The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves Audiobook | Dan Ariely | Audible.com
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The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves | [Dan Ariely]

The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves

Does the chance of getting caught affect how likely we are to cheat? How do companies pave the way for dishonesty? Does collaboration make us more honest or less so? Does religion improve our honesty? Most of us think of ourselves as honest, but, in fact, we all cheat. From Washington to Wall Street, the classroom to the workplace, unethical behavior is everywhere. None of us is immune whether it's the white lie to head off trouble or padding our expense reports.
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Publisher's Summary

This program is enhanced with 14 never-before-heard episodes of Dan Ariely's "Arming the Donkeys" podcast, available exclusively on this audiobook!

The New York Times bestselling author of Predictably Irrational and The Upside of Irrationality returns with thought-provoking work to challenge our preconceptions about dishonesty and urge us to take an "honest" look at ourselves.

Does the chance of getting caught affect how likely we are to cheat? How do companies pave the way for dishonesty? Does collaboration make us more honest or less so? Does religion improve our honesty?

Most of us think of ourselves as honest, but, in fact, we all cheat. From Washington to Wall Street, the classroom to the workplace, unethical behavior is everywhere. None of us is immune, whether it's the white lie to head off trouble or padding our expense reports. In The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty, award-winning, bestselling author Dan Ariely turns his unique insight and innovative research to the question of dishonesty.

Generally, we assume that cheating, like most other decisions, is based on a rational cost-benefit analysis. But Ariely argues, and then demonstrates, that it's actually the irrational forces that we don't take into account that often determine whether we behave ethically or not. For every Enron or political bribe, there are countless hidden commissions, and knockoff purses.

In The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty, Ariely shows why some things are easier to lie about; how getting caught matters less than we think; and how business practices pave the way for unethical behavior, both intentionally and unintentionally. Ariely explores how unethical behavior works in the personal, professional, and political worlds, and how it affects all of us, even as we think of ourselves as having high moral standards.

But all is not lost. Ariely also identifies what keeps us honest, pointing the way for achieving higher ethics in our everyday lives. With compelling personal and academic findings, The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty will change the way we see ourselves, our actions, and others.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2012 Dan Ariely (P)2012 HarperCollins Publishers

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  •  
    Doug Belmont, MA, United States 07-02-12
    Doug Belmont, MA, United States 07-02-12 Member Since 2010

    Entrepreneur, marketer, Zen Buddhist.

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    "You Cheat (and I Do Too)"

    Dan Ariely's "Honest Truth About Dishonesty" is a nice divergence from his earlier books on irrationality, and contains much more original psychological research than these books. If you've enjoyed his prior books, you'll enjoy this one.

    Ariely's books are all connected by the theme of how it is that we fool ourselves. In this work, Ariely shows that we're fooling ourselves and others just a little bit, almost all of the time through a number of clever experiments. What's particularly interesting is that Ariely finds that this cheating is not driven by cost/benefit tradeoffs -- the generally accepted rationale for why people cheat -- but, as in keeping with Ariely's prior work, cheating is found to be driven by less rational motivations. Changes in cost/benefit do matter, but opportunities for rationalization, the effect of social norms, and cognitive dissonance are at least equally important.

    I don't know why Ariely keeps choosing Simon Jones to read his books. Jones is a great reader, but in a strongly British theatrical manner. Ariely, whom you'll get to hear in podcasts appended to the end of the book, or whom you may have heard on a TED talk, speaks American English with an Israeli accent. Further, the places Ariely writes about are almost always either in the US or Israel and almost never in England. If you know what the author sounds like, Jones seems to be a strange choice.

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Emily Earth 12-29-12
    Emily Earth 12-29-12 Member Since 2010
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    "Disappointed"

    I am a huge fan of Dan Ariely. I have read his previous two books (predictably irrational) multiple times and recommended them to friends and co-workers. And he continues that same work in this book by describing the experiments he's done that deal mostly with honesty. Many of the experiments are repeats from what he has described in previous books -- which was okay with me, because I like to hear about them again.

    If he had stuck with the same format as his previous books and described his clinical work only, that would have been best. But, he goes on to offer explanations of why he thinks people are dishonest and of course, none of that can be supported with any evidence.

    And he makes some pretty big leaps to conclusions on why people do what they do in the experiments he conducts. It's one thing to measure the outcome, but his conclusions (while put forth as speculation) are not based on anything but his own reasoning and logic. Which may turn out to be true, but the fact is there is no way (at this time) to determine the "why" and just because that's what he thinks does not make it so.

    (ie - the sun rises around the same time each morning. Good, we've established this as a fact. Now, for the why...well because it's driven by a god in a charriot, of course. At least that's what some people believed thousands of years ago, but that didn't make it true.)

    We have no way of knowing why people cheat and lie. Yes, he can measure that we do and that it gets worse or better under different conditions, but it's a big, big leap from that place to saying they do it because of X. There is no way to know X. At least not at this time. So he shouldn't speculate -- even when he doesn't state it as a fact it still comes off as if he's sure he's got the right answer for the why.

    8 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carl West Palm Beach, FL, United States 08-21-12
    Carl West Palm Beach, FL, United States 08-21-12 Member Since 2001
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    "Another Wonderful Dan Ariely Book"

    First I would like to say that the reader is great. Whenever a English accented reader is needed he should be the first one chosen because he has the flavor needed without the difficulty to understand.

    Anyway I love all Dan Ariely's books. In many ways they are similar to "Freakenomics" but I tend to like them a bit better because they seem to me to be scientific in their conclusions... although both are great.

    This book about honesty is something we all need to think about and it makes me wonder if humans can ever really be honest.

    The one shortcoming in the book is basicallly talking about lying to ourselves he never goes into religion. For example Christians claim to follow Jesus yet he primarily preached sharing all we have with others... particularly the poor... which is something few do. Modern Christians today mainly attack abortion and gays which is something Jesus never preached against yet the main thing he did preach is largely ignored. Not trying to pick on Christians because the same contradictions (lies) are found in all religions.

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Elly Meeker, CO, United States 08-30-12
    Elly Meeker, CO, United States 08-30-12 Member Since 2011
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    "Relevent information"
    Would you consider the audio edition of The Honest Truth About Dishonesty to be better than the print version?

    The audio edition of The Honest Truth About Dishonesty is better than the print version only in that it makes the information all that more accessible to me...I've discovered that I'm an aural learner.


    Any additional comments?

    This book was highly interesting to me because all of the little studies that Ariely conducted dealt directly with how I behave and how I observe others behaving on a daily basis. As I was reading it, I became acutely aware of how, like most people according to Ariely, I continually rationalize cheating in my own life. This book is thought provoking and kind of fun too. I recommend it.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Terry Nelson, British Columbia, Canada 10-07-12
    Terry Nelson, British Columbia, Canada 10-07-12 Member Since 2003
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    "Can we control our lying?"
    Where does The Honest Truth About Dishonesty rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    This book is incredibly thought- provoking! I love books that developer or change the way I see the world or my life. This book achieves that in a way that kept my attention. Because of that I see as a must listen to book. It is my favourite book at this moment. I now hove lots of books I think are the best I've listened to so it's hard to say its my favourite as it may be a lie.

    I'm glad I bought it.


    What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

    The narrator keeps the story moving. At the end of the book there are interviews conducted by the author. The author has a different accent.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    This book makes you consider the subtleties of being truthful and honest and the many unconscious, reasons for dishonesty. The book shows how mass deception can be acceptable in organizations such as Enron and in our governments.

    The author does many social experiments and many of the outcomes are counter-intuitive. Those findings were the most provocative part of the book.

    I also enjoyed the end of the book where the author let us listen to interviews with others he collaborated with in the formulation of his findings expressed in the book.


    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeanette Bellevue, Washington 07-06-13
    Jeanette Bellevue, Washington 07-06-13 Member Since 2011
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    "Food for thought!"

    I have enjoyed all of Dan Ariely's books and this one was no exception. It was interesting to read how we are all a little dishonest at some point or another. I found it fun spouting the research in this book to family and friends who insist they never lie or cheat. You will definitely learn more about how society behaves but I think, more importantly, you'll get a better understanding how you sometimes behave.

    I know others don't like the English narrator but I think he is perfect for the job and narrates with a wonderful sense of irony.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Linda Holladay, UT, United States 02-25-13
    Linda Holladay, UT, United States 02-25-13 Member Since 2007

    Utah Granny who loves to knit, golf, do genealogy, cook, garden, read and be with family. Yes, I am a Mormon and glad to be.

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    "I liked it, honestly!"

    I an not a sociologist or researcher so am coming strictly from a lay opinion. The conclusions were mostly taken from research with college students which made me wonder if the results would have been be different if the general public was tested. Each test situation made me think what I would do in similar circumstances.

    I am a golfer so especially related to the tests with golfers. i.e.: the farther away one is from the ball the more likely you are to bump or place the ball in a better lie. More golfers would bump the ball with a golf club than would lift it with their hand. The questions were posed for their friends and themselves. Most thought their friends would be more likely to cheat than they themselves.

    The book explored the likelihood of cheating when being observed, when in a group, after taking an oath not to cheat, when religious principles are involved or when money was involved to name a few.

    I thought it was very interesting and worth the read. I think I will read it again soon with a pencil and paper in hand with which to take notes.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    KHimself Norfolk, VA 12-09-12
    KHimself Norfolk, VA 12-09-12

    Khimself

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    "Educational"

    I truly enjoy this book, and recommend it. One will enjoy it more than a fictional book and, one might be surprise the things one learns from it. The book reveals a true aspect of human nature and how we have a tendency to cheat and justify our actions. It is a requiem of tests/experiences in behavioral sciences. For a scientific mind, it is food for the soul.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lisa Redlands, CA, United States 10-03-12
    Lisa Redlands, CA, United States 10-03-12 Member Since 2007
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    "If it's Dan Ariely you know it's good"

    Dan Ariely is a fascinating researcher who can make what seems to be esoteric scholarship into an immediate and fascinating discussion. I think I enjoyed The Upside of Irrationality and Predictably Irrational better, but perhaps all research begins to repeat itself which makes its dazzle a little less brilliant. However, it is still insightful, with "a-ha" moments, and is worth a listen.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J. Drabick Washington, DC 09-10-12
    J. Drabick Washington, DC 09-10-12
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    "Excellent Book -- Makes You Think"
    Would you listen to The Honest Truth About Dishonesty again? Why?

    Very engaging, with "wow" moments time and again. Would definitely read again - I may even buy a hard copy just so can flip to for reference in the future. Highly recommend.


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
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