We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
Midnight's Children | [Salman Rushdie]

Midnight's Children

Salman Rushdie holds the literary world in awe with a jaw-dropping catalog of critically acclaimed novels that have made him one of the world's most celebrated authors. Winner of the prestigious Booker of Bookers, Midnight's Children tells the story of Saleem Sinai, born on the stroke of India's independence.
Regular Price:$41.99
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Salman Rushdie holds the literary world in awe with a jaw-dropping catalog of critically acclaimed novels that have made him one of the world's most celebrated authors. Winner of the prestigious Booker of Bookers, Midnight's Children tells the story of Saleem Sinai, born on the stroke of India's independence.

©1981 Salman Rushdie; (P)2009 Recorded Books, LLC

What the Critics Say

“Extraordinary . . . one of the most important [novels] to come out of the English-speaking world in this generation.” (The New York Review of Books)

“Burgeons with life, with exuberance and fantasy . . . Rushdie is a writer of courage, impressive strength, and sheer stylistic brilliance.” (The Washington Post Book World)

“A marvelous epic . . . Rushdie’s prose snaps into playback and flash-forward . . . stopping on images, vistas, and characters of unforgettable presence. Their range is as rich as India herself.” (Newsweek)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.8 (587 )
5 star
 (207)
4 star
 (163)
3 star
 (131)
2 star
 (50)
1 star
 (36)
Overall
4.0 (369 )
5 star
 (153)
4 star
 (107)
3 star
 (66)
2 star
 (27)
1 star
 (16)
Story
4.2 (379 )
5 star
 (196)
4 star
 (109)
3 star
 (44)
2 star
 (17)
1 star
 (13)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    John San Francisco, CA, USA 05-20-10
    John San Francisco, CA, USA 05-20-10 Member Since 2004
    HELPFUL VOTES
    36
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    26
    10
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Form not content"

    Midnight's Children is beautifully written and, while I agree that the narrator may overdo it sometimes, the reading works very well for me, transports me to another world.

    But nearly halfway into it, I'm thinking: OK, but so what? So far there have been a string of character studies -- beautiful character studies, to be sure -- all intertwined and related with one another, but ... where's the narrative? Is something happening? Is there a story here somewhere?

    So far, it's mostly form with very little content. So this would be an amusing book for those who are content with character vignettes, and less so for those of us who appreciate a bit of plot.

    7 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Deedra United States 05-12-13
    Deedra United States 05-12-13 Member Since 2013

    ddbug4

    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    58
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Midnights Children"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    This is a good book...if you can get by all the twists and turns to understand what is going on.I love Rushdies books but this one left me wonder 'WHAT was that about' long after reading it.


    What about Lyndam Gregory’s performance did you like?

    The narrorator was great!


    Any additional comments?

    Out of all his books I wonder how THIS one got picked to be a movie.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Randall Lincoln, NE, United States 05-11-12
    Randall Lincoln, NE, United States 05-11-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    9
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    21
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I did not enjoy this book"

    Abstract and narrated in a dialect I couldn't understand that reminded me of all of the bad computer help desk voices. This book just did NOT work for me. I didn't like it on any level. A total waste of time.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pat New York, NY, USA 07-08-10
    Pat New York, NY, USA 07-08-10
    HELPFUL VOTES
    5
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    5
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Ponderous reader"

    The birth of India sounds significant the way the narrator reads it. That's appropriate, but he uses the same tone for the (copious) description of the child's (copious) snot, for instance. I made it through the first third of the book before giving it up with India still in it's youth.

    5 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    CHESTER LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 10-19-14
    CHESTER LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 10-19-14 Member Since 2007

    Chet Yarbrough, an audio book addict, exercises two cocker spaniels twice a day with an Ipod in his pocket and earbuds in his ears. Hope these few reviews seduce the public into a similar obsession but walk safely and be aware of the unaware.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    50
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    604
    160
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "GOD AND THE SNAKE"

    "Midnight’s Children" is about God and the snake. Written by Salman Rushdie, it is a story about religion and knowledge. It raises issues about God, Allah, Shiva, Buddha and many fundamental religious beliefs. In "Midnight’s Children", Rushdie uses a satiric pen to tell the story of India’s independence and the role of religion in Indian/Pakistani society.

    "Midnight’s Children" is a “coming of age” saga about one child born at the strike-of-midnight August 15, 1947, the day India became an independent nation-state. Rushdie demythologizes religion and promotes humanism by telling a story of India and Pakistan’s history. He infers the prime mover of life is human nature; not God.

    Rushdie uses the snake as a symbol of knowledge; knowledge that contains both good and evil. Rushdie writes that snake venom kills and heals; i.e. it kills when there is too much; heals when used in correct proportion. Saleem, as a young boy, survives early death with administration of the right proportion of venom; i.e. the right amount of knowledge.

    Prominence of a nose is a recurrent theme in Rusdie’s story. At times, Rushdie’s writing is laugh-out-loud funny, like when he describes the prominence of a big nose. Though the clairvoyant quality of Saleem’s life is lost when his nose is operated on, the nose offers other extraordinary powers. A listener is inclined to believe, as Saleem matures, that a nose knows about life and living in the Middle East and other regions of a troubled world.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kathy Nichols Healdsburg, CA United States 10-09-14
    Kathy Nichols Healdsburg, CA United States 10-09-14 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    9
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An epic read"

    This is not an easy read, but I was glad to do it and sometime want to listen again. The use of language is wonderful and I loved the accent of the reader. Some of the descriptions go on and on, and sometimes it is hard to follow - but overall it is lush, funny and very creative. I found that the wikipedia synopsis was helpful to understand the historical significance.

    My husband read it and I listened to it, and we both thought it was a great book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sandeep NEW YORK, NY, United States 09-02-11
    Sandeep NEW YORK, NY, United States 09-02-11 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    5
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    11
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Really slow book!!!"
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    No, the book is an extremely slow read. Gets very boring at times


    Would you be willing to try another book from Salman Rushdie? Why or why not?

    I will definitely try one of his other books.

    I have read a lot of great reviews for some of his books, and would want to try out more of his books!


    Which character – as performed by Lyndam Gregory – was your favorite?

    The main character was my favorite


    Was Midnight's Children worth the listening time?

    No


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Corinne Washington, DC, United States 08-14-09
    Corinne Washington, DC, United States 08-14-09 Member Since 2004
    HELPFUL VOTES
    352
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1096
    96
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    24
    0
    Overall
    "Very boring and poorly read"

    I liked Rushdie's Shalimar the Clown - I did NOT like this book and it will probably be the last Rushdie I will read/listen to. The story tries too hard, the reader tries too hard. It's as if all the energy is directed towards telling the reader "this is funny," and it isn't. It's forced.

    7 of 17 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 41-48 of 48 results PREVIOUS145NEXT

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.