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The City of Towers: Eberron: Dreaming Dark, Book 1 | [Keith Baker]

The City of Towers: Eberron: Dreaming Dark, Book 1

The City of Towers launches a brand new novel line set in the world of Eberron, Wizards of the Coast’s newest D&D campaign setting. Author Keith Baker’s proposal for the exciting world of Eberron was chosen from 11,000 submissions, and he is the co-author of the Eberron Campaign Setting, the RPG product that launched the setting. The Eberron world will continue to grow through new roleplaying game products, novels, miniatures, and electronic games.
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Publisher's Summary

The City of Towers launches a brand new novel line set in the world of Eberron, Wizards of the Coast’s newest D&D campaign setting.

Author Keith Baker’s proposal for the exciting world of Eberron was chosen from 11,000 submissions, and he is the co-author of the Eberron Campaign Setting, the RPG product that launched the setting. The Eberron world will continue to grow through new roleplaying game products, novels, miniatures, and electronic games.

©2005 Wizards of the Coast LLC (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

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  •  
    Mister Christopher Snohomish, WA 03-04-13
    Mister Christopher Snohomish, WA 03-04-13 Member Since 2012
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    "Setting the Stage for the World of Eberron"

    The Dreaming Dark series gives the reader a great start into understanding the feel of the Eberron Campaign Setting for Dungeons & Dragons.

    The Series has a pretty linear progression
    The City of Towers takes place in the City of Sharn, introducing the reader to the Warforged, the Dragonmarked Houses.

    The Shattered Land takes the reader to Xend’rik, and uncovers a glimpse into the world of the Eberron Drow.

    The Gates of Night takes this adventure to the Planes and sheds some light on the driving forces of this universe.

    Personally I loved the first book, the City of Sharn is so full of adventure it almost shames all other campaigns I have read about, and I suppose that is why my interest in the series waned as the story moved from this city to uncover the setting as a whole. The adventure gets to be a bit "over the top" especially as it runs into the final book of the series.

    The change in narrator for the 3rd book didn't help with this... at all.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marco Italy 01-23-13
    Marco Italy 01-23-13 Member Since 2014

    Fantasy geek, literature lover!

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Interesting beginning"
    What did you love best about The City of Towers?

    This is an introductory novel to the then new campaign setting for Dungeons & Dragons. Every now and then, mixed with and in explanation of some parts of the plot, there are excursions on the races, societies, and magical aspects of the world. The way the story and the explanations mingle together is well crafted (a long way since the Forgotten Realms and better than Dragonlance).


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The heroes of the story are all interesting. Maybe my favourite is Daine, probably the main male protagonist. I like that way the character has religious doubts and doubts altogether on what to do next, after the Last War. That's the kind of character I like best.


    What three words best describe Alex Hyde-White’s voice?

    Certainly a professional, maybe his voice sounds too "old" for these characters (all young or young-ish). Nice rhythm.


    Any additional comments?

    I'd suggest this book to any D&D geek, like myself, or to anyone who wants a good introduction to fantasy fiction. The narrator has certainly done his job, but I would have preferred a younger voice. He tries to give each character their own unique voice, but sometimes the effect is slightly comical (the warforged and occasionally Lei). Still, the narration is smooth and the audiobook is certainly worth its credit!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David Tunbridge Wells 03-15-13
    David Tunbridge Wells 03-15-13 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "All about the setting."

    I bought this book (and some others), to get a quick crash course on Eberron while stuck working. I was really after color, and setting, maybe some history, but actual plots were not high on my list of priorities. I actually decided to get this one when I found posts by the Author (aka Hellcow) discussing it in an RPG forum topic about Eberron novels. Common consensus was that the end of the trilogy sucked. The auther agreed (ok, he said he'd have done it differently if he'd..yadda yadda,)

    I like Sharn. I like Lorac the disgruntled flying dwarf and the obnoxiously cute goblin girl far more than any of the actual protagonists, who I'd briefly encountered in Tales of the Last War (Get it first!).

    I think I liked the book, but it wasn't a quick listen. Lots of starts and stops. It drags in places, and...

    I'd like to fire the editor with unnatural speed, for the soul-crushing number of times someone or something is described with "unnatural speed". The author clearly inserted that same description with unnatural speed almost as often as he reminded us that Pierce is made of wood and metal. Oh, and they ate nothing but gruel for six months. Get used to hearing that. It's whipped out with unnatural speed, though Pierce doesn't mention it, since he's made of wood and metal.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joshua mcleansville, NC, United States 02-07-15
    Joshua mcleansville, NC, United States 02-07-15 Member Since 2013

    www.newimperium.org

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A New World, a Pleasant Surprise!"

    This book definitely came as a pleasant surprise. Being new to the world of Eberron, I was delighted to discover a world setting for which I had been searching for a long time, one that combines fantasy and sci fi in such a way that opens up huge possibilities for storytelling and worldbuilding. And the setting for this particular tale is even more enthralling - a massive vertical city built upon impossibly tall towers, each housing its own kind of culture from the tops to the depths.

    But all that aside, I was surprised at the quality of the writing from Keith Baker. He definitely brings the world and the character to life in just the right way. That, and the performance of the narrator, made the dialogue sound witty and natural, and the characters burst with life. Also the nature of the story as kind of a detective-type story and not an epic world-shattering event felt very refreshing.

    Another thing that I like about Eberron is the integration of the races. In this world, the traditional evil races such as goblins, orcs, and even medusa are not simply enemies that pop out to try and kill the characters. These races exist in their own pocket of Sharn, with their own societies, and their own rules. Traveling there does not necessarily battle has to occur - although racial tensions still make such an encounter likely. But when battle does occur, it's just as likely to be between a human and dwarf, or some other race. That kind of leveling of the playing field also makes Eberron feel refreshing and interesting.

    I enjoyed this one a lot, and hope to check out the other two books in the series and maybe other books by Keith Baker.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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