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The Valley of Fear: A Sherlock Holmes Novel | [Sir Arthur Conan Doyle]

The Valley of Fear: A Sherlock Holmes Novel

In The Valley of Fear, the great detective Sherlock Holmes has been summoned by a coded message to the house of a man called Douglas. But he and his faithful friend Dr. Watson arrive to find they are too late---Douglas has been murdered, with a mysterious calling card left by his side. Scotland Yard is stumped, but Holmes, detecting the diabolical workings of his arch-enemy Professor Moriarty, has some ideas of his own.
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Publisher's Summary

In The Valley of Fear, the great detective Sherlock Holmes has been summoned by a coded message to the house of a man called Douglas. But he and his faithful friend Dr. Watson arrive to find they are too late---Douglas has been murdered, with a mysterious calling card left by his side. Scotland Yard is stumped, but Holmes, detecting the diabolical workings of his arch-enemy Professor Moriarty, has some ideas of his own. Central to the novel lies the story of a terrorist brotherhood and the hold it acquired over an American mining valley.

This audiobook includes the bonus Sherlock Holmes story "The Final Problem."

©1923 Public Domain; (P)2009 Tantor

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.2 (50 )
5 star
 (23)
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 (14)
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 (11)
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Overall
4.0 (30 )
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 (14)
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 (6)
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Story
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  •  
    Jefferson Fukuoka, Japan 01-04-12
    Jefferson Fukuoka, Japan 01-04-12 Member Since 2010

    I love listening to or reading books--especially fantasy, science fiction, children's, classics, & historical.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    162
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    22
    22
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    86
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An Uninspired Holmes & Garish American Gangsters"

    The Valley of Fear, the last Sherlock Holmes novel, begins promisingly, with Holmes and Watson trying to solve a murder mystery at a country manor and firing off some great lines, as when Holmes upbraids Watson with a dumbbell: “One dumb-bell, Watson! Consider an athlete with one dumb-bell! Picture to yourself the unilateral development, the imminent danger of a spinal curvature. Shocking, Watson, shocking!”

    But finally the novel is disappointing. Despite the skills and gravelly gravitas of reader Simon Prebble, I felt while listening that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was going through the motions to satisfy importunate fans or to make some money, dusting off things from previous tales like the Hidden Room, the Vengeful Brotherhood, and the American History. And the discomfiture of dull Inspectors by Holmes’ Sphinx-like utterances until the Great Detective finally explains everything has worn thin.

    And the second half of the novel removes us from Holmes and Watson, occurring in an American mining valley being terrorized by a secret Order of thugs, and the lurid interest evoked by Doyle doesn’t ring true, perhaps because he doesn’t know America as well as he knows England, or perhaps because the effect of the whole hinges on a surprise from which Watson (narrating Part 2 based on a pile of notes he has received) would spare us.

    Doyle also uncomfortably forces this novel into the Holmes Chronology before the events of “The Final Problem” (which follows The Valley of Fear in this audiobook), for in “The Final Problem” Holmes asks Watson if he’s ever heard of “ex-professor” Moriarty, and Watson says never, but the professor is a familiar topic at the start of The Valley of Fear.

    I recommend this audiobook to fans of Holmes who must read all his stories, but other readers should begin with The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes or The Memoirs, and readers who’d like to experience Doyle engaged heart and soul in his work should try The White Company or The Lost World.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kathy Matthews 12-03-12 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
    22
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    41
    15
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    5
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "so so"
    Do you have any additional comments?

    the second half of the book was much better than the first half (the part with Sherlock Holmes. I had trouble distinguishing the voices in the first half and following the story line, but others may not.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Linda PITTSBURGH, PA, United States 08-03-12
    Linda PITTSBURGH, PA, United States 08-03-12 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
    113
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    531
    69
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    22
    8
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Different"

    This is a Sherlock Holmes novella at the beginning, which is terrific. Experienced mystery readers will recognize plot devices later copied by others. Then the rest is a prequel like Study in Scarlet. It's not as good, but I ended up enjoying it too.

    This included the story The Final Solution.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jefferson 01-04-12
    Jefferson 01-04-12 Member Since 2010

    I love reading and listening to books, especially fantasy, science fiction, children's, historical, and classics.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1485
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    265
    238
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1040
    15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An Uninspired Holmes & Garish American Gangsters"

    The Valley of Fear, the last Sherlock Holmes novel, begins promisingly, with Holmes and Watson trying to solve a murder mystery at a country manor and firing off some great lines, as when Holmes upbraids Watson with a dumbbell: ???One dumb-bell, Watson! Consider an athlete with one dumb-bell! Picture to yourself the unilateral development, the imminent danger of a spinal curvature. Shocking, Watson, shocking!???

    But finally the novel is disappointing. Despite the skills and gravelly gravitas of reader Simon Prebble, I felt while listening that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was going through the motions to satisfy importunate fans or to make some money, dusting off things from previous tales like the Hidden Room, the Vengeful Brotherhood, and the American History. And the discomfiture of dull Inspectors by Holmes??? Sphinx-like utterances until the Great Detective finally explains everything has worn thin.

    And the second half of the novel removes us from Holmes and Watson, occurring in an American mining valley being terrorized by a secret Order of thugs, and the lurid interest evoked by Doyle doesn???t ring true, perhaps because he doesn???t know America as well as he knows England, or perhaps because the effect of the whole hinges on a surprise from which Watson (narrating Part 2 based on a pile of notes he has received) would spare us.

    Doyle also uncomfortably forces this novel into the Holmes Chronology before the events of ???The Final Problem??? (which follows The Valley of Fear in this audiobook), for in ???The Final Problem??? Holmes asks Watson if he???s ever heard of ???ex-professor??? Moriarty, and Watson says never, but the professor is a familiar topic at the start of The Valley of Fear.

    I recommend this audiobook to fans of Holmes who must read all his stories, but other readers should begin with The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes or The Memoirs, and readers who???d like to experience Doyle engaged heart and soul in his work should try The White Company or The Lost World.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-4 of 4 results
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  • A User
    4/5/11
    Overall
    "Good story, poor accents"

    Fantastic story but it's slightly ruined by the the narrators 'Scottish' accent, which gets more and more annoying as the story goes on.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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