We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Leviathan Wakes Audiobook
Leviathan Wakes
Written by: 
James S. A. Corey
Narrated by: 
Jefferson Mays
Leviathan Wakes Audiobook

Leviathan Wakes

Regular Price:$38.49
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

James S.A. Corey delivers compelling SF that ranks with the best in the field. In Leviathan Wakes, ice miner Jim Holden is making a haul from the rings of Saturn when he and his crew encounter an abandoned ship, the Scopuli. Uncovering a terrifying secret, Jim bears the weight of impending catastrophe. At the same time, a detective has been hired by well-heeled parents to find a missing girl, and the investigator’s search leads him right to the Scopuli.

©2011 Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck (P)2011 Recorded Books, LLC

What the Critics Say

“… kickass space opera.” (George R.R. Martin)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (8398 )
5 star
 (4536)
4 star
 (2986)
3 star
 (685)
2 star
 (132)
1 star
 (59)
Overall
4.4 (7659 )
5 star
 (4237)
4 star
 (2528)
3 star
 (710)
2 star
 (118)
1 star
 (66)
Story
4.5 (7663 )
5 star
 (4381)
4 star
 (2566)
3 star
 (574)
2 star
 (98)
1 star
 (44)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Ethan M. Philadelphia 05-11-12
    Ethan M. Philadelphia 05-11-12 Member Since 2005

    On Audible since the late 1990s, mostly science fiction, fantasy, history & science. I rarely review 1-2 star books that I can't get through

    HELPFUL VOTES
    3124
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    162
    112
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    780
    17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Fun hard SF action with a blue collar bent"

    This was really modern science fiction, if not quite up there with the best-of-the-best, it was close. Unusually for hard science fiction, the characters were compelling on their own, and had some nice depth to them. Also somewhat unusually, the characters were not scientists or space marines, but rather a mediocre detective and an intra-stellar freight hauler who get pulled deeper and deeper into the solar-system spanning plot of the book.

    Though it is revealed in the very start of the story (so, no spoiler here!) that there is a first contact element in the book, for the vast majority of the novel, the action is much more human in nature - politics (both interplanetary and interoffice) and lots of action predominate.

    The novel is not the deepest, and I am not entirely sure it adds to the genre or sheds vital insight into the human condition, but there is a lot of fun: murder mysteries, ship-to-ship combat, witty banter, and even old-school horror all make appearances. I'll certainly listen to the next, and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it while you wait for more Peter Hamilton, Alastair Reynolds, or Iain M. Banks novels to be added to Audible.

    74 of 80 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ken Millbrook, New York, United States 08-27-11
    Ken Millbrook, New York, United States 08-27-11 Member Since 2012

    Say something about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    223
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    58
    45
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    40
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Really solid old-school science fiction"

    This is a typical first contact story in many ways, although the mysteries surrounding the alien unfold with interesting twists and turns right up to the end. There are lots of space battles, political intrigue, clever detective work, and solid scientific speculation, all generally well handled. The science is believable, and the social/political backdrop for the story is complex, interesting, and plays an important role in the story. The two authors (Corey is a pseudonym) have crafted two characters each with a point of view on the action as it unfolds (perhaps each author took one of the characters as his alter ego?). They've done this in a way that allows some thoughtful exploration of individual differences in moral perspective on how we might respond to the discovery that there is a vastly older, vastly more sophisticated intelligence out there in the universe. I couldn't quite see my way to giving it five stars because (1) many of the minor characters are indistinguishable in voice and action, (2) too many story elements are cliches -- the evil corporation, navy captain who has a problem with authority, depressive cop traumatized by too many years of seeing the worst of humanity, women who are more manly than the men around them, etc., etc. Nevertheless, the authors manage to bring something original even to many of these cliches, and the overall effect is clever and thoughtful. Even though this is the first book of a planned series, it stands on its own quite well. I will definitely watch for the next book in the series.

    41 of 49 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Russell Keswick, ON, Canada 11-26-15
    Russell Keswick, ON, Canada 11-26-15
    HELPFUL VOTES
    748
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    65
    61
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    125
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Better Start Binge Listening,The Videos are coming"

    I've almost finished book two and so far this is an excellent SF series. The three major powers in this space opera are from Earth, Mars and the outer belt. The Earth/Luna United Nations comprise over 30 billion people. Mars which is in the process of terraforming, has less people but can boast of having the most advanced naval fleet. Finally those in the Outer Planet Alliance are tough adaptable survivors living in a harsh unforgiving environment and they are resentful about being pushed around by their more powerful inner planet cousins.

    Our main protagonists are George Millar, a belter policeman and Jim Holden, an officer on an ice freighter. Miller, who has seen better days is given a task to find the runaway daughter of a powerful earther family who is somewhere out in the belt. Holden and a couple of colorful characters survive the destruction of their ship. It is possible the Martian navy had something to do with it and the righteous Holden goes public with accusations that stir up the three major players into a warlike footing.

    Things go sideways when the Holden and Millar storylines intersect and they discover the missing girl out on Ceres station. It is here where something quite alien and terrifying is thrown into the mix.

    I'm very curious if the video adaptation will do justice to the nightmare my imagination was prodded into producing when experiencing my first taste of the alien replicator molecule. It is being ruthlessly developed by an Earth based company. This life form may have been sent to our solar system in an attempt to hijack our evolution thousands of years ago.... but they missed. Unfortunately we developed space traveling technology and found it

    Maybe mankind shouldn't be experimenting with toys he doesn't understand.

    Sy Fy has committed to ten episodes and the first one is already available as part of the Expanse digital series going straight to TV. If you are like me, you will want to first listen to this book and then move on to the see if a TV series is up to the challenge. Personally I'm happy this is not going to be all crammed into a two hour movie.

    Go ahead - get the first book and step out into the Expanse.

    11 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tango Texas 11-08-13
    Tango Texas 11-08-13

    Two great passions - dogs and books! Sci-fi/fantasy novels are my go-to favorites, but I love good writing across all genres.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    2453
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    710
    154
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    416
    18
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Just didn't engage"

    I found Leviathan Wakes interesting and worth a credit, but just not engaging enough that I will buy the sequels. As much as I like sci-fi, I only LOVE it when the other aspects of good fiction are in play - great characters, plot, setting, and strong prose and LW is a little lacking. The plot is pretty interesting and there is a good mystery incorporated into it; the settings are quite vivid. But the strong plot/setting didn't quite make up for the stereotype characters (brash, young rebel and world weary detective), wooden dialog, and rather pedestrian prose for me. Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck working as James S. A. Corey have produced a work that is creditable and reasonably cohesive, but maybe damped them both down a bit; both can actually write with more flare than you see in LW.

    The narration and pacing is good, but I still found myself anxious to get to the end because I just didn't care much what happened to these characters. If you enjoy a lot of action sequences (the book includes many scenes of physical fights and spaceship battles), you might find the mundane characters and the stolid prose less problematic.

    46 of 58 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 03-10-12
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 03-10-12 Member Since 2005

    Gen-Xer, software engineer, and lifelong avid reader. Soft spots for sci-fi, fantasy, and history, but I'll read anything good.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    2521
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    370
    305
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    524
    14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A solid science fiction beach read"

    An entertainingly old-fashioned space thriller, which I might describe as “Alien meets Firefly meets Richard K. Morgan”. As in the classic Ridley Scott movie, the authors create a lively sense of regular Joe and Jane humans living in the grimy, mechanical confines of spaceships and stations. Throw in some hard-boiled cop story elements and a charismatic, obedience-averse young ship captain and his rag-tag crew, and you get the Richard K. Morgan and Firefly similarities.

    While there’s little in this book that isn’t a well-worn science fiction trope, the technological stuff feels realistic and the familiar human characters might appeal to readers weary of the powered-up post-human protagonists that populate other hard SF novels these days. Add some cracklingly good space battles, a mystery, and characters caught up in politics larger than themselves, and you have a science fiction thriller that is, if not exactly innovative, more readable than Alastair Reynolds.

    20 of 25 people found this review helpful
  •  
    wendy NJ 10-28-11
    wendy NJ 10-28-11 Member Since 2010

    Tell us about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    298
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    102
    43
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    30
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting debut"
    Would you listen to Leviathan Wakes again? Why?

    It was a nice listen. I did like the world that the authors evoked (For those who don't know, James S.A. Corey is a pseudonym for 2 authors), and the characters were decent. I don't know that I really cared deeply about them at the end, but the action is so non stop that you get pulled along regardless.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    My favorite character is the one who is seen the least amount - Julie


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    Blockbuster deep space adventure!


    Any additional comments?

    I'll definitely download the sequel when it comes out - I hear it's planned for late spring 2012.

    22 of 28 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 05-31-12 Member Since 2016

    I value intelligent stories with characters I can relate to. I can appreciate good prose, but a captivating plot is way more important.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    829
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    205
    167
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    34
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A Mixed Bag"

    The good:

    The quality of the writing was very good; dialog was realistic and natural and the descriptions were thorough without being overwhelming. The author generated suspense nicely (though not what I would call masterfully), and the plot was engaging throughout- with only a couple of dry spots towards the beginning.

    The bad:

    Corey (the author) has created a universe and backstory that suggest an epic scope- but unfortunately his relatively small cast of characters are not enough to populate the a story of the size he wants to fill. So rather than SHOWING us the various aspects of life in his futuristic solar system, he TELLS us about the back story in an encyclopedic fashion that feels like a dry history lesson. I suggest that he examine George R.R. Martin's Game of Thrones to see how a vast and rich backstory can be doled out at appropriate times, by making sure that all the history shared is relevant to the story and in such a way that the readers have a vested interest in knowing that backstory at the time it is being shared.

    One writing device which bothered me a lot was the detective constantly seeing/talking to a girl who wasn't there. This is not an uncommon device, and a cringe whenever I read it, because I wonder if the author is implying that the character is literally hallucinating or if we're just getting a weird view of their imagination. It is a weak crutch to show us the inner thoughts of one of the main characters, and I wish the author had made a different choice.

    Lack of scientific progress was also a major problem in this novel. We are set in the distant future, but Corey doesn't dazzle us with any time-appropriate technology outside of the genre cliches.

    [mild spoiler in this paragraph:]

    The plot itself is interesting, but suffers from a common problem: The bad guys are too evil. They're also too stupid for words. It's the same old sci-fi cliche where a powerful organization tries to harness a weapon that OBVIOUSLY defies human control. We've seen this in the Alien movies, in the Fifth Element, the Fly II, etc, etc.

    [/end spoiler]

    Conclusion:

    I am left with mixed feelings about this book. I don't feel that it was a waste of time... but I also don't feel terribly compelled to continue with the rest of the series as it comes out.

    24 of 31 people found this review helpful
  •  
    troy Texas 10-11-12
    troy Texas 10-11-12 Member Since 2013

    I really need to start proof reading my Reviews before I post them.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    151
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    116
    38
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    32
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "comforting sci-fi adventure"

    This is a comforting sci-fi adventure. By comforting, I mean that this is a sci-fi adventure that has some solid world building and a plot that really feels like it needs to be told. I enjoy the cultural and economic principles that were introduced. I also really liked how a lot of effort was put into the description of the spaceships.

    I wasn't ready for this story to end, when the final chapter came up. I am really glad that this is a book series, and that I get to return to it's universe when Audible Credit Day comes around again in a few weeks.

    I recommend this book.

    p.s. tentacles

    8 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lore SAN JOSE, CA, United States 07-28-12
    Lore SAN JOSE, CA, United States 07-28-12 Member Since 2008

    Fantasy/Sci-Fi Fan

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1729
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    209
    131
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    898
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent start to the series."

    James S. A. Corey (who is really 2 different authors that take turns writing chapters) makes the arrangement between the two of them work out well. The book starts with the 2 different authors' styles being apparent and then blends them nicely together as the book goes on.

    The future, as presented in this book, finds mankind having achieved space tavel to the planets within the solar system, but not having reached out into the stars. Access to additional planets and resources does little to unite humanity and now mankind has a new way to discriminate against each other - based on where in the solar system one lives.

    There is a tenuous peace that exists between Earth, Mars and the outer planets and it is within this fragile environment that the discovery of an ancient alien weapon sparks a higher level of conflict. The tale is well told and you never really know who exactly is behind the key events raising the level of tension and increasing the likelihood of war.

    There is nothing extraordinarily unique about such a tale, but this one is well written and it keeps you entertained. The book also ends in a good place, wrapping up this initial story well and whetting your appetite for what comes next.

    Jefferson Mays does an excellent job on the narration.

    12 of 16 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Frank Lawrence 09-01-11 Member Since 2014

    Cougar

    HELPFUL VOTES
    107
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    913
    47
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    21
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Superb first story"

    This is the first in a series of books and it is excellent! Corey has done a superb job and the narration is spot on. The story includes mystery, intrigue, futuristic thinking, and psychological hooks that keep you coming back for more. You will not want to stop listening once you start this book and that is one of the key qualities I look for in any audio experience. I highly recommend this book. I can'
    t wait for the next installment.

    16 of 22 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.