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Five Days at Memorial Audiobook

Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

In the tradition of the best writing on medicine, physician and reporter Sheri Fink reconstructs five days at Memorial Medical Center and draws the listener into the lives of those who struggled mightily to survive and to maintain life amidst chaos. After Katrina struck and the floodwaters rose, the power failed, and the heat climbed, exhausted caregivers chose to designate certain patients last for rescue. Months later, several health professionals faced criminal allegations that they deliberately injected numerous patients with drugs to hasten their deaths. Five Days at Memorial, the culmination of six years of reporting, unspools the mystery of what happened in those days.
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Audible Editor Reviews

Editors Select, September 2013 - I’m more of a fiction reader and listener, but on the occasions when I turn to nonfiction it’s to better understand a compelling story. The best narrative nonfiction – like Unbroken and Devil in the White City – remains with you long after the last chapter has ended, and so is the case with my September pick, which reveals the chaotic details, devastating conditions, and overwhelming emotions that emerged during the five days that hundreds of patients, employees, family members, and pets spent stranded in New Orleans’ Memorial Hospital during Hurricane Katrina. It’s hard to listen to the events of those days – but almost as impossible to put the book down as author Sheri Fink, who previously won the Pulitzer Prize for her reporting, raises important questions about end-of-life care and how to be better prepared for major disasters. Frightening, fascinating, and highly recommended. —Diana D., Audible Editor

Publisher's Summary

Pulitzer Prize winner Sheri Fink’s landmark investigation of patient deaths at a New Orleans hospital ravaged by Hurricane Katrina - and her suspenseful portrayal of the quest for truth and justice

In the tradition of the best writing on medicine, physician and reporter Sheri Fink reconstructs five days at Memorial Medical Center and draws the listener into the lives of those who struggled mightily to survive and to maintain life amidst chaos.

After Katrina struck and the floodwaters rose, the power failed, and the heat climbed, exhausted caregivers chose to designate certain patients last for rescue. Months later, several health professionals faced criminal allegations that they deliberately injected numerous patients with drugs to hasten their deaths.

Five Days at Memorial, the culmination of six years of reporting, unspools the mystery of what happened in those days, bringing the listener into a hospital fighting for its life and into a conversation about the most terrifying form of health care rationing.

In a voice at once involving and fair, masterful and intimate, Fink exposes the hidden dilemmas of end-of-life care and reveals just how ill-prepared we are in America for the impact of large-scale disasters - and how we can do better. A remarkable book, engrossing from start to finish, Five Days at Memorial radically transforms your understanding of human nature in crisis.

©2013 Sheri Fink (P)2013 Random House Audio

What Members Say

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  •  
    Thug4life Sutton, MA 10-09-13
    Thug4life Sutton, MA 10-09-13 Member Since 2015

    I'm just a dumb troglodyte who like reading. Me feel good after I read book.

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    "So much detail!"
    Would you try another book from Sheri Fink and/or Kirsten Potter?

    As a curious person, I often tackle books outside my experience base. However, I was interested in what happened at Memorial Hospital in New Orleans immediately following Hurricane Katrina. 5 Days at Memorial (5-Days) is an excellent book for anyone associated with providing medical treatment. Sheri Fink completes a step-by-step analysis into each facet of the tragedy that occurred following Katrina. Fink is an exceptional writer and her ability deconstruct this tragic story is amazing. As a professional not involved in the medical world, I soon became burdened by the relentless detail described in 5-Days. There were so many patients, nurses, doctors, medicines, and government officials that I soon lost track of the story. 5-Days has a heavy and serious tone that is constantly present. Overall, this is an excellent book for lawyers, doctors, nurses, ethicists, and hospital professional. As a curious reader I lost focus about halfway in.


    7 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alan ROSLYN HEIGHTS, NY, United States 01-19-14
    Alan ROSLYN HEIGHTS, NY, United States 01-19-14 Member Since 2007
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    "A missed opportunity; a book to avoid"
    What disappointed you about Five Days at Memorial?

    This is a book that could have been so much more had the author had any talent beyond headline grabbing. This book's greatest failure is the author's inability to move the story past the immediacy of tabloid journalism. It reports without any critical analysis leaving the reader, who lacks expertise, with the authorial responsibility to fill in the missing gaps and determine which voices are correct or the most accurate. It's raison d'etre is not how medical institutions function in a crisis but with the accusation that euthanasia was committed. It is an important story. This book might have been important. What happened in New Orleans also happened in New York City after Sandy and may happen again in other cities.

    The book does not cover so many important issues that bubble up from the story being told. It leaves out of its purview the role of privately owned, for profit hospitals in preparing for and responding to these crises. It gives almost no coverage to what happened beyond this hospital on a local, state, Federal level that left medical personal incommunicado, literally in darkness, with no idea when rescue would happen, and in fear of attack either from residents from the surrounding area or from those in equally squalid conditions. She leaves unanswered why the individual most thought was coordinating relief was a private nurse with only a few hours of disaster courses, not a FEMA employee or even in contact with FEMA. Yet the myopia is only a part of the frustration one will experience with this book.

    The only reason this book was written is because allocations that euthanasia occurred at this hospital were made. The author skews the story in order to assign blame when the story she tells is that people in isolation, in desperate straights, without electricity, without, air conditioning, in fear for their safety, suffering from sleep deprivation and hope of rescue as low as could be imagined, were doing their best to deal with the overwhelming challenges they faced. It might be argued that some of these issues are dealt with in the second section of the book. This would be false. The author does write of how medical personal behaved in Haiti after the earthquake. She brings up, briefly, how NYC hospitals managed when Hurricane Sandy struck. But her analysis is always superficial and is essentially useless. In both cases, individuals did not fear isolated. They did not fear for their personal safety. They were in contact with the outside world. They did not feel hopeless and helpless. They remained in control and in communication with the outside world. They were not part of for profit health corporations who had no plan with how to deal with a disaster of this magnitude nor did they feel any urgency to provide support to these beleaguered medical personnel. There is not analysis of health care provided by for-profit hospitals versus publically supported hospitals.

    Then there is the larger issue of life and care of those elderly who are in a persistent vegetative state. The issue is touched upon. Indeed, it is held up as a banner to the reader and the author as a bludgeon to beat individuals she clearly feels behaved improperly. Yet it is a subject that ought to be explored in depth, particularly since it is the costs of these services that are helping to make health care so expensive--and the reasons for-profit health care exists. As important as this subject is from the perspective of policy or morality it is analyzed from the selfish perspective of individual relatives of patients in this hospital or from a moral absolutist position. Even the author seems to suggest that those she believes behaved improperly and who deserved to be held criminally accountable, did so under the best motives. Since her focus never leaves the surface we have no idea why those individuals reached the conclusion that their actions were necessary and the humane because the author's reporting occurred while they were under criminal pearl.

    There is no historical analysis, there is no institutional analysis, there is little that ever does more than scratch the surface of any subject. All voices are granted equal weight and are rarely ever put in larger context. There is no authorial shaping of the story. It is the retelling of a story from the myopic and disjointed perspective of each individual, that had it some shape might have offered a valuable look at how and why people performed how they did.The reader is left screaming at the page at false conclusions made, for cheap attacks or for the superficiality of the information offered and the analysis offered. This may be an important story but it will have to be told by others as this author is lost and whose ability is unequal to the task.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Sheri Fink again?

    Very doubtful.


    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    C. C. Starcke New Orleans, LA 12-05-13
    C. C. Starcke New Orleans, LA 12-05-13 Member Since 2012
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    "Dissapointing"
    What disappointed you about Five Days at Memorial?

    It is obvious that Fink did her research and it was easy to trust her facts. I have nothing negative to say on that front. However, her writing style was far from engaging for me. This story is so incredibly intriguing, It makes you think about everything from disaster preparedness to assisted suicide to what you would do for survival... yet I felt the complexities of it were lost in this telling.


    How could the performance have been better?

    The narrator's lack of knowledge regarding the local dialect was horribly distracting throughout this entire book. PLEASE do some research and do not butcher the pronunciation of street names, sir names, common phrases, etc.


    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    DJM Franklin, TN USA 09-23-13
    DJM Franklin, TN USA 09-23-13 Member Since 2008
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    "Haunting"

    It is easy to say that those of us who were not there could never understand and should not judge. But if we are ever to learn we must try to put ourselves in these terrible places and we must be willing to judge. Fink has done an outstanding job providing a balanced and detailed account of what transpired during those hellish five days that so many of us remember watching unfold on television. She speaks for the medical workers, the families and the patients. As a pastor and a lawyer the questions she leaves me with are not related to whether the physicians did the right thing, but how we can help others the next time this happens, and the time after that.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    karen 09-18-13
    karen 09-18-13
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    "Trying to return it...."

    Memorial Hospital apparently had a policy of allowing employees to bring not only their children to work but also their pets, who'd spend the day in hospital-provided kennels. The story opens with an account of two doctors struggling to inject a terrified cat in the heart with a lethal dose of chemicals, trying -- successfully, eventually, after having to chase it and catch it twice --to kill it, allegedly to prevent it's suffering in the impending chaos. They then set about preparing to also kill off the remaining patients who can't be moved.

    That's the point at which I stopped listening. Too much, just too much.

    This is a true story, apparently. We are told these things happened, they were done.

    But for me, I came to realize -- very quickly, in this book -- that there are some true events that I just don't need to hear about. This was just too agonizing for me. Knowing that it's true makes it that much worse.

    I'm trying to return the book, per Audible's return policy. I haven't been successful yet, but this is not a book I want to explore any further. What did I expect? Probably a tale of heroism, courage under impossible circumstances. I wasn't expecting a tale of mass murder of animals and sick people.

    14 of 27 people found this review helpful
  •  
    dmusket 02-08-16
    dmusket 02-08-16 Member Since 2015
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    "Good story..interesting."

    Very detailed story about what happened at that hospital during Hurricane Katrina. The person writing the book was very analytical.. writing every fact from every different angle that could possibly be gathered. The narrator used only one monotone voice thoughout the whole book so it was a hard listen to finish.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Mordechai 07-29-15
    Mordechai 07-29-15
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    "Excellent job"

    Highlighting some of the most important issues. I would love to see Sheri investigate the decisions that put the hospitals in danger to begin with, Politics and money. Politicians operate under the assumption that you are dammed if you do, damned if you don't and how would it look if we had out side help that comes to assist (happened in Katrina and then again during Sandy; how long did it take for the national guard to get to Bellevue Hospital. The other issue money, NorthShore LIJ was the only institution that evacuated not using money as a consideration. It should be mandatory that every facility has a reserve of money set aside specifically for disasters (they have all made millions over the years). health care facilities should be held accountable for any out come if they are not prepared and totally reliant on government help. Thank you Sheri.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J.C. 05-20-15
    J.C. 05-20-15
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    "Good Nonfiction"

    Unbelievable true story. Good job by author to stay unbiased. Should be read by people in charge of disaster planning.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Twang 05-07-15
    Twang 05-07-15

    Yet Reader

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    "Not great but important to hear"

    Narration distracting from numerous mispronunciations of both common words, place names and terminology . Author likely biased but the underlying lessons of this event are necessary reading for all health professionals.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stephanie Schuster 03-26-15 Member Since 2013
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    "a very long but well written account"

    its hard to imagine what it was like in NOLA in the days after Katrina but this book gives us a small glimpse at just that. the idea of trying to practice medicine amidst chaos with misinformation and what seems like few supplies is a nightmare. if you were critically ill, would you want to suffer through this or be allowed to meet your maker?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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