Bring Up the Bodies: A Novel Audiobook | Hilary Mantel | Audible.com
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Bring Up the Bodies: A Novel | [Hilary Mantel]

Bring Up the Bodies: A Novel

Though he battled for seven years to marry her, Henry is disenchanted with Anne Boleyn. She has failed to give him a son and her sharp intelligence and audacious will alienate his old friends and the noble families of England. When the discarded Katherine dies in exile from the court, Anne stands starkly exposed, the focus of gossip and malice. At a word from Henry, Thomas Cromwell is ready to bring her down.
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Publisher's Summary

Man Booker Prize, Fiction, 2012

The sequel to Hilary Mantel's 2009 Man Booker Prize winner and New York Times best seller, Wolf Hall delves into the heart of Tudor history with the downfall of Anne Boleyn. Though he battled for seven years to marry her, Henry is disenchanted with Anne Boleyn. She has failed to give him a son and her sharp intelligence and audacious will alienate his old friends and the noble families of England. When the discarded Katherine dies in exile from the court, Anne stands starkly exposed, the focus of gossip and malice. At a word from Henry, Thomas Cromwell is ready to bring her down. Over three terrifying weeks, Anne is ensnared in a web of conspiracy, while the demure Jane Seymour stands waiting her turn for the poisoned wedding ring. But Anne and her powerful family will not yield without a ferocious struggle. Hilary Mantel's Bring Up the Bodies follows the dramatic trial of the queen and her suitors for adultery and treason. To defeat the Boleyns, Cromwell must ally with his natural enemies, the papist aristocracy. What price will he pay for Anne's head?

©2012 Hilary Mantel (P)2012 Macmillan Audio

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  •  
    Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States 11-22-12
    Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States 11-22-12 Member Since 2011

    A part-time buffoon and ersatz scholar specializing in BS, pedantry, schmaltz and cultural coprophagia.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Mantel Pulls the History out of the History"

    100 pages in and it is hard to miss that this isn't just a nominal sequel to Wolf Hall, but rather the first book's logical annex. There is no drop-off in complexity. No laxity of language. Still Mantel manages to shift form, change structure and reinvent her style. She even manages to give the character of Thomas Cromwell more depth and complexity, a feat which seemed near impossible after finishing Wolf Hall.

    Anyway, Mantel is one of the finest writers of English prose living. Each sentence is crafted like a unique piece in an Italian inlaid music box. She has a purpose for each comma and can make words seem to dance, fall and recover right off the page. She pulls the history out of the history and has written Tower interrogations so deft and chilling, one is left afraid of both language and the law. As readers, we watch Cromwell destroy men, overthrow queens, and change history with words, paper and a sharp understanding of men's motives. We aren't afraid because Cromwell is a monster, but because he is so heroically human.

    40 of 40 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carol Meissner Putnam County, NY 06-26-12
    Carol Meissner Putnam County, NY 06-26-12 Member Since 2012
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    "Remarkable story of how to kill off a queen..."

    If you do not find intrigue breathtaking, don't read this well written and well researched book. Hilary Mantel is my new favorite author, and what a remarkable writer and teller -of-tales she is! Her writing is dense, insightful, and rich in nuance. She takes the story of Anne Boleyn and makes it come to life (and death), as witnessed through the actions of Thomas Cromwell, one of King Henry VIII's chief counselors. It appears no accusations can be too bold, and no recriminations too slanderous if you are king and want to be rid of a wife you just spent ten years courting into marriage. The dicotomy of a king's whim and a queen's rights could not be more opposite, and if you can rid yourself of a few extra people along the way, why not...

    13 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Teddy Bronx, NY, United States 06-12-13
    Teddy Bronx, NY, United States 06-12-13 Member Since 2011

    "A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one." - Jojen Reed. #ADanceWithDragons

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    "Enjoyed this one!"

    I am slowly but surely becoming a fan of Hillary Mantel here. The combination between her and Simon Vance is was very much fitting here. Most persons I have heard speaking about "Bring Up the Bodies" generally tends to say that they preferred the book in the series, "Wolf Hall", to this. Personally though, I found that I enjoyed "Bring Up the Bodies" more.

    I've always liked to read about this particular era in British History... the era of the Boleyn's. The downfall of Anne and the sensationalism that surrounded this time is something that I would never predict to happen in real life. Seeing what happens through the vantage point of Thomas Cromwell is pretty fascinating if you ask me. Having to manipulate and contort the law the way he did to fit the whims and fancies of the King of England at the time, Henry VIII. The narration was what I have come to expect from Simon Vance to be honest. Simply flawless.

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ry Young College Station, TX United States 09-18-12
    Ry Young College Station, TX United States 09-18-12 Member Since 2007

    Molecular biology professor and researcher. I love history, historical fiction and future/alternate history. Mostly I listen while jogging, about 30-45 min per day.

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    "Perfection in story and the telling"
    Would you listen to Bring Up the Bodies again? Why?

    After listening to this and the preceding Wolf Hall, I despair of ever having so much satisfaction on an audiobook and its performance. Mantel's writing is exquisite. Each sentence is carefully crafted, balanced, purposeful. The story is amusing, engrossing, horrifying, comforting, and always compelling. If feels like history but somehow one is transported into Cromwell's head and behind his eyes.

    And Vance must feel the same way I do. His reading...his performance....is absolutely spot on.

    I will NOT enjoy any other book, or pair of books, as much. It's all downhill from here.

    I just wish we would get another volume...perhaps it will yet come. The last words in the book state that the end is the beginning.


    What other book might you compare Bring Up the Bodies to and why?

    I feel like I have had a course in Tudor history, but with a lot more of the important social and economic detail than you would ever get in a classroom.


    Have you listened to any of Simon Vance’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Pure magic. Seriously, there must be a lot of scholarship....the details are so dense and believable. But the primary thing is the lyrical writing.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    It was too short.


    Any additional comments?

    Regret that I am done with it. Play it again, Sam.

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Theodore WATERBURY, VT, United States 05-13-12
    Theodore WATERBURY, VT, United States 05-13-12 Member Since 2003
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    "Superb even if you missed Wolf Hall"
    Any additional comments?

    Hilary Mantel makes every detail of the Tudor soap opera brand new, immediate and "can't stop listening" powerful.

    Her present-tense prose works better read-aloud, at least with so fine a reader.

    Cromwell as villain is nuanced by a detailed imagining of his life, his memories, his musings late at night, and even imagining a detained suspect locked, in the dark in the family Christmas closet (puts light on similar stories about More locking heretics in his basement for easier interrogation).

    Okay, there will be a volume 3 for sure, or even a volume per wife, but boat loads of us will be waiting for them.

    20 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Archie United States 05-17-12
    Archie United States 05-17-12 Member Since 2002
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    "A Wonderfully Nuanced Book"

    I think that Hilary Mantel is an wonderful author. Her story telling; her use of language; her ability to bring to life a far away period of time weaves a literary spell. I wish the book had been twice as long!!

    Now I need to wait for her to write/complete the final book in this triology.

    The England of Hilary Mantel is totalitarian state. Simon Vance, one of my favorite readers, reads this book beautifully but, all the same, his voice lacks the necessary malevolence that the narrator of Wolf Hall was able to achieve.

    I hope that Audible will soon bring Hilary Mantel's other books into their library.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Richard Shalhoub Medford, MA, United States 06-07-12
    Richard Shalhoub Medford, MA, United States 06-07-12 Member Since 2007

    Dually addicted bookie. Read and listen to most books together. If I don't like reader of audible I dump it and move on.

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    "Wolf Hall Part 2 does not disappoint"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I'd recommend it anyone who has enjoyed reading "Wolf Hall" or enjoyed listening to Simon Slater's rendering of Part 1. It seems about half as long.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The character of Thomas Cromwell...brilliant and badass...


    What does Simon Vance bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    The dialogue has an additional dimension...and the story requires a superior reader...which Vance is...as was Simon Slater in Wolf Hall.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    Yes...a number of laughs at the wit of Mantel's channeling of Cromwell.


    Any additional comments?

    I don't know why Simon Slater wasn't chosen to read...since his rendering of Wolf Hall was one of the greatest performances I've heard but Vance does a very good job of it...and the Cromwell voice choices he makes echo Slater's in the earlier book. Hilary Mantel is a superb writer...a witty and brilliant vision of how things may have been in a very mean and ruthless time period. I enjoyed seeing the fall of several of Cromwell's (and Woolsley's) enemies.

    9 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kathleen Minneapolis, MN, USA 09-29-12
    Kathleen Minneapolis, MN, USA 09-29-12 Member Since 2005
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    "Sequel to Wolf Hall. Very good."

    This is the sequel to Hilary Mantel’s award-winning “Wolf Hall”. Here we follow Thomas Cromwell, secretary and advisor to King Henry VIII to the beheading of Anne Boleyn. While King henry was enamoured of Anne Boleyn for seven years, which included his divorce and annulment of his 20-year marriage to Katherine of Aragon, his exiting from the Catholic church and starting his own church in England, and his ultimate marriage to Anne, he soon becomes disenchanted with her. Their marriage lasts three years; no son is born alive, and only a daughter, Elizabeth, lives. Katherine finally dies, and within a few weeks of her death, the gossip surrounding Anne grows to a climax as people perceive the king is willing to hear rumors and innuendos about her unfaithfulness to him. Again, Thomas Cromwell is the primary focus of the novel and we see events unfold through his eyes. We see a man who rose to his high office but remains, so far as nobility is concerned, a commoner. He has dedicated his life and service to King Henry VIII but with no illusions that the king and the nobility could turn on him in a moment. He retains his position through his wit, intelligence and long memory regarding the people around him. The weeks involving Anne Boleyn’s trial, and the trial of other men tried for treason for allegedly taking liberties with her, is terrifying. The actual beheading of Anne Boleyn is gut wrenching, particularly when you learn that she must kneel but will have no block to rest her head on. She must kneel perfectly still in one place so the head will come off with one stroke. Reading about this period reminds me very much of the French Revolution period of chaos. I don’t know if Mantel plans more books leading to the eventual downfall of Cromwell or if this is it. Simon Vance does his usual wonderful job of narration with each character having its own vocal expressions, Cromwell always remaining slightly remote and cool. I assume this book will get some awards as well. It is very good.

    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Doggy Bird Glen Ridge, NJ USA 07-05-12
    Doggy Bird Glen Ridge, NJ USA 07-05-12 Member Since 2001

    doggybird

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    "Wonderful narration, beautifully told tale"

    Simon Vance does such a good job narrating this sequel to Wolf Hall I listened a second time just to savor it again. Very strong images and rhythmic text, dialogue enhanced by reading as the different voices and personalities are distinct and add flavor. Shorter than the first book due to a much tighter time frame, this book concerns only the fall of Anne Boleyn. Important events of Cromwell's life are revisited helping to illuminate objects and memories for readers who have not read the first volume. Fascinating view of a well known historical event as imagined by the author from the point of view of Thomas Cromwell, it is particularly of interest for those who are familiar with this period of history.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kimberly VERONA, PA, United States 06-13-12
    Kimberly VERONA, PA, United States 06-13-12 Member Since 2008
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    "Not up to Wolf Hall's standards"
    If you could sum up Bring Up the Bodies in three words, what would they be?

    condemned by infertility


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Thomas Cromwell remains my favorite character because in him we see the makings of a statesman who held his own with royalty. Indeed, Henry VIII does not understand yet just how valuable Cromwell is. Cromwell is one of the few common men of humble birth who has ever been able to ascend to the pinnacle of power without having to be born into it or win it by combat. He is an everyman, a bureaucrat and a bit of a polymath. Kind to his servants, intuitive about what motivates people and skillful at using that motivation to benefit his king and country. He behaves humbly around those who think they are his betters but his humility is just a ruse. He subtly asserts himself and no one puts Cromwell in a corner.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    The scene where Henry is knocked unconscious during a jousting tourney is my favorite. Suddenly, everyone's ambitions are revealed. But Cromwell puts his state and country first by defending the body of the king and he does this because he knows how close the country still is to a civil war. This scene is particularly well written and one can only imagine what Cromwell saw in the eyes of the dukes and other high level courtiers when the chance to sieze the throne was only a breath away.
    One can only imagine what the courtiers saw in Cromwell's eyes and whether this was the moment of realization that lead to his eventual downfall. It was a moment when ancient feudal rite met modernity and for a moment, the feudalists blinked.


    Who was the most memorable character of Bring Up the Bodies and why?

    Jane Seymour comes across as a very clever girl. Maybe it wasn't always her goal to become queen, like Anne Boleyn, but Jane was someone who took advantage of opportunity and used her naturally reserved demeanor to promote her family. She's more like a cunning fox than a wolf.


    Any additional comments?

    My biggest problem with this book is that it hold up well in comparison to Wolf Hall. I realize that some listeners may have had problems with Wolf Hall because it is written in a non-linear style, part historical fiction, part biography. It tended to meander a bit with parts of Cromwell's domestic and inner life juxtaposing with current events in a not altogether easy to follow manner. But these are minor quibbles for a listener. Hilary Mantel is an author of extraordinarily lovely and powerful language. I was completely swept away by Wolf Hall because I had such a clear picture of what made Cromwell tick.
    But Bring Up The Bodies seems to have "benefitted" from a more rigorous editing step. Someone slashed the size of this book down to an more manageable size but left a lot of material on the cutting room floor. Virtually nothing is said of the histories of the men who went to the scaffold with Anne. Some information comes through in their interviews with Cromwell but this is quick and not well fleshed out. We still don't know why Henry cut Anne off after her last miscarriage. I thought miscarriages were more common back then so there had to be another reason, perhaps medical, why Henry didn't think Anne would ever produce a son. There's no insight from doctors where they are saying, "Ah, yes, we've seen this kind of thing before. The first child is healthy but no other children live. No one knows why but we have seen that some families are plagued with it."
    And then there is the motivation of Cromwell himself. It sounds like a combination of just serving the king and the desire to wreck revenge on the courtiers who continually pushed their social superiority in his face. I am unconvinced. It could be the lack of documentation but if anything, the earlier parts of Cromwell's life were more sparsely documented while this part was historic. Where Mantel allowed her mind to wander in Cromwell's in the first book, making for a coherent and consistent picture of this complex man, she pulls back in the second leaving Cromwell's personal feelings and motivations more mysterious and inscrutable. He comes across as more Iago than a Renaissance man, leaving us to continue to puzzle over the Anne Boleyn incident and his role in it. What a shame. She needn't have hurried the second book. Some things take time and need to develop at their own rate. I hope she reverts to form with the third book.

    8 of 10 people found this review helpful
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