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Midnight's Children Audiobook

Midnight's Children

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Publisher's Summary

Salman Rushdie holds the literary world in awe with a jaw-dropping catalog of critically acclaimed novels that have made him one of the world's most celebrated authors. Winner of the prestigious Booker of Bookers, Midnight's Children tells the story of Saleem Sinai, born on the stroke of India's independence.

©1981 Salman Rushdie; (P)2009 Recorded Books, LLC

What the Critics Say

“Extraordinary . . . one of the most important [novels] to come out of the English-speaking world in this generation.” (The New York Review of Books)

“Burgeons with life, with exuberance and fantasy . . . Rushdie is a writer of courage, impressive strength, and sheer stylistic brilliance.” (The Washington Post Book World)

“A marvelous epic . . . Rushdie’s prose snaps into playback and flash-forward . . . stopping on images, vistas, and characters of unforgettable presence. Their range is as rich as India herself.” (Newsweek)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.8 (927 )
5 star
 (350)
4 star
 (261)
3 star
 (185)
2 star
 (69)
1 star
 (62)
Overall
3.9 (668 )
5 star
 (268)
4 star
 (201)
3 star
 (111)
2 star
 (46)
1 star
 (42)
Story
4.2 (680 )
5 star
 (364)
4 star
 (184)
3 star
 (70)
2 star
 (35)
1 star
 (27)
Performance
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  •  
    january Rock Hill, SC 07-01-13
    january Rock Hill, SC 07-01-13 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "a magical story about what's his name"

    I did not give the story three stars because I didn't enjoy it. I gave it three stars because I would need to be a genius, and probably an Indian Historian, to be able to understand it all.

    I did like the book though, and for many reasons. The most important being that Salman Rushdie can turn words inside out and upside down and form them into something beautiful that you've never seen before. This book made me feel like what I imagine it would feel like to be in India. The smells, the traffic , the poor people hanging onto buses and trains. He doesn't make things picturesque. He makes things real. Not only the good, but the bad as well. The narrator of the story, Saleem Sinai, doesn't hold back from telling us how things really are. He tells us about his snot, accidentally seeing his mother's woohoo, fighting on the wrong side of things and falling in love with his sister. He is the kind of narrator that most of us are. He forgets things, backtracks, skips ahead, gets muddled. But through it all you learn about his whole family and history, and how the history of India is a part of everything. My favorite character is the grandmother, Reverend Mother. She is absurd, and yet, somehow quite likable. Every time she said "what's his name" it made me smile.

    I found Midnight's Children easier to understand than The Satanic Verses. Even though it doesn't flow in chronological order, and the story is often interrupted by Padma, it is not as fantastical or as dreamlike as SV. But there are some similar themes in both books. Rushdie seems to be fond of the good/evil, God/Satan dynamic. Also, reality and non-reality play an equal part.

    If you like books that push you, that expand you, that make you question things and look at the world in new ways, then you will like this book. It's not easy, but it is worth it.

    18 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jessica minneapolis, MN, United States 05-10-09
    Jessica minneapolis, MN, United States 05-10-09

    i'm listening

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    "great book, poor narration"

    The reader overplayed it. I think he was trying to add to the humor in the story and in so doing, killed the funny. Subtlety is a key in these performances. I wish they would have had Simon Vance do it, or Simon Prebble or .... well anyway.
    The story itself is funny and touching and provocatve. Historical fiction at its best, telling the story of the times with a wide vision, and at the same time not loosing the thred of a human, personal story. And of course, there's a bit of magic, a bit of destiny... good stuff. I would download it again if they released another performance. Maybe they will get Grimus out soon? I hope.

    22 of 26 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Abby Wines Death Valley, CA 07-15-11
    Abby Wines Death Valley, CA 07-15-11 Member Since 2011
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    "magic realism, but a slow listen"

    The story reminded me of the "magic realism" of One Hundred Years of Solitude. If you enjoy that type of writing, you will enjoy this. The book takes place in India. The main character's life parallel's India's growth as an independent nation, including struggles with Pakistan. There were parts of the book that were fast-paced and extremely engaging, but I found there were also parts that my attention lagged during. I felt that was due to the book itself, not to the narrator.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pritika Madison, WI, USA 10-31-09
    Pritika Madison, WI, USA 10-31-09
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    "Beautiful rendition, but..."

    Listening to books is an unforgettable experience, especially the books one loves. "Midnight's Children" is one of my favorites, and continues to be in audio form as well. Lyndam Gregory does a beautiful rendition of Midnight's Children. He gives each character a unique voice that makes them come alive. As the listener, you can see the characters in your mind. Gregory has the ability to evoke the essence of each character. Most importantly, he delivers the high drama of Rushdie's book. But... the only thing that was a bit of a put-off was the pronunciations of the names of the characters. Gregory does an excellent job with various kinds of Indian accents - it is obvious that he has really worked at it. However, he is not quite able to pronounce names, i.e., the proper nouns. Every time he says "Parvati" it sounds like "poverty", and "Nizam" always comes out as "Nazim", and so on. I would still highly recommend this audio book - it is a wonderful companion on a long drive.

    14 of 17 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marsha Tierra Verde, FL, United States 12-20-14
    Marsha Tierra Verde, FL, United States 12-20-14 Member Since 2010
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    "I should have looked at the length"

    Since I'm certain that Rushdie is an amazing author, I will suppose that my taste is what is at fault here. It was tedious, random, had many difficult to remember names of characters and places, and was not unlike listening to a friend's demented grandfather ramble on (and on and on) about places and events you've never heard of.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    satya 07-06-14
    satya 07-06-14 Member Since 2016
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    "Great book, not a fan of fake indian accent"
    What did you love best about Midnight's Children?

    This book is very good and as reviewed by many, it stands as Salman Rushdie's best.


    What did you like best about this story?

    This is an awesome and fantastical account of India's birthing and growing pains. Some of the really important historical moments are told in a way I have never heard them before. The pain and suffering of all those years is hidden in plain sight by way of Rushdie's whimsical writing.


    What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

    The performance was good in parts, but, I can't stand that fake Indian accent. I am an Indian and I implore all the Narrators to stop doing that. I get it, we don't speak like you do but please stop over emphasizing those "t"s "d"s and "r"s. It is really jarring!!!


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Barry Petaluma, CA, United States 11-05-13
    Barry Petaluma, CA, United States 11-05-13 Member Since 2008

    My interests run to psychology, popular science, history, world literature, and occasionally something fun like Jasper Fforde. It seems like the only free time I have for reading these days is when I'm in the car so I am extremely grateful for audio books. I started off reading just the contemporary stuff that I was determined not to clutter up my already stuffed bookcases with. And now audio is probably 90% of my "reading" matter.

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    "Is this The Great Indian Novel?"

    Salman Rushdie sure isn't afraid to take on large themes in his books. The Satanic Verses dealt with the whole Anglo-Indian immigrant experience. Midnight's Children is a broadly sprawling picaresque account of the first 30 years of India's post-Empire independence. There is plenty of humor except when Rushdie pauses to be serious or poignant or sometimes even tragic. There is also a good deal of history thrown in for context, of which I daresay the average American is largely ignorant. It must have seemed, in 1977, as though India's brief flirtation with democracy was dangerously close to collapse.

    The problem with writing a book that way is that it's hard to feel especially close to any of his characters. There is a kind of distance between them and the reader held apart by the witty repartee of the author. I suppose that's why it feels especially touching when that distance is relaxed and characters are allowed to be vulnerable emotionally. Which isn't to say that his characters are not interesting or vivid in their own way. The upside of writing the book that way is that it keeps it entertaining even through the parts that, upon reflection, had to have been emotionally traumatic.

    I waited in vain for the sentence that cost Rushdie a defamation suit from Indira Gandhi, but that sentence has been removed. Rushdie's introduction to this anniversary edition talks about the suit, and the fascinating story of how the book came to be written and the very entertaining rejection notices this Booker Prize-winning book received. It is a shame Rushdie's career has been overshadowed by the controversy over Satanic Verses. I do not think he gets enough credit for being the wonderfully funny, witty, and entertaining author that he is.

    Lyndam Gregory does a fantastic job of catching the various Indian accents and keeping all the characters differentiated.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    raymond 05-01-13
    raymond 05-01-13
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    "Great Book; Outstanding Narration"
    What did you love best about Midnight's Children?

    This is a fabulous, ambitious book, magnificently written. The narration is also well-done, if sometimes a little bit too flamboyant; because the story is so thick and complex, a more measured narration may have been better, but the narrator has done a fabulous job of highlighting Rushdie's fantastic prose, and bringing the characters to life by his performance. This is the magic of a good audiobook: the marriage of a fine performance and first-rate prose. The only drawback to this recording is that the recorded chapter breaks do not mirror the actual book chapters. So, it makes it difficult to switch back and forth from the written text and the audiobook, which some readers like to do.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Andre Ithaca, NY, United States 04-02-13
    Andre Ithaca, NY, United States 04-02-13 Member Since 2006
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    "Slightly flawed masterpiece"

    The writing style is superb. The delivery is superb. The only problem is in the "plot"; a weird mixture of history and fantasy. Also, it goes on for too long in a number of places. But it is a real pleasure to listen to, and I could not imagine a better verbal rendition of it.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cecil West Memphis, AR, United States 03-23-13
    Cecil West Memphis, AR, United States 03-23-13 Member Since 2009

    I am a fan of both fiction and non-fiction with a recent bias toward fiction, possibly due to my history background. ]

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    "Maybe I ought to read it my self"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    The narrator put a spin on this book that I think may have taken away from it's impact. I listened to sections and then reflected on them and decided that if I had just read them my self I would have put a different emphasis on things and it would have had a far greater impact. So I stopped listening at a little over half way through.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The characters


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    I noticed that passages that should have been funny, weren't. Wrong pace, wrong emphasis?


    Do you think Midnight's Children needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    I can't say as I haven't finished it.


    Any additional comments?

    The characters are very well written, something the narrator couldn't take away from. I have high hopes for this book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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