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Rework | [Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson]

Rework

With its straightforward language and easy-is-better approach, Rework is the perfect playbook for anyone who's ever dreamed of doing it on their own. Hardcore entrepreneurs, small-business owners, people stuck in day jobs who want to get out, and artists who don't want to starve anymore will all find valuable inspiration and guidance in these pages. It's time to rework work.
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Audible Editor Reviews

"Rework takes aim at marketing, hiring, and other disciplines associated with building a business as if they were bottles lined up against a wall. Then it blows them away...Fried and Hansson are the Henry David Thoreaus of entrepreneurship." (Leigh Buchanan, Inc. Magazine)
"Rework is a Webby manifesto for post-recession success. Forget about strategic planning, [the authors] advise. And ignore your competition - unless you feel like picking a public fight." (Nick Summers, Newsweek)
"I want to buy a copy for everyone I know either to validate their current business practices or to expose them to alternative ways of doing things." (Alexis Rodich, Washington Post)

Publisher's Summary

From the founders of the trailblazing software company 37signals, here is a different kind of business book one that explores a new reality. Today, anyone can be in business. Tools that used to be out of reach are now easily accessible. Technology that cost thousands is now just a few bucks or even free. Stuff that was impossible just a few years ago is now simple.That means anyone can start a business. And you can do it without working miserable 80-hour weeks or depleting your life savings. You can start it on the side while your day job provides all the cash flow you need. Forget about business plans, meetings, office space - you don't need them.

With its straightforward language and easy-is-better approach, Rework is the perfect playbook for anyone who's ever dreamed of doing it on their own. Hardcore entrepreneurs, small-business owners, people stuck in day jobs who want to get out, and artists who don't want to starve anymore will all find valuable inspiration and guidance in these pages. It's time to rework work.

©2010 Jason Fried (P)2010 Random House

What Members Say

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  •  
    Paul Seymour, MO, USA 06-18-10
    Paul Seymour, MO, USA 06-18-10
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    "Simple, Quick, Timely, Contrarian Advice"

    An excellent look at the work ethic of a very successful software company that does everything according to its own rules.

    Best takeaways:
    - Work is not just something you do 40 hours a week, it's work. Maybe it takes 10 hours, or maybe it takes 80 hours a week.
    - If you're taking more than 40 hours a week to work, you're not working efficiently.
    - Your employees are not 13 year olds... stop treating them like they are.
    - Be very slow to hire.
    - Growth doesn't equal success, sometimes growth is girth.
    - Planning is guessing.
    - If deciding between a few people for a position, hire the best writer - clear writing is a sign of clear thinking and an ability to communicate.

    I entered the corporate structure very late in life, after owning my own business, and I've always thought the same way these guys apparently think.

    My only complaint, is I would have liked some more real world examples and experiences, but my guess is they originally had more, but pulled stories out to make the book more brief and to the point.

    They even say, at one point that in the final draft, they cut the book into half as many words as they had originally wrote.

    Mike Chamberlain is an excellent narrator, and really added to the experience.

    30 of 32 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Grant NANTUCKET, MA, United States 10-16-11
    Grant NANTUCKET, MA, United States 10-16-11 Member Since 2008

    caffeinated

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    "Some good ideas. Some not."

    I liked some of the thoughts in Rework. The idea that set company policies equal organizational scar tissue is spot on. Planning = guessing is an original thought. And some of the hiring practices ??? like not hiring "supermen" and working in the position you are filling before you fill it ??? make good sense.

    Then again, there are a number of ideas in Rework that are just plain wrong. Smaller isn't always better. Yes, if you make software, small works because once you develop something, the growth comes from incremental sales. And your channel is virtually frictionless. But what if what you sell is time and experience? Then, the fewer bodies you have working, the less money you make. And what if you make pencil erasers? You still need to hire bodies to manufacture, transport and sell your product.

    Another idea that's just wrong is the notion that it's better to write a blog and rely on free social media than to use traditional media like PR and advertising. This may be true of some products, and it's especially true of web-based products, but many businesses, like retail, food and manufactured goods, could not function without traditional media. It really depends upon what you are selling.

    On top of all this, many of the "observations" that the authors make about business today ??? how meetings are toxic and sampling a product is a good practice, and saying ASAP is meaningless and counterproductive ??? are right out of a Dilbert cartoon. Without he humor. Business people, at least the smart ones, know these things already. There's no insight offered here. Yet the authors treat these subjects like they're the first people to ever think of them.

    From the number of times the authors used the words "suck," "sh-t" and "f--k," and the brash, sanctimonious, we're-brilliant-and-your-a-moron tone of the text (and perhaps the narrator shaded that part a bit) the reader is left with a feeling that Fried and Heinemeir are nothing more than a couple of young guys who think they have the business world figured out. But they really don't.

    For the record, I use 37Signals products. I think they are brilliant, clean and powerful. But just because a company does a few things right, that does not make them experts on everything.

    17 of 18 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Porter Goodyear, AZ, USA 04-03-10
    Porter Goodyear, AZ, USA 04-03-10 Member Since 2009
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    "I wish more books were like this."

    This book has a lot of good and useful information. Much of the info is actionable. I wish more books were like this, it was short and to the point and didn't spend hours building up to one small idea. I highly recommend this book for both new ideas and as a refresher for forgotten knowledge.

    17 of 18 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jason Waterloo, Ontario, Canada 05-03-10
    Jason Waterloo, Ontario, Canada 05-03-10 Member Since 2010
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    "Great... but not for everyone"

    For me personally, I loved the audio book. Very simple, very direct and full of little pieces of wisdom. However, it is quite industry specific. Some of the principles he speaks about are universal but most are very specific to small businesses and starting businesses particularly in the technology field. That is where I am so I found the book to be exactly what I wanted to hear. I listened to it 3 times over a 2 week period. Again, not for everyone but if you are running a small business, want to start a small business or just want to turn a hobby into some income, he gives great tips to do it. Very practical and to the point.

    12 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Vicky Thorneside, QLD, Australia 06-24-10
    Vicky Thorneside, QLD, Australia 06-24-10 Member Since 2007
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    "Good for SOME Businesses"

    This is a good for small to medium business in some markets, but in others it is quite inappropriate in parts.

    If you want to read this, what you should consider is that the authors are writing about their experience, and their experience is providing online services. That means no stock issues, ability to automatically supply at any time etc etc.

    There are also a few parts that when you have been in business a while, you will see the obvious contradictions. My favourite was that you have to speak your mind and say if something is no good, but an earlier comment was avoid office politics at all costs. Now there's a contradiction. Telling someone there project is to be canned means that egos will be bruised and you will have to enter into office politics or they will quickly leave!

    Another small company centric point was, trying out potential employees by giving them a short term contract. If you work in a large company, the job is often not contractable, so there is no way you could do this.

    As I say, and interesting read, but you need to consider who the authors are, and where their experience in business comes from.

    11 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dan L?sningDenmark 03-24-10
    Dan L?sningDenmark 03-24-10 Member Since 2010
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    "Inspiring and fun"

    This book is so funny and well read by Mike Chamberlain. He understands to get the direct language from the book out in the meaning it was meant to be. The book itself is very inspiring and brings up lots of issues that new start-ups or stressed-out employees face and could help them to focus and get their jobs done without the stress involved.

    13 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Matt St. Louis, MO, USA 05-04-10
    Matt St. Louis, MO, USA 05-04-10 Member Since 2010
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    "A little too preachy for my taste"

    I enjoy 37 Signals' SVN blog, and there is no doubt they've had a tremendous amount of success doing what they do. However, as a casual reader of their blog, Rework appears to be a rehashing of previous points made via SVN, and comes off as a little too preachy for my taste. Still there are some nuggets in here to enjoy, and it's a very short listen.

    If you have spare credits I wouldn't hesitate to download this book, but in my opinion there are many more credit-worthy titles to choose from.

    19 of 23 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael Penza, Russia 03-13-10
    Michael Penza, Russia 03-13-10
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    "Thought provoking, ever after Getting Real"

    Even though I read Getting Real, a previous book by David and Jason, some 4 times, Rework is definitely thought provoking and inspiring. I do not agree on all topics, and some of them apply only to software industry, but the time definitely has come to "rework work". Or at least re-think what is possible with modern technology, and why people would even care about some mainstream ideas and ways of doing business originating in 18th century.

    What is especially valuable is that this book is written from personal experience and perspective. If you ever thought of starting a company, Rework will be useful for you.

    9 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joshua Kim Etna, NH, United States 06-10-12
    Joshua Kim Etna, NH, United States 06-10-12

    mostly nonfiction listener

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    "How We Work"

    The first book that I'm going to give to my learning and technology team is Rework, by the guys from 37Signals.

    288 concise pages - or less than 3 hours in unabridged audio format. We need more books to be this good and this short.

    37Signals is best known for its simple, cloud based project management tool Basecamp.

    I'm a Basecamp client, and have been using the tool productively for a few years now. If you have ever had to do a project with MS Project, or solely by e-mail and spreadsheets, than you will appreciate the simplicity, elegance, and flexibility of Basecamp.

    The founders of 37Signals developed Basecamp to manage their own internal projects, only then realizing they had a service on their hands that other small teams would find useful. Basecamp requires no support from your central IT organization, no local hardware, and no expertise in project management. You can be up and running with a free 30 day trial in 60 seconds. Plans start at $24 a month.

    Basecamp is not just a product but also a philosophy. Less features well done are better than many features that complicate a product. Offer services that are lightweight and agile, and resist the urge to meet the needs of every customer. Let your customer outgrow your product. Basecamp is the physical (or digital?) manifestation of the philosophy of work that 37Signals is selling in Rework. The company prides itself on keeping operations lean, costs down, working arrangements flexible, and paid marketing to a minimum. If you work for 37Signals you don't attend many meetings, don't write many strategic plans, and don't give many internal presentations. You are expected and encouraged to carve out quiet time for productive work, to share your work product early and often, and to be open to criticism.

    What you are not expected to do is work insane hours, sacrifice family or sleep time, or set unrealistic deadlines or goals.

    It could be that 37Signals got lucky with Basecamp, and are falling into the fallacy of assuming that their work culture is an optimal culture because it produced Basecamp. The other products from 37Signals, Highrise (contact tracking), Backpack (Intranet), and Campfire (code sharing) have not enjoyed nearly the same level of success as Basecamp.
    We know from Leonard Mlodinow's book, The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives, that we all under-estimate the role of chance in our successes and failures. Nor is the advice in Rework particularly original. Experts like James O'Toole have long been recommending more flexible and less hierarchal workplaces.

    What is different about Rework is that the founders of 37Signals are pitching their ideas at a level that can work with small teams on the sorts of projects and tasks that we all do. Anyone in charge of rolling out and supporting new learning technology services will benefit from reading Rework. You don't need a top-down re-org or permission from your leadership to make our products and team interactions more like those of 37Signals. We are all in some measure complacent in meeting cultures , reliances on committees, and the putting off of "shipping" new services until that mythical time the platform meets everyone's needs.

    Rework should provoke a good discussion of how your team does things differently from how the team at 37Signals approaches tasks. In the end you may not decide to adopt all of the recommendations in Rework, but I guarantee that this book cause you to take a hard look at how your group operates.

    Any Basecamp users want to jump in on the service? What do you think about the idea of writing a short book like Rework that spells out your work culture philosophy and the thinking behind the services you offer?

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    donny epp Fayetteville, AR 03-26-12
    donny epp Fayetteville, AR 03-26-12 Listener Since 2010
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    "Great Book - mainly motivational"

    I love 37signals and a lot of what they stand for. This book is consistent with their brand and positioning... and I appreciate that. It's a motivational huzzah for being reasonable in how you work. It's confirmation that you CAN just make a great product and do good business and be profitable. It speaks plainly and cuts through a lot of the crap in our start up environment today.

    It's absolutely worth a listen, but you might not come out on the other end having experienced some sort of cathartic epiphany about work either.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 91 results PREVIOUS1210NEXT
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  • Thomas
    DoncasterUnited Kingdom
    9/25/10
    Overall
    "Think for yourself"

    This book does have some good things to say about starting with a new business but (and this is just my opinion) it strikes me like a lot of books of this type as lacking a bit in substance and also as prescribing set approaches to situations, when in fact the best thing to do is to weigh each up as you see them.

    For example, in this book they say start small and build from a small base, don't give up the day job straight away and generally take it steady in the beginning. This may be the best strategy in some situations, but not necessarily in all situations.

    There are a bunch of other books out there which tell you to always try to think big, and take risks, make the leap etc... which may be the right thing to do in your situation, or it may not. What I'm trying to say is that though the book IS useful and good food for thought, it basically represents one company's way of doing things, not a universal panacea. The real skill is to adapt your strategy to the circumstance.

    There's also the business of backing both sides in a couple of cases. For example, they suggest enforce a strict 'no-distractions' atmosphere at work and then later on say that in fact banning people from using facebook at work is bad because people actually need distractions.

    Also didn't like the swearing towards the end, but that's just a personal thing. As I say it's got some interesting stuff but nothing groundbreaking or particularly inspirational. Think and Grow Rich or the 48 Laws of Power it ain't...

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Dave
    Cannock, Staffordshire, United Kingdom
    4/13/10
    Overall
    "Reworked - good book but somethings"

    This was a great audiobook that definatley challenges the normal mindset of most entrpreneurs.

    I would say the tendandcy to go against anything 'normal' was slightly over-exagerated (although i guess that was the point) as not all businesses can run like 37signals do, especially larger companies that require more rigidity to operate.

    Having said that, as a small company owner almost everything in this book made total sense and Im happy to say a lot of it we already practice in our business. Keep up the good work guys, we love your products and use them daily.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • greg
    BELFAST, United Kingdom
    5/13/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Just do it,worry later it seems"

    The book has a positive message although sometimes their devil may care, just do it and worry about it later approach is almost comedic.Forget a business plan and strip down your product or design to it's bare essentials and just go for it,seems to be the message from the authors. Motivational if you have some anxiety about taking that last step,but I've tried that approach myself a few times and it is the best way to get into debt and fall flat on your face. If you want to listen to an enjoyable, motivational book then this is ok. If you're a go for it now and worry about the detail later type of guy and have some spare cash to take a bet, then I guess just go for it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Gustav
    London, United Kingdom
    8/19/12
    Overall
    "Didn't really help me rework my work"

    I got this book because I was ready to make the move into self-directed work. The book promises great advice on this topic. It has some advice, but nothing ground breaking.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Derek
    London, United Kingdom
    6/21/11
    Overall
    "No insights"

    This is just a lot of quasi-motivational drivel. Unless you need a book to tell you that you could start a business in your spare time without giving up your job or that going to bed an hour later gives you more time in your day (!) then you should avoid this.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Des
    7/7/10
    Overall
    "wow"

    I don't care if you are in business or not this is a great book
    and it is short on purpose. Everyone should hear it in the working world...........

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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