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Linked: The New Science of Networks | [Albert-Laszlo Barabasi]

Linked: The New Science of Networks

Albert-Laszlo Barabasi traces the fascinating history of connected systems. Understanding the structure and behavior of networks will forever alter our world, allowing us to design the "perfect" business or stop a disease outbreak before it goes global.
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Publisher's Summary

From a cocktail party to a terrorist cell, from an ancient bacteria to an international conglomerate - all are networks, and all are part of a surprising scientific revolution. A maverick group of scientists is discovering that all networks have a deep underlying order and operate according to simple but powerful rules. This knowledge promises to shed light on the spread of fads and viruses, the robustness of ecosystems, the vulnerability of economies - even the future of democracy.

Now, for the first time, a scientist whose own work has transformed the study of "links and nodes" takes us inside the unfolding network revolution. Albert-Laszlo Barabasi traces the fascinating history of connected systems, beginning with mathematician Leonhard Euler's first forays into graph theory in the late 1700s and culminating in biologists' development of cancer drugs based on a new understanding of cellular networks.

Combining narrative flare with sparkling insights, Barabasi introduces us to the myriad modern-day "cartographers" mapping networks in a range of scientific disciplines. Aided by powerful computers, they are proving that social networks, corporations, and cells are more similar than they are different. Their discoveries provide an important new perspective on the interconnected world around us.

Linked reveals how Google came to be the Internet's most popular search engine, how Vernon Jordan's social network affects the entire American economy, what it would take to bring down a terrorist organization like al Qaeda, and why an obscure finding of Einstein's could change the way we look at the networks in our own lives. Understanding the structure and behavior of networks will forever alter our world, allowing us to design the "perfect" business or stop a disease outbreak before it goes global.

Engaging and authoritative, Linked provides an exciting preview of the next century in science.

Also available in print from Perseus Publishing.

Executive Producer: Karen DiMattia
Jacket design by Alex Camlin
©2002 Albert-Laszlo Barabasi
(P)2002 Random House, Inc.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.9 (888 )
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4.1 (154 )
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  •  
    Richard Tampa, FL, USA 04-08-04
    Richard Tampa, FL, USA 04-08-04 Member Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
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    "Thank your Albert"

    This book is both instructive and entertaining. I have continuously recommended it to curious, intelligent, people, who want to know how the laws of networks permeate our lives and physical world. I am listening to it for the third time. RAW

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dan'l Leviton CA United States 11-26-05
    Dan'l Leviton CA United States 11-26-05 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    9
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    "Puffery"

    I was very disappointed in this lightweight listen. The author is extremely proud of some elementary results that seem obvious to anyone with a serious math or comp. sci. background. He has so little to say that he repeats it many times. Links on the internet are not random! Are you amazed?

    To make a book out of what should have been a short article, he then predicts marvellous advances in medicine based on his "discoveries," completely disregarding the problems of production and economic issues. If nanotechnology succeeds, will networkologists take credit?

    A final nit: He uses the spread of AIDS as an example of a network, with patients as nodes and sexual contacts as links. However, many of his "facts" are wrong--he propagates myths that support his points but do not stand up under scrutiny. AIDS is not a "pandemic". People aren't virtually certain to die with 10 years of infection with HIV. Heterosexual contact does not spread AIDS. Kaposi's sarcoma is not caused by HIV and is not contagious.

    This book did not teach me anything. Just a glimpse into how self-important academics can become.

    9 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Greg Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada 10-05-03
    Greg Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada 10-05-03 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Excellent even for a Non-Science Guy"

    I found the book extremely helpful in my understanding of community networks. There was enough science to connect the book to the "science approach." Nevertheless, it brought the ideas of networks outside of the normal scientific arena. As an educator I was able to use the concepts of networks in my own world of community building. I also love computers and the internet, thus finding these comparisons very helpful. Well done and worth my time.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Martin Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 07-26-05
    Martin Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 07-26-05 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Dissenting Voice -"

    I found this this book disappointing and repetitive.

    It seemed a classic example of three interesting points spun out into a book-length treatment. The authors seemed unsure whether they were writing an instructional book for business networking, an academic treatise on networking theory, or their own curricula vitae. The result is maddeningly dry and circular.

    The exhaustive explanation, discussion and criticism of obviously flawed and outdated networking theories is nothing but filler and occupies the bulk of book. Their unsupported extrapolations to politics and society are spurious and frequently laughable. Anyone interested in the subject should buy the paper version instead and skim aggressively.

    10 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    shopper 05-22-11
    shopper 05-22-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Euler is pronounced "Oil"er, not "Eye"er"

    F for the narrator. He obviously doesn't have a science background, which would be ok if only he would take the trouble to pronounce words correctly. With an audiobook, the pronunciation is key - the reader has no other means to know what the he*l is written down.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eduarda Guelph, Ontario, Canada 11-20-08
    Eduarda Guelph, Ontario, Canada 11-20-08
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Scientific and great information about networks"

    If you always wonder how 'small' our world is and how people are all interconnected to each other in this 'web', you will enjoy this book. Full of great real life examples and network theories. Be aware that lots of scientific wording, theories and examples are used in this book.. And if you don't like this type of technicalities, you may get bored and the book probably won't hold your attention.

    I have a general science background and I loved this book because it relates our day-to-day network experiences to scientific theories. In special, I think people from the IT industry (or if you're keen on computers and internet) will find this book very interesting as the author uses lots of examples related to this industry.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paul Mullen Waukesha, WI 06-14-06
    Paul Mullen Waukesha, WI 06-14-06 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Not just a"

    I read this based on a colleague's recommendation, thinking I would spend most of my time thinking about networks in the sense of the "Internet." True, the internet is a prominent feature of the book, but the books real genius in its ability to see connectedness in economies, biology, social circles, and more.

    Though written for a lay audience, parts of the book may get a little technical for some people's taste. But it is certainly not out of reach for those with at least some techno-tolerance.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Yicheng Phoenix, AZ, USA 01-04-06
    Yicheng Phoenix, AZ, USA 01-04-06
    HELPFUL VOTES
    173
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    "Great stuff"

    This is a great book if you have a mind for math/logic. As a programmer I found great interest in the talk of highly connected networks as a new model of looking at the world. Wonderful listen, and definitely worth a second, third, or fourth time if are into the subject.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Doing-fine-in-FLA Florida United States 10-24-05
    Doing-fine-in-FLA Florida United States 10-24-05 Listener Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
    18
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    "Connects the Dots?"

    If you are interested in Artificial Intelligence, E-Business, or politics this book will tickle your neurons and tighten your synapses. Take the book in whole rather than approach each chapter as a separate lesson. Those unfamiliar with mathematics theory should understand that the early chapters deal with theories that the later chapters prove inapplicable to scale-free networks and the World Wide Web. So do not throw the baby out with the bathwater.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Philip Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 03-26-05
    Philip Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 03-26-05 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Life Changing"

    This is one of those must read books which change the way you look at the world around you.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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