The Blood of Flowers Audiobook | Anita Amirrezvani | Audible.com
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The Blood of Flowers | [Anita Amirrezvani]

The Blood of Flowers

In 17th-century Persia, a 14-year-old woman believes she will be married within the year. When her beloved father dies, she and her mother find themselves alone and without a dowry. With nowhere else to go, they are forced to sell the brilliant turquoise rug the young woman has woven to pay for their journey to Isfahan, where they will work as servants for her uncle, a rich rug designer in the court of the legendary Shah Abbas the Great.
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Audible Editor Reviews

Why we think it's Essential: I knew Iranian actress Shohreh Aghdashloo from her Oscar-nominated performance in The House of Sand and Fog, and hoped for another star turn in her narration of Anita Amirrezvanivs debut novel - I wasn't disappointed. Aghdashloo's deep, raspy voice is absolutely haunting, whether describing the (surprisingly) fascinating intricacies of rug-making or re-telling the Iranian folktales that are woven into the story. A colorful, lush tale that I didn't want to end. —Diana Dapito

Publisher's Summary

In 17th-century Persia, a 14-year-old woman believes she will be married within the year. When her beloved father dies, she and her mother find themselves alone and without a dowry. With nowhere else to go, they are forced to sell the brilliant turquoise rug the young woman has woven to pay for their journey to Isfahan, where they will work as servants for her uncle, a rich rug designer in the court of the legendary Shah Abbas the Great.

Despite her lowly station, the young woman blossoms as a brilliant designer of carpets, a rarity in a craft dominated by men. But while her talent flourishes, her prospects for a happy marriage grow dim. Forced into a secret marriage to a wealthy man, the young woman finds herself faced with a daunting decision: forsake her own dignity, or risk everything she has in an effort to create a new life.

©2007 Anita Amirrezvani; (P)2007 Hachette Audio

What the Critics Say

"Sumptuous imagery and a modern sensibility...make this a winning debut." (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.2 (1137 )
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  •  
    Rachelle Dundurn, SK, Canada 07-15-10
    Rachelle Dundurn, SK, Canada 07-15-10 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "An enjoyable listen"

    The story itself is both lovely and ugly, and the narrator's voice is just the same.

    I'm not exactly sure how to summarize or quantify this book; it's a glimpse into the life of a girl born in 17th century Iran, with all of the small joys and large pains that such a life entails.

    It's a story of poverty, betrayal, and redemption, but it's not told in a traditional fairy-tale way, where the redemption equates to marrying a prince and living happily ever after. Bottom line; it's well worth a credit, especially if you have any interest at all Arab culture.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jane Montana, MT, USA 01-15-08
    Jane Montana, MT, USA 01-15-08
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    "Very moving"

    Amazing book. Thoroughly enjoyed, beautifully read.

    1 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Taylor Mableton, GA, USA 08-01-09
    Taylor Mableton, GA, USA 08-01-09
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    "I could never be a 2nd wife"

    This could almost be titled Carpets, Carpets, Sucks to be a Poor Muslim Woman, and More Carpets. Not the most enthralling story, but an interesting look into another world. Disappointing support from her family. A portion of time focuses on her affair with her lover/husband. Tastefully presented, but could be explicit to some readers. The narrator definitely has a raspy voice which takes some getting used to.

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Diann Brooklyn, NY, United States 11-30-07
    Diann Brooklyn, NY, United States 11-30-07 Member Since 2006
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    "Mesmerising, Moving, & Heart Felt"

    This book propels you immediately into 700AD Iraqi. The sights, the smell, the people and the especially the colors of the carpets. This is a girl coming of age story, the girl is wise beyond her years; if not many centuries wiser. Through all the trials,tributions and humilations she endears, I saw my own story reflected, hungry, pain, hopelessness, but like the Pheonix, she (and I) rose above it all. This would be a great book club selection,

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Shirley Oakland, TN, United States 09-26-09
    Shirley Oakland, TN, United States 09-26-09 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "difficult to understand narrator"

    and I guess I am just tired of the mid east culture of women being nothing more than property, and virginity is the highest held esteem thing a woman can have. The book takes such a simple, first grade approach, and is slow.

    0 of 3 people found this review helpful
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