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Salt Sugar Fat Audiobook

Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us

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Audible Editor Reviews

Editors Select, February 2013 - I’m going to go ahead and predict that Salt Sugar Fat will be the biggest exposé to hit the food industry since Fast Food Nation. Intelligently and lucidly written (by a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, no less), this book is going to make serious waves. It’s already causing mini-waves in my own home as I frantically figure out what in the world to stock my cupboard with. In Salt Sugar Fat we meet the major players inside the processed food industry, as well as learning about all the things that they understand about human nature that the average person doesn’t. Quite simply, we are built to crave salt, sugar, and fat, and the big food companies make sure they deliver it cheaply and by the truckload. You’ll never view food – and your relationship with it – the same again. —Emily, Audible Editor

Publisher's Summary

From a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter at The New York Times comes the explosive story of the rise of the processed food industry and its link to the emerging obesity epidemic. Michael Moss reveals how companies use salt, sugar, and fat to addict us and, more important, how we can fight back.

Every year, the average American eats 33 pounds of cheese (triple what we ate in 1970) and 70 pounds of sugar (about 22 teaspoons a day). We ingest 8,500 milligrams of salt a day, double the recommended amount, and almost none of that comes from the shakers on our table. It comes from processed food. It’s no wonder, then, that one in three adults, and one in five kids, is clinically obese. It’s no wonder that 26 million Americans have diabetes, the processed food industry in the U.S. accounts for $1 trillion a year in sales, and the total economic cost of this health crisis is approaching $300 billion a year.

In Salt Sugar Fat, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Michael Moss shows how we got here. Featuring examples from some of the most recognizable (and profitable) companies and brands of the last half century - including Kraft, Coca-Cola, Lunchables, Kellogg, Nestlé, Oreos, Cargill, Capri Sun, and many more - Moss’s explosive, empowering narrative is grounded in meticulous, often eye-opening research.

Moss takes us inside the labs where food scientists use cutting-edge technology to calculate the "bliss point" of sugary beverages or enhance the "mouthfeel" of fat by manipulating its chemical structure. He unearths marketing campaigns designed - in a technique adapted from tobacco companies - to redirect concerns about the health risks of their products: Dial back on one ingredient, pump up the other two, and tout the new line as "fat-free" or "low-salt". He talks to concerned executives who confess that they could never produce truly healthy alternatives to their products even if serious regulation became a reality. Simply put: The industry itself would cease to exist without salt, sugar, and fat. Just as millions of "heavy users" - as the companies refer to their most ardent customers - are addicted to this seductive trio, so too are the companies that peddle them. You will never look at a nutrition label the same way again.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2013 Michael Moss (P)2013 Random House Audio

What the Critics Say

"What happens when one of the country’s great investigative reporters infiltrates the most disastrous cartel of modern times: a processed food industry that’s making a fortune by slowly poisoning an unwitting population? You get this terrific, powerfully written book, jammed with startling disclosures, jaw-dropping confessions and, importantly, the charting of a path to a better, healthier future. This book should be read by anyone who tears a shiny wrapper and opens wide. That’s all of us." (Ron Suskind, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President)

"In this meticulously researched book, Michael Moss tells the chilling story of how the food giants have seduced everyone in this country. He understands a vital and terrifying truth: that we are not just eating fast food when we succumb to the siren song of sugar, fat, and salt. We are fundamentally changing our lives - and the world around us.” (Alice Waters)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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Performance
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  •  
    wang ping 08-18-16
    wang ping 08-18-16 Member Since 2011
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    "Great research and writing."

    A report of conscience and power and bravery and tenacity! I recommend it whole heartedly.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Ron 08-09-16
    Ron 08-09-16 Member Since 2012
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    "A must read"

    From the beginning it held my interest explaining the history of snack foods and why they are purposfuly addictive. A fair assessment in the efforts of manufacturers attempt at healthier snacks vs profit. Very eye opening even to a health conscience person. I recommend to anyone who believes there is such thing as healthy chips.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Scarlet O Harry 08-08-16
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    4
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    "Warning: You will crave Oreos"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    This is an informative look at the food industry, and I listened to encourage myself to stick to my low carb diet. Unfortunately, listening did the opposite: I found myself craving many of the chemical-laden foods the book chronicles. While I only cheated on my diet once (with a tiny pack of Smarties, not a package of Double Stuffed Oreos), I need to warn others that the constant references to junk food made the listening experience an exercise in willpower.


    Have you listened to any of Scott Brick’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Brick is a good narrator, but his style is better suited to fiction as opposed to non-fiction. I found his intonations a bit over-dramatic at times.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeffrey Nelsen Springfield, IL 08-04-16
    Jeffrey Nelsen Springfield, IL 08-04-16

    kindle lover

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    "Eye opening"

    Thought I knew a lot about processed food already. But Michael Moss showed me I did not. Scott Brick is an outstanding narrator as well. Very helpful and informative!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Huckleberry Denver, CO 08-03-16
    Huckleberry Denver, CO 08-03-16 Member Since 2016
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    "Simply Brilliant"

    Brilliant book about the state of "food" in America and a very compelling listen. One of the most well written and well performed non -fiction books I have ever read. Also, whether on accident or on purpose, this is one of the best and easiest to understand pieces of writing on the fact that a free market economy in the US is a fallacy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dan 07-29-16
    Dan 07-29-16 Member Since 2015
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    "Did not like narration style"

    The narration style is more appropriate for 1950s public service announcement then to narrating a book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    cara 07-26-16
    cara 07-26-16
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    "Couldn't get past the pompous narration."
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    I don't think anyone would enjoy this.


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    I couldn't tell exactly, because of the awful narration, but most of the book read like an advertisement instead of actual investigatory journalism. In addition, I could really do without the fat shaming - it doesn't help anyone. I appreciated the historical aspects, though, and wish I could read more about it all.


    Would you be willing to try another one of Scott Brick’s performances?

    Absolutely not. He has such a condescending tone that it made it impossible to actually get through this book. Maybe he's better in fiction books or mysteries, but that does NOT mean he's good for these kind of investigative books. He has an irritatingly mocking tone and makes the book seem super judgmental and not credible. I couldn't sit through all almost 15 hours of him talking - he makes any respectable story sound like a joke.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    No.


    Any additional comments?

    I wish I could get this book with a different narrator, so I could judge it more fairly.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Luke 07-24-16
    Luke 07-24-16 Member Since 2015
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    "Misleading title, business antidotes, misses the point"

    This book isn't really about salt, sugar or fat. And it's attempts to describe health issues regarding these ingredients is very dated and poorly done. What this book is good at though it telling some mediocrely interesting tales of the processed food industry. I would rate this book higher if it stuck to that, but the inaccurate disease attributions to specific types of food or these ingredients misses the big picture of the processing itself not the nutritionist perspective this book focuses on. The author would benefit greatly from the quick read "in defense of food" by Michael Pollan. I don't think I could recommend salt sugar fat as a worth while listen or read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael 07-20-16
    Michael 07-20-16 Member Since 2015
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    "Amazing"

    A must read for all those who are confused about why the grocery stores look the way they do and why we eat the way we eat.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    PKsweets CA 07-12-16
    PKsweets CA 07-12-16 Member Since 2004

    A reader from day 1 now a listener too! Remember honesty in a review does help you decide, even if you don't agree!

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    "Valuable info for Everyone!"
    What made the experience of listening to Salt Sugar Fat the most enjoyable?

    Scott Brick Narration of course, smoothly giving the info with the right tone and inflections.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    no characters, unless you count the corporate 'think' exposed here, and the need to be vigilant in your purchasing choices!


    Have you listened to any of Scott Brick’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    yes.... but novel only, this was a first non-fiction listen for me, and again he is amazing!


    What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

    Even the corporate bigwigs won't buy their own stuff for their families..... seriously!


    Any additional comments?

    A lot of info, and even if you only absorb a small amount, it will be a beneficial listen! I can see a second listen in my future on this one.....

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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