We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
 >   > 
1177 B.C. Audiobook

1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed

Regular Price:$19.95
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh’s army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen?

In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages", Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries.

A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age - and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

©2014 Eric H. Cline. Published by Princeton University Press. (P)2014 Audible, Inc.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.6 (980 )
5 star
 (231)
4 star
 (334)
3 star
 (290)
2 star
 (89)
1 star
 (36)
Overall
3.6 (887 )
5 star
 (228)
4 star
 (267)
3 star
 (263)
2 star
 (94)
1 star
 (35)
Story
3.7 (896 )
5 star
 (257)
4 star
 (301)
3 star
 (222)
2 star
 (73)
1 star
 (43)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Colleen Russell Andover, NJ United States 09-30-14
    Colleen Russell Andover, NJ United States 09-30-14 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    14
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not a Storyteller"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    Someone with purely academic interests who wants all the supporting information listed.


    What could Eric H. Cline have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

    Put the supporting information in end notes. Don't put the end notes in the audiobook.


    How could the performance have been better?

    Inflections often did not match the meaning of the sentence.


    Any additional comments?

    The book does not create a sense of a single defining moment, quite the opposite. Which is fine, but that's not what it seems like from the title and description. The book is dry with lots of lists, and is repetitive because it's not organized well.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ALeyrer 05-20-15
    ALeyrer 05-20-15 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent history, cringeworthy performance"
    What did you like best about 1177 B.C.? What did you like least?

    I'll have to purchase the text to finish. The performance is overemphasized and over-acted in the manner one reads to a small child.


    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Aaron Smith Santa Rosa, CA United States 08-14-14
    Aaron Smith Santa Rosa, CA United States 08-14-14 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    25
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    115
    16
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Disappointed"
    Would you try another book from Eric H. Cline and/or Andy Caploe?

    I was disappointed by the lack of supporting information. Where is the evidence to support assertions regarding climate? Where is the data on dusts and pollens in lakebed muds and regional glaciers? Where is the supporting evidence in preserved woods from the regions?

    Were there any economists involved or consulted in the research for this book, because economics were discussed. Extra-regional migrations or population shifts were hinted at, yet that was not discussed at length. If that is significant, it needs further research.

    The author focuses on individual leaders/kings/envoys who are supposed to drive whole cultures and economies, and does not satisfactorily delve into the contributions of lesser individuals/groups/cultures/religions of an area which have a more significant impact on the flow of goods and services.


    8 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mary Denver, United States Minor Outlying Islands 07-15-14
    Mary Denver, United States Minor Outlying Islands 07-15-14 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    8
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "How to ruin ancient history"

    It's hard to tick off a history buff, but this one brought back recurring nightmares from that Ancient History course. Egyptians, Minoans and Hittites were the easy ones…

    This should never have been an audio book--especially with the terrible narrator and his golly-gee intonations. I plowed on courageously through half the book, then just chucked it.

    A waste of time and money for me.

    8 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sir Vases Miami, FL 05-19-14
    Sir Vases Miami, FL 05-19-14 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    14
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    5
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "No Great Insights"
    What would have made 1177 B.C. better?

    This book has no insights into the history and talks little of the collapse of civilization.


    What was most disappointing about Eric H. Cline’s story?

    It has little to do with the title. It sounds like a continual recitation of silly ancient names, like reading all the begats in the Bible. It recounts some facts but does little to give a historical perspective.


    What does Andy Caploe bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Andy Caploe is a very professional narrator with a well modulated speaking voice, but he is not a good choice for this book. He would be better suited selling reverse mortgages to seniors or counting down the pop top 40. His tone is overacted interestedness, which does not come across as genuine and sounds like he is reading the book to 3rd graders.


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    This book makes you realize that a good historian does more than tell what happened. This could have been a good book in the hands of a better historian.


    Any additional comments?

    I would like a refund, please.

    13 of 22 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Leonard Honolulu, HI 04-10-14
    Leonard Honolulu, HI 04-10-14 Member Since 2016

    Say something about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    109
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    42
    41
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    4
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Too Much Detail for an Audiobook"

    When I first saw the printed volume, I was happy to see that it was also available as an audiobook. The historical subject is one I have not heard of before and so I quickly downloaded it and started listening. I was disappointed fairly quickly.

    If you are not intimately familar with the subject, the names for the ancient kingdoms and entities are completely new to you. The author does go to some troubles to help you over this hurdle. However, without a scorecard immediately at hand, it is hard to remember the names of the players.

    The narrator is fairly good but sometimes I felt it was a lecture for high school students.

    I will not download any of the follow on books in the series - this one was a bit too painful

    19 of 33 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael 09-29-16
    Michael 09-29-16
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "More characters than a Russian Novel."

    Painfully filled with trivia and characters that might appeal to a PHD in archaeology but terribly uninteresting to an average reader. The whole premise of the book could have been adequately explained in ten pages.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joy 09-29-16
    Joy 09-29-16
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Disappointing"

    I found the fact that this is supposed to be an unbiased, historical account of the histories leading up to the climactic downfall of civilizations in 1177 BC. I find that the author completely discounts, discredits and dismisses the Bible as a architectural treasure trove of confirmed histories. If he doesn't believe in scripture that's his personal view, but to come across and say-repeatedly- that the entirety of the Bible is in error historically or that at best its simply tales is an affront to any true historians intelligence.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Calvin Guthrie seattle, wa United States 09-26-16
    Calvin Guthrie seattle, wa United States 09-26-16 Member Since 2015

    Bluesproject

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    10
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Parallels the current collapse of civilizations"

    This is a deftly written and performed, expertly researched and presented, historical account that goes a long way in explaining the multi-faceted causes of the current collapse of the Syrian, Libyan, Iraqi populations in the current near east.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    JCool Houston 09-23-16
    JCool Houston 09-23-16

    JCool

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Dull, Unfocused"
    Any additional comments?

    After finishing the book, I had to reread the book description to be sure it said what I remembered. Indeed, it describes this book as a "gripping" story of the collapse as the author explains what caused the downfall of the late bronze age civilizations.


    That is a complete misrepresentation of this book, so perhaps my disappointment should fall on the publisher.


    The author spends the majority of the book piling on facts about individual cities and empires and their trading networks, from the 15th century onward, presumably to support his thesis of interconnectedness. As an introduction to these societies it was only rudimentary at best, but then he spent far more words than were required to establish that the societies had regular trading and diplomatic relations.


    After completing the slog through this section, I was relieved to finally get to the 12th century, so I could find out what happened in the collapse and why it happened. Well, I still don't know either of those things, and I suspect the author doesn't either.


    His account of the collapse, if you could call it that, consists of him recounting the results of archaeological research at different cities, recounting what one researcher believes happened, then immediately contradicting that with what another researcher believes, then saying, something to the effect of "we really don't know for sure". Rinse and repeat across the Mediterranean, in no clear order. He never really even talks about what happened in Egypt in 1177 BC, other than to mention there were some battles. Odd, considering that's the title of his book.


    So now we get to the explanation, where the author is going to explain what caused the collapse. That's the promise of this book, right? Nope, the author throws up one probable explanation after another, and then immediately explains why that couldn't possibly be it. At the end of the book, it felt like he just threw his hands in the air and said "Well, it's probably everything".


    He doesn't even flesh out his own thesis, that the interconnectedness made them fall in a domino effect. He repeats it over and over again, but doesn't make a clear, convincing case of how cutting ties would result in the failure of a state. (The closest thing I could gather as evidence was the Hittites relying in imported grain due to a famine during this time period.) Was breakdown of relations and trade with a failing society the cause of the next societal failure down the chain, or just a correlation?


    Clearly, we don't know what happened here, or how. That's fine, I get that it's very challenging to piece it together from 3000 year old fragments. However, the description led me to believe I'd get a gripping tale of a glorious era of civilization, its demise, and what brought it down. Instead I got a disjointed recitation of research findings, lots of academic namedropping, and tons of conjecture. Probably good for an archeology class or academic setting, which is how it should have been advertised.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.