Brothers in Arms: The Epic Story of the 761st Tank Battalion, WWII's Forgotten Heroes Audiobook | Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Anthony Walton | Audible.com
We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
Brothers in Arms: The Epic Story of the 761st Tank Battalion, WWII's Forgotten Heroes | [Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Anthony Walton]

Brothers in Arms: The Epic Story of the 761st Tank Battalion, WWII's Forgotten Heroes

A world famous basketball player writing about the history of World War II may seem incongruous. But there is an order to these things; Abdul-Jabbar's high school mentor, Leonard Smith, was in the 761st Battalion, the first all-black tank battalion to see combat in World War II.
Regular Price:$27.93
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

A world famous basketball player writing about the history of World War II may seem incongruous. But there is an order to these things; Abdul-Jabbar's high school mentor, Leonard Smith, was in the 761st Battalion, the first all-black tank battalion to see combat in World War II.

Together, Abdul-Jabbar and Smith interviewed the unit's 70 survivors and gleaned from them the story of this amazing band of brothers. The 761st operated under conditions of institutional racism that were as severe and evil as anything it might face on the battlefield. Yet, fighting with Patton at the Battle of the Bulge, it helped to turn back the German offensive. It even helped to liberate the concentration camp at Mauthausen. Abdul-Jabbar speaks to the honor, bravery, and dignity that characterized these men.

©2004 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Anthony Walton; (P)2004 Books on Tape

What the Critics Say

"A wealth of visual and tactical detail about what it was like to work, and often live, on the inside of a tank.... While it will leave aficionados satisfied, this is military history that will prove compelling to anyone with an interest in black men's experience during the 20th century." (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (30 )
5 star
 (13)
4 star
 (14)
3 star
 (2)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (1)
Overall
4.7 (11 )
5 star
 (8)
4 star
 (3)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.6 (11 )
5 star
 (7)
4 star
 (4)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Michael Baltimore, MD, USA 10-28-04
    Michael Baltimore, MD, USA 10-28-04 Member Since 2002
    HELPFUL VOTES
    305
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    196
    27
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2
    0
    Overall
    "The Greatest of the Greatest Generation"

    In the genre of Stephen Ambrose and every bit as good. Yet in one critical way, it is much better. Brothers In Arms tells the story of the fighting men of the 761st tank battalion. The racism these men faced is presented in a straightforward and serious way as simply another aspect of their lives, albeit a gut-wrenchingly important one. There is no preaching or rhetoric in the story and it just simply kills me. In the historical context, it was like discovering a completely unrecognized enemy in the war, even though I have always known that racism was there.

    In the face of such degrading hardship from their own country it would be impossible for any man to accomplish what these men did if they did not have each other. Brothers In Arms really brings this home without even trying and has given me a deep and profound appreciation for the word Brother. All of this said, this book is not about racism in WWII, it is about the 761st tank battalion and the incredible fighting they did and the vital contribution they made to winning the war.

    It should be no surprise that Kareem Abdul Jabar produced this excellent book; he has successfully pursued excellence all his life. The story is clearly written. I find that often in Ambrose' books it is difficult to tell to whom or to what a particular character is referring to when they are speaking. Not so here. I found myself thinking about this book many weeks after listening to it. I have been filled with emotion and a sense of patriotism, which feels odd considering the treatment of these men. I cannot say enough in favor of this book, and more importantly, of the men of the 761st. MB

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Larry Westlake, LA, United States 12-29-04
    Larry Westlake, LA, United States 12-29-04
    HELPFUL VOTES
    110
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    30
    24
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Awsome !"

    I loved this book. I appreciate this book mostly for the fact that it allowed you to hear about how African Americans were treated. It is so sad that you had to hear about the mistreatment of our brave soldiers after they sacrificed so much. I enjoyed the wonderful first hand accounts of the events that these brave men experienced. Hats off to all the solders who had the courage to stand up against all odds.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Charles Fred Smith Plano, Texas 08-11-10
    Charles Fred Smith Plano, Texas 08-11-10 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    122
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    230
    35
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    12
    1
    Overall
    "Tank Version of Tuskegee Airmen"

    This is a surprisingly good story of the 761st Tank Bn. and their battle with prejudice and Germans. The book is a typical WWII unit history with the racial prejudices of 1944 showing through clearly. This is not a detailed history but is a good story which most "unit histories" are not.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mark 04-28-09
    Mark 04-28-09 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
    11
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    95
    13
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Great perspective"

    I am changing my rating from 4 to 5 stars after listening a second time threw. I was not so interested in how black soldiers were treated in the southern USA, but it was and IS reality.

    I like the first person accounts this book has to offer. It isn't often you get these perspectives, as the men and women of that generation are dying fast.

    I recommend this book for ALL history buffs, Black or White.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William DENVER, CO, USA 02-17-06
    William DENVER, CO, USA 02-17-06
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Unique perspective on WWII history"

    Brings the reader into the battle for Europe after D-day with striking realism. The perspective of a black enlisted man was unique.
    Keep it up, Kareem.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alex ROCKVILLE, MD, USA 02-18-08
    Alex ROCKVILLE, MD, USA 02-18-08 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
    123
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    33
    9
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    "Writing A, Narration C-"

    Even though I have read a number of books on World War II, I thought this really added a lot to the story of tank soldiers and black soldiers.

    As for the narration, it was distracting and painful to hear so many mispronounced words and not obscure city names, but common words and frequently used historical words: straff for straf, personal mines for personnel mines, Ver-DUNE for Ver-done (Verdun), ambu-LANCE for ambulance, Ar-DEAN for Ar-den (Ardennes), Ba-vah-ria instead Ba-VARE-ia.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    S. Snoke Saitama, Japan 12-12-12
    S. Snoke Saitama, Japan 12-12-12
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A gritty story of Real Heroes"
    Would you listen to Brothers in Arms again? Why?

    Most Definitely yes!! The first time just had too much going on. I would love to have a map or Google Earth to follow along with where the tankers went. One of the many reasons I loved this book was that it was filled with facts about where they went and what they were doing while other events were going on elsewhere.

    Another big point for me was that I felt that the story wasn't full of heavy-handed preaching about how bad life was for blacks. I expected that, but the story was academically and objectively written. The people in the story just accepted and moved past all the horrible things that the whites did to them. I wouldn't/ couldn't have been that strong, and I admire them all for shouldering the burden of the racism while continuing to fight and die for the country that wouldn't even admit that they had basic human rights. All around them, white soldiers got breaks, warm food, etc. but the 761st weren't allowed to have any breaks, and kept fighting above and beyond the call of duty. I salute them all and wish more could be done to honor them for their actions.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    That's hard to say, because each of them had their own unique character. Some were important because of their innocent beliefs that everything was an adventure, some because their characters were rooted in steadfast devotion to each other. I guess each member of the tank crew for Cool Stud would be the main cast, but the story moved around to different companies, their commanders and so on, and each had an important part to play, so I would have to list everyone in the 761st as being special.


    Have you listened to any of Richard Allen’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Sorry, this was my first time hearing him. He did well for reading the story but I felt it would have been better if each person had a slightly different voice pattern. most of the characters' voices sounded too similar, so I had to listen for the name of who was speaking to be sure of everything.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes and no. As I said above, there's so much going on that I needed a break myself. But while listening to it, I was engrossed. I felt tired the way the characters were tired, never getting a break from the war or from how they were pushed by the uncaring command leadership.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-7 of 7 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.