The First Frontier: The Forgotten History of Struggle, Savagery, and Endurance in Early America Audiobook | Scott Weidensaul | Audible.com
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The First Frontier: The Forgotten History of Struggle, Savagery, and Endurance in Early America | [Scott Weidensaul]

The First Frontier: The Forgotten History of Struggle, Savagery, and Endurance in Early America

Frontier: the word carries the inevitable scent of the West. But before Custer or Lewis and Clark, before the first Conestoga wagons rumbled across the Plains, it was the East that marked the frontier - the boundary between complex Native cultures and the first colonizing Europeans.Here is the older, wilder, darker history of a time when the land between the Atlantic and the Appalachians was contested ground - when radically different societies adopted and adapted the ways of the other, while struggling for control of what all considered to be their land.
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Publisher's Summary

Frontier: the word carries the inevitable scent of the West. But before Custer or Lewis and Clark, before the first Conestoga wagons rumbled across the Plains, it was the East that marked the frontier - the boundary between complex Native cultures and the first colonizing Europeans.Here is the older, wilder, darker history of a time when the land between the Atlantic and the Appalachians was contested ground - when radically different societies adopted and adapted the ways of the other, while struggling for control of what all considered to be their land.

The First Frontier traces two and a half centuries of history through poignant, mostly unheralded personal stories - like that of a Harvard-educated Indian caught up in seventeenth-century civil warfare, a mixed-blood interpreter trying to straddle his white and Native heritage, and a Puritan woman wielding a scalping knife whose bloody deeds still resonate uneasily today. It is the first book in years to paint a sweeping picture of the Eastern frontier, combining vivid storytelling with the latest research to bring to life modern America’s tumultuous, uncertain beginnings.

©2012 Scott Weidensaul (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

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    Eric Chico, CA, United States 07-24-13
    Eric Chico, CA, United States 07-24-13 Member Since 2005
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    "Too PC"

    I'm giving this book good marks because of the thorough content. The book was well researched and will give you a good glimpse of the chaos of the frontier settlements. However, I had to hold my nose half a dozen times when listening to the book. The author is a bedwetting liberal who finds it easy to blame "Whitey" first for most provocations along the frontier - often (not always) omitting information that the attacks were retaliations, ie. Paxton Boys, almost as if the frontier settlers just woke up one day and decided to raid an Indian village for no apparent reason.

    The author tip toed around any historical reference which had the potential of offending Indians.

    When describing attacks by the whites he uses the words ruthless, slaughter, massacre, etc. but when mentioning attacks by the Indian "Braves" and "Warriors" they just "killed" "Attacked" or captured the settlers - emphasizing that the "prisoners" were well treated and easily assimilated into the Indian Life.

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    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
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