The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future Audiobook | Joseph E. Stiglitz | Audible.com
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The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future | [Joseph E. Stiglitz]

The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future

The top 1 percent of Americans control 40 percent of the nation's wealth. And, as Joseph E. Stiglitz explains, while those at the top enjoy the best health care, education, and benefits of wealth, they fail to realize that "their fate is bound up with how the other 99 percent live." Stiglitz draws on his deep understanding of economics to show that growing inequality is not inevitable. He examines our current state, then teases out its implications for democracy, for monetary and budgetary policy, and for globalization. He closes with a plan for a more just and prosperous future.
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Publisher's Summary

The top 1 percent of Americans control 40 percent of the nation's wealth. And, as Joseph E. Stiglitz explains, while those at the top enjoy the best health care, education, and benefits of wealth, they fail to realize that "their fate is bound up with how the other 99 percent live."

Stiglitz draws on his deep understanding of economics to show that growing inequality is not inevitable: moneyed interests compound their wealth by stifling true, dynamic capitalism. They have made America the most unequal advanced industrial country while crippling growth, trampling on the rule of law, and undermining democracy. The result: a divided society that cannot tackle its most pressing problems. With characteristic insight, Stiglitz examines our current state, then teases out its implications for democracy, for monetary and budgetary policy, and for globalization. He closes with a plan for a more just and prosperous future.

©2012 Joseph E. Stiglitz (P)2012 Tantor

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  •  
    Grant NANTUCKET, MA, United States 10-15-12
    Grant NANTUCKET, MA, United States 10-15-12

    caffeinated

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    "Dense, but important."

    Yes, I agree with everything in this book. Those who are hooked on the idea of austerity and tax cuts will find it annoying and will search their hearts for ways to deny its ideas. Conformation bias is working overtime these days on both sides of the political spectrum.

    It's human nature to choose winners and losers and to cheer for the winners. This is what it has come down to in our society. Unfortunately, this rather short-sighted way of approaching our world means that the winners walk away with most of the wealth.

    This book is dense in places and I really need to re-rlisten when my head is not spinning with Obama vs. Romney rhetoric. Which I will do soon. But until then, suffice it to say, the ideas Stiglitz puts forth for making government an agent of economic growth are spot on, but incredibly hard to implement in this political climate. I think we need another mutual enemy now that the cold war is over and Bin Laden is dead. All we have to fight against is ourselves at the moment. And it sickens me.

    16 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael Walnut Creek, CA, United States 08-08-12
    Michael Walnut Creek, CA, United States 08-08-12

    I focus on fiction, sci-fi, fantasy, science, history, politics and read a lot. I try to review everything I read.

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    "One side is never enough...."

    There is a fundamental question about inequality this book fails to address. How much inequality is the right amount? Clearly some inequality is both unavoidable and necessary for innovation. This book seems to take the position that the amount of inequality we have now is way too much, but does not propose a goal equality level. I agree that inequality is a bit high, and is getting higher as corporations and the very rich are no longer paying a fair share mostly using loopholes. Nevertheless, I find many of the author’s proposed solutions way over the crazy line. Extending unemployment payments for long periods (do you know people holding off getting a job just in case unemployment is extended again; I do), increasing federal taxes on families earning more than $270K to 70% (history shows this will not work). Stopping investments in productivity (the author phrased it as not investing in labor saving instead invest only in resource saving). Matching the savings of the poor (such policies would be played and end up counter-productive).

    It seems the author thinks poor people who were “exploited” by being given homes and a mortgages for which they should never have qualified should now get their mortgages restructured into something they can afford.

    The author rages against monopoly powers and do nothing exploiters like Steve Jobs. I found these arguments very poorly supported.

    My favorite line was if we follow the author’s recommendations “many more people will have a shot of one day being in the 1%”. Of course, the top 1% will always be 1%. So to increase the 1% we would need to do a 15 minutes of richness kind of deal. The author also mentions education and legal reform without stating any real proposals.

    I did agree with the author on a few things. I am also a strong supporter of the estate tax (I think it should be called the slutty heiress tax, not a death tax) and I strongly agree that existing tax loopholes, earmarks, and pork are out of control and related to unsustainable growth in inequality. I never like one sided books that use one side of statistics to make a point (especially when they are making a point I agree with)!

    38 of 56 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Johannes ASTORIA, NY, United States 03-08-13
    Johannes ASTORIA, NY, United States 03-08-13 Member Since 2010
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    "Poor narration, important topic"
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    Like always, Stiglitz is a bit lopsided, but he makes a lot of very valid points. What is really annoying about this audiobook is the narration. Paul Boehmer's voice has the soothing, yet emotionally detached air of a spaceship's articifical intelligence computer, which in some settings might work well, but not in this audiobook which makes a passionate normative appeal for equality.


    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dan D. Dunlap California 06-16-12
    Dan D. Dunlap California 06-16-12

    I'm a freethinker with a never ending desire to learn! Born a Texan, a Californian by choice.

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    "A Book Every American Should Read"
    What made the experience of listening to The Price of Inequality the most enjoyable?

    Although this book is full of economic facts, it's easy to understand. After listing to this offering, you will understand why the author won a Nobel Prize in economics. I highly recommend this to anyone interested in knowing more about how the inequality in our economy is hurting this country in multiple ways.


    What other book might you compare The Price of Inequality to and why?

    End The Depression Now!, by Paul Krugman


    What does Paul Boehmer bring to the story that you wouldn???t experience if you just read the book?

    Mr. Boehmer made listening to this book a pleasure!


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I particularly found the author's concluding comments thought provoking.


    Any additional comments?

    If you purchase this book you will not regret your decision!

    14 of 22 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Thomas Chicago, IL, United States 06-16-12
    Thomas Chicago, IL, United States 06-16-12 Member Since 2004

    I struggled in the sixties to get a college education, barely graduated, spent a life in the phone company as a technician in a call center.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Wow!"
    Any additional comments?

    Well-researched, well-written, well-read. The book covers every important area of the USA that is in the current events, every major problem of the existing democracy, every cause of the problems, and gives many good solutions.

    11 of 18 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeb CINCINNATI, OH, United States 09-17-12
    Jeb CINCINNATI, OH, United States 09-17-12
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    "Important and clearly presented"

    Stiglitz lays out a compelling view of our increasingly unequal society. Causes, implications, and how we might address the problems are discussed with clarity. While this issues from the "liberal" side of the political spectrum - it is one to read if a balanced view of our current political debate is desired.

    4 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Benjamin Silver Spring, MD, United States 03-26-14
    Benjamin Silver Spring, MD, United States 03-26-14

    Likes to listen while doing chores; likes to write reviews while he should be doing chores.

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    "Probably Better on Paper"

    Books like this one, presumably with charts and tables, are probably better with another medium. However, if you are going to listen to it as I did, it still does a pretty good job. Economic principles are pretty clearly explained, though if it is your first introduction to economics, you will probably want to look a few things up (moral hazard, market failures etc.), but he does't bury you in a mountain of technical language.

    As Stiglitz disclaims early, this is not a work for peer review. It is for popular consumption so if you are looking for some deep explanation as to how he arrived at his claims, you'll be left wanting.

    I am usually frustrated with books that prescribe solutions that we "merely lack the political will," to accomplish. It seems like activist thumb-twiddling. Every book of this type seems to have a portion like that. This one is no exception. I find the repetition of this trope frustrating.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    patrick MACON, GA, United States 03-24-14
    patrick MACON, GA, United States 03-24-14 Member Since 2013
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    "Progressive drivel"
    What would have made The Price of Inequality better?

    It's a shame that the author spent time writing this book to document his covetousness instead of writing an essay on how to thrive in what's left of our capitalist economy. That would have been a much more worthwhile read, and may have actually benefited a reader.


    Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Paul Boehmer?

    The narrator was adequate. I have no problem with his performance.


    What character would you cut from The Price of Inequality?

    The middle class is mentioned frequently in this book. The author constantly advocates for the poor and the middle class, yet he never offers to define which people belong in these "classes". How are those classes to align themselves against the rich if the author never makes that distinction?


    Any additional comments?

    The author bored this reader. He offers the same tired progressive theories in favor of income redistribution, envy of the rich, and trying to incite class envy in the reader. He points to the fact that some Americans have more wealth than others, therefore some immoral act must have been committed to make it so. Since the results of our work bear differing rewards, he proposes American capitalism must be tinkered with (more regulation) until all Americans have equal wealth and pay (but for effort that may differ wildly). I have news for the author and the reader. Socialist countries propose to level the income among citizens. But even in socialist and communist countries there is widespread wealth inequality. Grinding poverty is widespread in those countries and the inequalities are forced arbitrarily on the citizens, and the victims cannot escape. But even the poorest Americans live better than most people in the world. I would say that the author would benefit greatly in his perspective by taking an extended vacation to somewhere like North Korea, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Cuba, Laos, Viet Nam, China, or any such country where they have solved all these problems with inequality. Perhaps he could hold a peaceful protest outside Kim Jong Un's palace, denouncing him for wealth disparity between himself and his comrades (subjects). I would love to read about that experience.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jenn Las Vegas, NV, United States 03-04-14
    Jenn Las Vegas, NV, United States 03-04-14
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    "An Excellent and Insightful Analysis"
    What did you love best about The Price of Inequality?

    Accessible to both the academic and layperson, this book critiques American political economy, the devastating and anti-democratic effects of our vast inequality, and outlines corrective measures that could be taken.


    What other book might you compare The Price of Inequality to and why?

    If you liked Krugman's "Conscience of a Liberal" or "End this Depression Now," you will likely enjoy this book.


    What about Paul Boehmer’s performance did you like?

    The reading is well-done and lively--no droning monotone here.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jason RENTON, WA, United States 02-05-14
    Jason RENTON, WA, United States 02-05-14 Member Since 2013
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    "Clear information, clear suggestions"
    What did you love best about The Price of Inequality?

    As the author states, the ideas and data are presented in ways so as to allow readers of all levels of economic understanding to enjoy and gain from this book.


    What does Paul Boehmer bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Paul does a fantastic job reading the book. He is quite enjoyable to listen to.


    Any additional comments?

    The author presents data, and also presents suggestions. The idea that the author wants to raise taxes to 70% is absurd. He simply states that some economists have said that mathematically that would be a realistic amount and that at that percentage, the top earners would still do fine. Contrary to what some reviews on here have said, he is not suggesting actually doing that.

    What the author does suggest is that, while the government isn't perfect (people are fallible) and corporations are not perfect (the market is entirely fallible), minor adjustments are needed in a civilized society to make sure the market behaves properly and functions for the good of more, not less people. This idea is not radicle. This idea is also not unproven.

    The key to the authors suggestions are just that, MINOR adjustments. Nothing radical at all about that. And nothing that ordinary, logical people could not agree with.

    The author shows, that if you are voting for people who pretend to care about you so they can keep more of what they earn (and trickle down to you as if more supply will equal more demand) you are doing so at great cost to yourself, your society, and your country.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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