We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
 >   > 
A Most Dangerous Book Audiobook

A Most Dangerous Book: Tacitus's Germania from the Roman Empire to the Third Reich

Regular Price:$18.19
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

Winner of the 2012 Christian Gauss Book Award

The riveting story of the Germania and its incarnations and exploitations through the ages.

The pope wanted it, Montesquieu used it, and the Nazis pilfered an Italian noble's villa to get it: the Germania, by the Roman historian Tacitus, took on a life of its own as both an object and an ideology. When Tacitus wrote a not-very-flattering little book about the ancient Germans in 98 CE, at the height of the Roman Empire, he could not have foreseen that the Nazis would extol it as "a bible", nor that Heinrich Himmler, the engineer of the Holocaust, would vow to resurrect Germany on its grounds. But the Germania inspired - and polarized - people long before the rise of the Third Reich. In this elegant and captivating history, Christopher B. Krebs, a professor of classics at Harvard University, traces the wide-ranging influence of the Germania over a 500-year span, showing us how an ancient text rose to take its place among the most dangerous books in the world.

©2011 Christopher B. Krebs (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.7 (27 )
5 star
 (9)
4 star
 (6)
3 star
 (8)
2 star
 (4)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
3.6 (22 )
5 star
 (6)
4 star
 (7)
3 star
 (5)
2 star
 (3)
1 star
 (1)
Story
4.0 (22 )
5 star
 (8)
4 star
 (8)
3 star
 (4)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (1)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    G. House Sr. Sherborn, MA, United States 07-01-13
    G. House Sr. Sherborn, MA, United States 07-01-13 Member Since 2016

    I am an avid listener. I listen between 75-100 hours per month on my iPhone: 60% fiction to 40% non-fiction.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    2671
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    619
    282
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    510
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Dry recitation of history -- boring"

    I had great expectations about this book. This book provides the platform upon which a Nazi Germany constructed. I did find some of the Germanic history interesting -- for example there wasn't really a Germany until the late 1800's. I love history books and have read a great many. This author lacks the flair of a McCullough by an order of magnitude. Only the diehards of historians should brave the seven hour trek -- it is just soo boring and not work the misery.

    7 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    AJC NJ--United States 06-02-16
    AJC NJ--United States 06-02-16 Member Since 2015

    othernj

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "GERMANY FROM ANCIENT ROME TO 1945"

    A Most Dangerous Book is an interesting academic study on the development of racial thought in Germany. The story of how a pamphlet of observations of ancient Germany, written by the Roman Tacitus, over almost 2 millennia ago was reinterpreted through the ages helped shape Nazi racial policy. The audible version was great. Performance reading clear with great emphasis on the major players.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steele Lux 08-14-15
    Steele Lux 08-14-15 Member Since 2015
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Author cites many sources, but fails to back up his own claims."

    I enjoyed Ashby's reading, pronunciation and enunciation.

    Krebs does an amazing job of summarizing the history of Tacitus' text as well as the politics of Rome at the time. He quotes many, many sources that discuss Tacitus and the Germanic tribes and tongues- many that claim those Germanen are, or are not, related to the modern Germanic people, languages and nations.

    He does a well enough job of describing the language variations and evolutions of this subject, but fails to explain why he says "They are not", "He was wrong", or "This was an error." He accuses a historical figure of "unspoken chagrin" but never hints at who noticed the chagrin. In a nutshell, I cannot tell if he is putting words in other peoples' mouths.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Acteon 06-25-15
    Acteon 06-25-15

    Acteon

    HELPFUL VOTES
    161
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    343
    109
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    10
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A wonderful book"
    Would you consider the audio edition of A Most Dangerous Book to be better than the print version?

    For me, yes, as it is so much more tiring for me to read than to listen. But I stopped often to make notes so I can refer back to certain things, and that took time.


    What about Mark Ashby’s performance did you like?

    I particularly appreciated his correct pronunciation of foreign words (Italia and German in particular). So often names are mangled. This book is something of a challenge as it contains, besides quite a number of proper names, phrases in Latin and German. The reading is generally clear and moves along, which suffices to give it 4 stars; correct pronunciation of foreign words adds a star.


    Any additional comments?

    The book is a fascinating tour across time that traces the fortunes of one book, shedding light on divers epochs along the way. Highly recommended for those who have a real interest in history.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Voler APO AE Iraq 04-18-15
    Voler APO AE Iraq 04-18-15 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    11
    5
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent book!"

    Excellent in:
    1. Topic is well researched
    2. Stylistically impeccable
    3. Witty quips pop up unexpectedly but appropriately
    4. Narrated beautifully with nary a mispronunciation
    5. If you're interested in European history of the 20th century, read this book

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tom Arvada, CO, United States 02-09-15
    Tom Arvada, CO, United States 02-09-15 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    19
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    17
    15
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interpretation mightier than the quill"

    Fascinating weave through history. The professor delivers depth and details that keep the telling intriguing, it helps to be up on your Roman, European, Judeo-Christian history and some situational subtleties of the Catholic Church and Luther .... or at least I used my tourist level knowledge to fill in a bit and give a picture filled backdrop to the telling.

    The takeaway: The power of the pen is shadowed when compared to the liberal interpretation to support ideological narrative.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • Amazon Customer
    11/20/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Good but flawed"
    What did you like most about A Most Dangerous Book?

    The revelation of the afterlife of a seemingly harmless classical source.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Tacitus, obviously. Least favourite the Nazis: I hate those guys.


    What does Mark Ashby bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

    Some odd pronunciation!


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Not really.


    Any additional comments?

    Again there were production issues in not briefing the narrator adequately on pronunciation. Whilst his German was faultless, his Latin was at times execrable. This is not his fault, but down to the producer/director. Limes is pronounced 'Lee Mays' not 'Lie Meez' as we kept getting (making this listener think of Limeys, the American nickname for British troops during WW1!). A quick check with the author should have verified that.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.