States 03-31-13
    Diane Louisville, KY, United States 03-31-13 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    107
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    "Confused yet?"

    Don't get me wrong--as Brooks goes to some trouble to illustrate, it's when we think we have final and definitive answers to the mysteries of our universe that we get into trouble. Brooks tackles subjects ranging from dark matter to homeopathy (this last one particularly surprised me). His explanation of the current state of knowledge on such topics is generously interspersed with tales of the foibles of the scientific method in the hands of all too human scientists. What comes across clearly is the risk of any unquestioned orthodox belief or assumption--yet how are we to gain new insights unless we are to build on the knowledge and discoveries of preceding generations? It is a conundrum that will inevitably haunt any scientist who also happens to be a human being.

    It can be the curse of such books that the "cutting edge" of science very quickly becomes a dull blade, indeed. This book is over 4 years old and I suspect that there have been numerous developments in the fields Brooks covers since the book's publication. Since I'm not exactly on the cutting edge myself, I found the material to be enlightening and often amazing, although the discussion did get pretty technical at times. It is the study of the human aspect of scientific discovery that will continue to be relevant long after the science has been outdated.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robert Adams Armada, MI 12-12-11
    Robert Adams Armada, MI 12-12-11 Member Since 2011

    RantEng

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Not a book for your typical liberal arts major."

    I loved this book. But then, I'm a scientist, engineer,and geek. If you are thrilled by all things science, then this is a great book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Addison Herminie, PA, United States 08-10-11
    Addison Herminie, PA, United States 08-10-11
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    "Very informative."

    This wasn't exactly what I was expecting in all honesty. There was alot of history mixed in with unexplained science. Normally I wouldn't have liked that very much, but it was done exceptionally well. The topics also were not exactly what I was expecting, but I think that was for the best. I was very impressed with the topics, and the discussions themselves. The topics included why we produce sexually as opposed to asexually, why we die, the placebo effect, there were a few quantum physics issues, etc. A very good read, if not a bit deep. I recommend being able to devote a bit more attention than usual to this book when you listen. It can get a bit complex at times.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael Janosky LYNDORA, PA, US 06-28-13
    Michael Janosky LYNDORA, PA, US 06-28-13 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Mind blowing as to how simple these problems are"

    Anyone who is interested in science and the world around them should read this book. All 13 things are almost completely taken for granted by us. Anywhere from the definition of death or dark matter and what keeps the stars in place are discussed. Michael Brooks arranges each point in a great way. There is a building feeling while reading. It's sounds odd to say that dark matter is the smallest topic in the scheme of things. That's until you realize that viruses and free will are much deeper topics that require understanding.

    Michael Brooks also explains each topic is such a way to give you scope without asking the reader to research for each subject matter. An amazing book....

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Patricia 01-02-13
    Patricia 01-02-13
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Incredible!"
    What did you love best about 13 Things That Don't Make Sense?

    This book really jazzed me! I've listened to it twice so far and also brought the book in print. It has inspired me to look deeper into all the subjects covered in the book and branch out. Even a year later I am still raving about this book. It's a real poser and if it doesn't make you think about and question life and all it's aspects then you are brain dead.


    What other book might you compare 13 Things That Don't Make Sense to and why?

    I'm looking forward to more form this author as well as Brian Greene, Stephen Hawking and all the people mentioned in the book.


    What about James Adams’s performance did you like?

    Well read, proper pronunciation, no exazzerations, can't hear breathing or other background noises.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    Brain food


    Any additional comments?

    Please, I want to see more books like this.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steve Issaquah, WA, United States 04-02-12
    Steve Issaquah, WA, United States 04-02-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Engaging and balanced, not overwhelming."

    The author does an excellent job of making extremely esoteric/complicated scientific theories accessible to the average reader/listener. I finally have a grasp on what dark energy/matter is believed to be (no small feat). And he provides a good balance between stating the cases both for and against for many of the unknowns.

    Don't be afraid to hit the "go back and listen to that bit again" button if something slips by you. I had to do that a few times to sort things out.

    The narrator sometimes sounds a bit pedantic/pretentious, but that could also be the subject matter. The technobabble glides off of his tongue smoothly (no small feat!) and he also projects an earnestness.

    Definitely a good listen.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cherie Cincinnati, OH, United States 12-02-11
    Cherie Cincinnati, OH, United States 12-02-11 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "I likes this book"
    Would you listen to 13 Things That Don't Make Sense again? Why?

    The author reviews several anomalous scientific theories. His review is for the most part unbiased and thorough.


    What did you like best about this story?

    It was unpretentious and interesting.


    Have you listened to any of James Adams’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    This is the first time I have listed to James Adam's performance. I will listen to more of his performances.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I found the contention between Newtonian physics and Quantum physics interesting.


    Any additional comments?

    none

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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