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Field Gray: A Bernie Gunther Novel | [Philip Kerr]

Field Gray: A Bernie Gunther Novel

Philip Kerr crafts a thrilling chapter from his critically acclaimed Bernie Gunther series. In Field Gray, Bernie finds himself imprisoned in 1954—and told he can either work for French intelligence or he can hang. Accepting his new job, Bernie begins interviewing POWs returning from Germany. And things get interesting when he meets a French war criminal and member of the French SS who has been posing as a German Wehrmacht officer.
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Audible Editor Reviews

In his international pursuit of Erich Mielke (the real-life head of the Stasi), Bernard Gunther enters the employment of Reinhard Heydrich (the infamous Reichsprotektor of Bohemia and Moravia, whose own assassination in Prague inspired a Hollywood movie directed by Fritz Land from a script by Brecht). Ostensibly a German mercenary, Gunther is in fact second cousin to the wise-cracking cynics of Raymond Chandler's world: even his name is shortened to ‘Bernie’ in recognition of his true literary nationality. His pursuit soon takes on secondary importance as the narrative morphs into a string of entertaining set-pieces framed by an increasingly fractured narrative that jumps from '41 to '54, Cold War to WWII, Berlin to Cuba to New York. This sense of dislocation ads to the ambiguity that surrounds Gunther: As he tells and retells his story to various interrogators from the CIA and the Stasi, the listener has to make up his or her own mind about the reliability of his point of view and the extent of his culpability.

It’s a brave choice by Philip Kerr to ask us to engage with a character that occupies moral ground as grey as the army uniform described in the title. He's not helped by the often uneasy mixture of the wise-cracking tone demanded by the conventions of hardboiled noir and the very real history that, at times, overwhelms the story. Cynical quips and the Holocaust don’t mix all that well. Field Gray is packed with background information, and the dialogue is at its weakest when characters speak a little too extensively about the historical background, as if Kerr is trying to cram in every last scrap of his research.

However, these flaws are redeemed in this recording by the perfect marriage between voice and character as presented by Paul Hecht. His voice (reminiscent of Philip Baker Hall) is rich in regret and his crumpled world-weariness matches Bernard Gunther's embattled defensiveness. Here is a character who constantly has to justify his compromised choices to interrogators that have been untouched by the hard choices made necessary by war, and Hecht’s delivery is just right for a defendant who has seen things that his prosecutors can hardly dream of. Even within the context of his unique voice, Hecht manages to color it with light and shade so that the supporting characters are more than just background voices. This is a voice you’ll want to listen to. — Dafydd Phillips

Publisher's Summary

Philip Kerr crafts a thrilling chapter from his critically acclaimed Bernie Gunther series. In Field Gray, Bernie finds himself imprisoned in 1954—and told he can either work for French intelligence or he can hang. Accepting his new job, Bernie begins interviewing POWs returning from Germany. And things get interesting when he meets a French war criminal and member of the French SS who has been posing as a German Wehrmacht officer.

Listen to more Bernie Gunther titles.

©2011 Philip Kerr (P)2011 Recorded Books, LLC

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (167 )
5 star
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4.3 (121 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Jean Santa Cruz, CA, United States 05-21-11
    Jean Santa Cruz, CA, United States 05-21-11 Member Since 2010

    I am an avid eclectic reader.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Field Gray"

    This book covers the period's of 1930's, 40's and 50's in Germany. Paul Hecht does a great job of narration. This book looks at WWII from the view of a German policeman. It is very interesting and the treatment of German POW by the Russian was accurately portrayed in the story. I found myself checking up on various events described in the book to see how historically accurate they were. I must say the ending of the book took me by surprise. I was going straight and the story took a big turn. Exciting. This was my first Phillip Kerr book.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Vikon USA 12-22-11
    Vikon USA 12-22-11 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "So far, the best in a masterful series"

    Don't start with Field Gray, save it for after you have listened to the preceding volumes in the "Bernie Gunther" detective series. Kerr's creation is an engaging, wryly comic, and morally challenging character. Paul Hecht's reading deeply and unobtrusively captures the spirit of Gunther, as well as the many adversaries Kerr pits against him in this expansive, complex, but eminently clear political detective story, steeped in a history no one should have the pleasure of forgetting about. Field Gray is as much a warning as it is a retelling about the depths of inhumanity in which humanity can so easily lose itself.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Fritz Moraga, CA, United States 06-04-11
    Fritz Moraga, CA, United States 06-04-11 Member Since 2008

    No matter where you go, there you are.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Simply, one of, if not the, best living writers"

    Another wonderfully written, dark, but revealing look into the evil of which man is capable. Gunter is a bit of a "superman" himself, but not outrageously so as his escapades reveal the darkness that is the Nazis, and war itself. This character's behavior would not have survived in the real Nazi regime, but Kerr makes a very plausible case for Bernie's doing so. He's done enough with Bernie, so while I am sure his children's books are great, I hope he can invent another character to reveal another of mankind's inner workings and soon.
    And whatever happen to cause him change narrators is a clear case of over thinking. John Lee was the perfect Gunter and the change had a negative effect on my listening pleasure!

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Frank J. Habic Osprey, Florida, US 01-25-12
    Frank J. Habic Osprey, Florida, US 01-25-12
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The wise cracks are getting old"
    Was Field Gray worth the listening time?

    For the first time with a Kerr book, I have to say the book is much too long. It would be much shorter if Kerr simply resisted the urge to include one inane wise crack after another. It was a good story about an interesting period. However, after 5 books, I've had all of Bernie's smart mouth I can take. I'd have shot him myself---just to shut him up.


    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Greg minnetonka, MN, United States 04-22-11
    Greg minnetonka, MN, United States 04-22-11 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    189
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    "Best of a great series"

    This one is a "must read." Flashes forward/backward are handled extremely well and are singularly appropriate in their timing. Narration is outstanding.

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sandy Great Falls, MT, United States 08-21-11
    Sandy Great Falls, MT, United States 08-21-11 Member Since 2010

    My name is Ted and my wife is Sandy. I am a school teacher in Montana. I teach math and History. I live on 40 acres south of Great Falls.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Easy listen"

    The book jumps around and the descrption of the places are narrow. I just could not get into the book.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    critical shopper CA 05-08-13
    critical shopper CA 05-08-13 Member Since 2006

    critical choices

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    "I love Bernie"

    This character has all the worldweary charm of the era. I love the writing and it was very well read. Makes a nice companion piece with Mission to Paris by Alan Furst.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Terry Camas Valley, OR, USA 09-13-12
    Terry Camas Valley, OR, USA 09-13-12 Member Since 2007
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    "Disgusting main character - terrible language"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    Too much to change. I could find nothing to admire in the main character or the others. After listening for a couple hours I gave up. The language is explicit and disgusting. I would be embarrassed to let this play out loud in the presence of other people.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Philip Kerr again?

    Never.


    What about Paul Hecht’s performance did you like?

    Was fine.


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John Fort Myers, FL, United States 11-27-11
    John Fort Myers, FL, United States 11-27-11

    Retired lawyer/executive but active curmudgeon keeping busy by volunteering with Hope Hospice in the fall and winter and National Park Service in Spring and Summer. Training a new RV co-pilot after my long-time co-pilot passed away suddenly.

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    "As unlikely as hero as one might imagine"

    I still find it hard to believe that I would get hooked on a former SS officer as protagonist . I readily admit that , long ago, I was hooked on Bernie Gunther stories. Each book gets better and better. This one is terrific! Paul Hecht does an outstanding job with this book. It's seems like a very tough part to play but Mr Hecht makes the story come alive.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Allan Futrell Louisville, KY USA 07-06-11
    Allan Futrell Louisville, KY USA 07-06-11 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A Bit Awry but Still Worth a Listen"

    Kerr is probably one of those writers that you either really like or really don't like. His books on Audible benefit from good narrators (Paul Hecht is as delightful as John Lee once you get used to him) as well as interesting historical plots. I have no idea how accurate his Nazi world is, but it makes for enjoyable listening. Gunther is hard not to like as a hero because he so often turns out to be incredibly vulnerable. In this book Gunther gets a little out of his element, or maybe it is Kerr and his experimental style that goes a bit awry. Nevertheless, Kerr still delivers and Bernie does not disappoint.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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