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The Shadow of the Torturer: The Book of the New Sun, Book 1 | [Gene Wolfe]

The Shadow of the Torturer: The Book of the New Sun, Book 1

The Shadow of the Torturer is the first volume in the four-volume epic, the tale of a young Severian, an apprentice to the Guild of Torturers on the world called Urth, exiled for committing the ultimate sin of his profession - showing mercy towards his victim.

Gene Wolfe's "The Book of the New Sun" is one of speculative fiction's most-honored series. In a 1998 poll, Locus Magazine rated the series behind only "The Lord of the Rings" and The Hobbit as the greatest fantasy work of all time.

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Publisher's Summary

The Shadow of the Torturer is the first volume in the four-volume epic, the tale of a young Severian, an apprentice to the Guild of Torturers on the world called Urth, exiled for committing the ultimate sin of his profession - showing mercy towards his victim.

Listen to more in the Book of the New Sun series.

©1980 Gene Wolfe; (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"The best science fiction novel of the last century." (Neil Gaiman)

  • World Fantasy Award, Best Novel, 1981
    • Favorite Audiobooks of 2010 (Fantasy Literature)

What Members Say

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  •  
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 03-20-10
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 03-20-10 Member Since 2005

    Gen-Xer, software engineer, and lifelong avid reader. Soft spots for sci-fi, fantasy, and history, but I'll read anything good.

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    "great writing, won't appeal to everyone"

    There was a time when the fantasy genre didn't just exist to entertain, but sometimes aspired to a higher level of artfulness. The Shadow of the Torturer is such a book. Set in a far distant future, when Earth's sun is fading and human society has lost much of its technological aptitude, Wolfe's novel has a haunting, elegiac quality. It's written in a voice reminiscent of 19th century writers like Poe or Dickens, which adds to the melancholy beauty. Fortunately for the squeamish, though torture is part of the story, it's not described in much detail.

    In terms of plot, The Shadow of the Torturer isn't a complex novel. The protagonist grows up under the protection of a strange, cloistered society, learns a few things about the outside world, betrays his guardians, and is thrown out to seek his own fortune -- familiar fantasy stuff. But what sets the book apart from standard swords-and-sorcery fare is the richness of its language and the great imagination in its details; the difference is like comparing a fine oil painting to a crude computer graphic rendering. It has subtlety that forces the reader to pay attention. Wolfe messes with time and space, contemplates philosophical ideas, writes long exchanges whose import isn't immediately clear, and relies on the audience to make sense of the strange, slightly dreamlike events that unfold in the story, rather than spelling out how they're connected.

    Without a doubt, this is a book that will absorb some readers and alienate others. Wolfe's ornate, college-level English, though not difficult, is not for everyone. Nor will everyone relate to the protagonist's detached, clinical voice. Basically, if you're looking for a light, Harry Potter-style book with instantly charismatic characters, you're better off going elsewhere. But, for readers who appreciate sophisticated writing and atmospheric, textured imaginary worlds, this is a great read.

    61 of 66 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States 04-11-12
    Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States 04-11-12

    A part-time buffoon and ersatz scholar specializing in BS, pedantry, schmaltz and cultural coprophagia.

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    "Original, Difficult and Well-Crafted."

    I am almost anti-fantasy. I find most derivative at best and banal to the extreme. Wolfe's first book in his famous The Book of the New Sun tetralogy, however, is genre fiction at its finest. Original, difficult and well-crafted, it is easy to see how Wolfe is regarded as a writer's writer.

    29 of 31 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Charlotte Pleasant Grove, UT, United States 10-24-10
    Charlotte Pleasant Grove, UT, United States 10-24-10 Member Since 2007
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    "Great reading of an intellectual masterpiece"

    Thought-provoking, image-rich and intricately plotted. This series has had a prized place on my bookshelf for years and I was thrilled to see it available as an audiobook. Even better, Jonathan Davis as narrator has a moderately slow (but not too slow) pace, great voice characterization, and handles the author's challenging and singular vocabular with ease.
    Wolfe is subtle, profound writer and demands close attention from his readers/ listeners; this is not a surf-along novel. If your attention is distracted for a minute, you could miss something vital, and need to rewind -- I sometimes have had to do that as I listen. But most of the time I am completely engrossed. This is one of the best finds I've made, ever.
    I hope to see more Wolfe audiobooks- beginning with this series' sequel/ continuance, "The Urth of the New Sun".

    18 of 19 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jefferson 10-21-12
    Jefferson 10-21-12 Member Since 2010

    I love reading and listening to books, especially fantasy, science fiction, children's, historical, and classics.

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    ""All of you are torturers, one way or another""

    The Shadow of the Torturer (1980), the first of the four books that comprise Gene Wolfe's science fiction masterpiece The Book of the New Sun, is a rich, moving, and challenging novel. Just in the first few chapters we learn that narrator Severian (who is writing his life story) was an orphan apprentice of the guild of torturers (the Seekers for Truth and Penitence) in the Citadel of sprawling Nessus (the City Imperishable) in the far future of Urth (earth?), under a dying sun; that the towers of the Citadel are long-derelict spaceships; that Severian has an eidetic memory; and that his youthful encounter with the rebel leader Vodalus set in motion events that will lead him to betray his guild, become an exile, and sit on the throne.

    The novel is disturbing! There are glimpses of the appalling "excruciations" the guild performs upon its "clients," and many characters are afflicted with grief, including Severian, who is cursed to remember every detail of his sad experiences. But it is also funny, as in the eccentric and grotesque characters like Dr. Talos and Baldanders and the banter between Severian and Agia.

    Severian's history is a demanding read. As in novels like A Voyage to Arcturus, everything seems to bear symbolic as well as narrative meaning. And Severian is not a completely reliable narrator, for he often lies and may be insane, and although he remembers everything, he selectively tells his story, at times eliding painful things and alluding to them later while narrating different events. And some things he recounts question the reality of his world (and ours).

    Severian has much to say about reality, memory, history, story, art, culture, justice, religion, meaning, and love. Provocative lines punctuate his text. Symbols "invent us, we are their creatures, shaped by their hard, defining edges." Or "time turns our lies to truths." Or "the charm of words … reduces to manageable entities all the passions that would otherwise madden and destroy us."

    Additionally, the richness of the novel's language, the elegance of its style, and the fertility of its imagination require slow savoring. In Severian's text common words rub shoulders with archaic or obscure ones, evoking the exotic texture of his world, as in names for officials (autarch, archon, castellan, chiliarch, lochage) and beasts of burden (dromedaries, oxen, metamynodons, onagers, hackneys).

    Numerous descriptions yield shivers of pleasure: "She sighed, and all the gladness went out of her face, as the sunlight leaves the stone where a beggar seeks to warm himself." Or "Behind the altar rose a wonderful mosaic of blue, but it was blank, as if a fragment of sky without cloud or star had been torn away and spread upon the curving wall." Or "(A spell there was, surely, in this garden. I could almost hear it humming over the water, voices chanting in a language I did not know but understood.)"

    Numerous scenes impress themselves on mind and heart, as when Severian visits the blind caretaker of the Borgesian library, finds a horribly wounded fighting dog, connects Thecla to the revolutionary, receives the black sword Terminus Est, falls into the Lake of Birds in the Garden of Everlasting Sleep, performs for the first time the mysteries of his guild's art, or witnesses a miracle with Dorcas.

    Jonathan Davis adds so much to the novel with his witty and compassionate reading, modifying his voice to enhance each character without drawing attention to himself. And it's a pleasure to hear him relish Wolfe's beautiful prose or say words like anacreontic, carnifex, epopt, fuligin, fulgurator, hipparch, paracoita, and psychopomp. (Though it does help to have the text handy!)

    At the end of The Shadow of the Torturer, Severian says he cannot blame his reader for refusing to follow him any more through his life, for "It is no easy road." Nevertheless, the next three novels reward the effort to read them manifold.

    16 of 17 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John 02-23-10
    John 02-23-10
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    "Not for everyone, but I enjoyed it."

    This is maybe one of the saddest books I've read. An overwhelming sense of isolation and loneliness pours out of each line. It is deeply emotional book, and I don't think such a book is for everyone.

    If you need constant action, hope, a quest, a hero with a purpose, and so on, this is not the book for you. There isn't even the hope of redemption for the protagonist and he really could use it. The story really is something quite dark and often times aimless.

    Now, I completely enjoyed the book and found myself easily lost in the story. I don't doubt it is due a good deal to the excellent narration. The random wandering, discoveries, and encounters keep the story moving along and interesting. It is a very dream-like tale.

    The only issue I had was that the author does ramble more than once, even to the point of being annoying in a few instances. Once during the book, I did sigh and think, "Can we get on with it?" However, this did not spoil my overall enjoyment.

    In short, it's a great story if you can appreciate a great setting where hope isn't offered as the protagonist wanders aimlessly into exile.

    15 of 16 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Arthur Berrill Goodwood, Ontario Canada 10-15-12
    Arthur Berrill Goodwood, Ontario Canada 10-15-12 Member Since 2013

    An avid, omnivorous but critical reader.

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    "A masterpiece read brilliantly"
    If you could sum up The Shadow of the Torturer in three words, what would they be?

    Compelling, intriguing, beautiful


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Severian. His view of the world in which he lives is coloured and shaped in a manner that draws you deeply into the story.


    What about Jonathan Davis’s performance did you like?

    No bombast. And brilliant characterization. The speed is just right - sometimes the readers push too hard and you lose content or move too slowly and your concentration lapses.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I know the book. I've lost count of how many times I have read the whole series. But Jonathon Davis brought the book alive and I found more value in Gene Wolfe's remarkable masterpiece than I had known was there.


    Any additional comments?

    This is not a book to everyone's taste. But everyone should try reading it - or listening to it. Its one of the great science fiction masterpieces. One reviewer referred to Gene Wolfe's "achingly beautiful sentences" and Jonathon Davis savours them, holds them up to marvel at then moves to the next one.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Matthew Muncie, IN, United States 07-14-12
    Matthew Muncie, IN, United States 07-14-12
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    "Great Performance of a Great Book"
    Would you listen to The Shadow of the Torturer again? Why?

    I read the book years ago and was delighted to see an audiobook version, so I decided to revisit the series. Jonathan Davis is an excellent reader, striking just the right tone for the narrator Severian. I'll be listening to the entire series and would love to see more audiobooks from Gene Wolfe.


    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    PC IS BS 05-27-10
    PC IS BS 05-27-10
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    "An incredibly poetic writer."

    Having read the New Sun books 25 years ago, I have to say that listening to them narrated by a truly great narrator made them even more enjoyable the second time around. Wolfes' writing is beautiful and hearing it in a different voice other than your own inner reading voice makes you appreciate his amazing ability to string words together, many of which he created for there rhythmic sound, in a melodic way which most authors can only dream of.

    11 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Angela Knoxville, TN, USA 05-15-12
    Angela Knoxville, TN, USA 05-15-12 Member Since 2009
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    "The character Jonathan Davis was born to play!"

    This book is the first part in a five part series, and only the first four books are available on Audible. I would say that this series is the story of the torturer's apprentice Severian, and his journey from lowest and most despised member of society to the throne, set in a far future Earth in which civilization and society are on a slow decline. I would say that, except that this is less a story and more a multi-dimensional mental jigsaw puzzle. The series requires that you, the listener, pay a great deal of attention to the plot, characters and vocabulary, and then listen to the whole thing all over again, possibly a few times, to get the richness, complexity and beauty of Gene Wolfe's vision. If you are prepared to make that kind of commitment, this is a great bargain as it will repay you in many hours of listening pleasure, getting better each time you listen again.

    If you are not familiar with Gene Wolfe's work, you would probably be surprised to hear this series compared to Lord of the Rings. After all, how many stories can live up to that kind of comparison? Amazingly The Book of the New Sun series does, and in some ways exceeds it, as these are more adult stories with some added layers of complexity.

    Audible really outdid themselves with this production. I can't imagine a finer narrator for this series than Jonathon Davis. His pacing, emphasis, vocal expressions and various character renderings are flawless. The pacing is particularly important, as nearly every sentence contains some clue to solving the final puzzle.

    I hope the final book in the series, The Urth of the New Sun, will be available at some point. Although written a few years after the first four in the series, it fits in so well with the rest of the story and solves so many unanswered questions that it appears to have been planned all along.

    15 of 17 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Daniel 06-10-13
    Daniel 06-10-13
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Too abstract for an audiobook"

    The narrative style of this book is one that I don't really enjoy in the first place. There is no active voice to be found, and the plot advances by fairly insignificant and underwhelming things just happening rather than being effected by the protagonist. This makes the story hard enough to follow in print where you can flip back a few pages to remind yourself how things progressed from A to B, but I constantly lost the thread while listening and often found myself completely bewildered. The narrator does a great job, though, which is a big plus if this is your kind of book.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
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  • Stephen
    letchworth, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
    4/3/10
    Overall
    "Very, very good"

    I've been waiting and hoping that Wolfe's Book of the New Sun would get an audiobook version. In terms of the original text Wolfe's work stands alongside that of Tolkien and Herbert, among the greatest and most rewarding of authors, one whose profound work repays the reader in direct proportion to their own effort. Now we get to listen to this lengthy meditation on love, memory and identity...and what a listen it is!

    The narration is smooth and measured and fits very well the tone and tempo of the book in my opinion. The complexity of Severian's character and the original text are well-served by Jonathon Davis and I would heartily recommend this to any fan of Wolfe. And if you're not already a fan of Wolfe this just might change your mind.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Peter
    Lymm, Cheshire, United Kingdom
    8/9/10
    Overall
    "Gene Wolfe's classic masterwork"

    Gene Wolfe's 4-volume 'Book of the New Sun' (5 volumes, when you add 'The Urth of the New Sun') is arguably one of the finest works of 20th century fiction, not just SF/fantasy. Like Jack Vance's 'Dying Earth' series (to which it respectfully nods), Wolfe sets his story so far in the future that SF and fantasy meld. Our own and subsequent ages survive only in garbled myth and archaeology. The story is beautifully written, and brims with stunning ideas, literary influences and inventiveness. Once appreciated, it lingers forever in the memory. On one level it can be read simply as a superior SF/fantasy story. However, new readers should be aware that it's much more tricksy than it first seems. Every sentence is carefully and deliberately crafted, the narrator can not always be relied on for accuracy, characters are often much more than they seem, and what appear to be inconsequential details assume huge significance later in the work. It repays multiple re-readings in a way few works do. If you get to the end and have enjoyed it, track down 'Solar Labyrinth' by Robert Borski and 'Lexicon Urthus' by Michael Andre-Driussi, and prepare to be gob-smacked and delighted by what you've missed. Then re-read it from the beginning!

    The narration is high quality and admirably serves the series. Just the right amount of voice characterisation without 'over acting'. Bravo audible!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Anton
    BerlinGermany
    4/3/10
    Overall
    "Fantastic"

    This is the first volume of the "Book of the New Sun". Wherever I read about this book before, I read that it is SF. I am not sure how to call it myself. There are a lot of surprising turns in the story. After listening to a third of it, I was convinced it is an unusual piece of fantasy; but then the story developed into something completely fantastic, full of symbolism, almost bizarre. For me, this book has more in common with the novels of E.T.A Hoffmann and the German romanticists of the early 19th century than with either SF or modern fantasy. The narration is excellent. Among the best I have listened to in the last year. If you have read something about Gene Wolfe, then you know about his frequent use of obscure words. But this was not as big a problem as I feared. My dictionary was not much help, though, and I had some opportunity to use the OED (unabridged) at my office. But this is extra fun, and you don't need to do this for following the story. I just downloaded the second volume of the series: "The Claw of the Conciliator".

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Mark
    United Kingdom
    6/11/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Dark and dreamy"

    There are plenty of reviews to suggest the quality of this work but I would single out the narration as one of the best matched to the story I have come across in listening to 100+ Audiobooks.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A User
    5/25/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Highly Unusual and Gripping Speculative Fiction"

    It's a hard task to make a protagonist a torturer, and yet Gene Wolfe creates the perfectly memorable character of Severian. One of the most unique characters to have merged in fiction and a truly engaging storyline, that works on several levels. It certainly has an almost dreamlike quality to it and like reading a historical diary, you come away wondering if what was recounted was a description of the actual events of the story or a highly biased and conflicting version as Severian, is if nothing else, a highly unreliable narrator.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • daniel
    Guildford, United Kingdom
    4/7/13
    Overall
    "darkly beautiful"

    This series has always been one of my all time favourites....a beautifully written saga set a million years in the future when our sun is dying and the eons of history preceding this story have faded beyond myth.Wolfe crafts a tale that works on numerous levels,indeed this novel has been voted a SF masterwork and its obvious why.just buy it,you wont be disappointed I promise...a magical experience

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Mirenda Rosenberg
    Ireland
    1/20/12
    Overall
    "Captivating - took me a while to get into the book"

    It took me a while to get into this book. I listen to audio-books while driving/walking/cleaning etc, and I found my attention drifting during the first hour (or so) of this book. However, once got to know Severian - once I gained a strong impression of who he was and the complications of his life - I was hooked. Every character is interesting, even the smallest peripheral characters are well developed. I strongly recommend this book and the rest of the series.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • mark
    Bristol, United Kingdom
    7/28/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A long and winding tale"

    I had tried to read this story a long time ago and had found the language to difficult at that time. Listening now, I figured would be the way to 'read' this story and for the first part of the story I did enjoy it.
    The story is told the classic style of a gothic story, it's told first person in the past perspective as if the hero of the story is writing it down. The setting for the first part, a vast, ancient city, which is now starting to decay, is a very gothic setting and I have to say that this sort of setting, with long dark corridors and forgotten court yards, really appealed to me. I loved this setting and the weird characters that lived in it. It felt to me, very much like the Titus Grown stories.
    However the second part of the story, where our 'hero', if a torturer can been seen as a hero, is exiled from his order for helping a 'client' die prematurely, this style of side stories seemed to me to slow the plot down to almost a standstill.
    And clearly this epic 4 part story was written as a single story and has been divided by the publisher to make a more saleable length, which means the first book ends with no sort of resolution and in fact seems to end right in the middle of a scene, Very annoying.
    But I have to say the language throughout is used beautifully, but that towards the end I did start to find it, overly verbose.
    The performance is excellent and Jonthan Davis's voice of our hero has that cold, detached and maybe slightly insane voice that you might almost expect from a man who has been bought up to inflict just the right amount of pain on someone to get them to talk, but not so much as to kill them.
    Not really sure at this point, if I will give the next book in the series a go.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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