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Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? | [Jeanette Winterson]

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

Jeanette Winterson’s bold and revelatory novels have established her as a major figure in world literature. This memoir is the chronicle of a life’s work to find happiness. It is a book full of stories: about a girl locked out of her home, sitting on the doorstep all night; about a religious zealot disguised as a mother who has two sets of false teeth and a revolver in the dresser drawer; about growing up in a north England industrial town in the 1960s and 1970s; and about the universe as a cosmic dustbin.
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Publisher's Summary

Jeanette Winterson’s bold and revelatory novels have established her as a major figure in world literature. She has written some of the most acclaimed books of the last three decades, including her internationally bestselling first novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, the story of a young girl adopted by Pentecostal parents that is considered one of the most important books in contemporary fiction. Jeanette’s adoptive mother loomed over her life until Jeanette finally moved out at sixteen because she was in love with a woman. As Jeanette left behind the strict confines of her youth, her mother asked, “Why be happy when you could be normal?”

This memoir is the chronicle of a life’s work to find happiness. It is a book full of stories: about a girl locked out of her home, sitting on the doorstep all night; about a religious zealot disguised as a mother who has two sets of false teeth and a revolver in the dresser drawer; about growing up in a north England industrial town in the 1960s and 1970s; and about the universe as a cosmic dustbin. It is the story of how a painful past, which Winterson thought she had written over and repainted, rose to haunt her later in life, sending her on a journey into madness and out again, in search of her biological mother. It is also a book about literature, one that shows how fiction and poetry can guide us when we are lost. Witty, acute, fierce, and celebratory, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? is a tough-minded search for belonging - for love, identity, and a home.

©2011 Jeanette Winterson (P)2012 Brilliance Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"To read Jeanette Winterson is to love her. . . . The fierce, curious, brilliant British writer is winningly candid in Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? . . . [Winterson has] such a joy for life and love and language that she quickly becomes her very own one-woman bandone that, luckily for us, keeps playing on." (O, the Oprah Magazine)

"Moving, honest . . . Rich in detail and the history of the northern English town of Accrington, Winterson's narrative allows readers to ponder, along with the author, the importance of feeling wanted and loved." (Kirkus Reviews)

"Raw . . . A highly unusual, scrupulously honest, and endearing memoir." (Publishers Weekly, Starred Review)

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  •  
    glamazon The Coast of Rhode Island 03-20-12
    glamazon The Coast of Rhode Island 03-20-12 Member Since 2003

    glam

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The Title Says It All"

    I wanted to read this book from the moment I read a review in the New York Times. The title grabbed me by my inner truths and would not let me go, and I relate because my mother had the same philosophy, if she could even be said to have a "philosophy". It's the overall general sense of being "happy" vs being "normal" that got to me - not the specifics of Winterson's life. My mother, too, was big on being "normal" and also felt that being happy was an offshoot of arrogance - like "who are you to deserve happiness?" I am not attempting to define happiness here, just saying the idea was always presented as an unreachable ideal, only given to a privileged few, with the rest of us required to trudge along, suffering and miserable.

    Anyway, the narration took some time getting used to - I initially found Ms. Winterson's voice to be a bit strident, with an accent I couldn't quite place, but I gradually acclimated and found a receptive space where I could listen with more peace. The accent and patterns of speech actually work to help create the ambience of mid-20th century Manchester, England.

    I like that Winterson's description of the renaissance-like evolution and development of Manchester - from its dark days as Britain's foremost manufacturing town into a prosperous arcade of high-end consumer pleasures such as restaurants, art galleries, new housing created from vacated mill buildings - parallels her own journey of self-dicovery and reclamation.

    The memoir proceeds chronologically, but sometimes it's not quite clear where we are in Winterson's life. Not a problem though, as things eventually do clear up, and the surface randomness of the story does not devolve into confusion for the reader; due to the beauty of the writing, sometimes it does not really matter. WInterson herself admits to not writing in a linear style, preferring a less structured way of selecting her scenes.

    Although this is another story about growing up with a mother who is very odd in so many ways, unwilling and unable to show love, perhaps even to feel it, this narrative has its own animus, and I, as a reader, never tire of this subject nor of this genre. Winterson's rise from her very inauspicious and soul-destroying roots into triumph like the Phoenix from the ashes is a story that can be told again and again.

    36 of 37 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Suzn F Fletcher, VT, US 02-22-13
    Suzn F Fletcher, VT, US 02-22-13 Member Since 2005

    I believe a reviewer should finish a book before submitting a review. What do you think?

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A Slow Rollercoaster, chugging up towards the end"

    I'm not sure what drew me to this book, the other reviews I think.
    Ms. Winterson tells us at some point (I loved that she was the narrator BTW) that she is writing in real time. As soon as I heard that, the flow of the book all made sense to me. Up until that point, more than half of the book, I was having trouble staying engaged. This makes prefect sense because Jeanette was having similar trouble staying engaged...... in her life.
    Then a major shift happened for her, the memoir became alive just as her life became worth living... fully.
    Taking this journey with this author/narrator was an eye opener for me. Jeanette struggled with love and passion and work and deep depression and rejection and finally redemption but not thank goodness, in the Hollywood way.
    I felt redeemed by listening to this book. Thank you Ms. Jeanette Winterson for not being normal. Best wishes on your journey to find happiness.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lydia Diamond Bar, CA, United States 03-14-12
    Lydia Diamond Bar, CA, United States 03-14-12

    Ever since I was a child, I've been comforted by spoken word and stories . I love Simon Vance's narratives, Anthony Bourdain's humour.

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    "Beam Me Up"

    Jeanette's use of humor is her way of handling often difficult situations with grace and candor. I am enjoying her very interesting although sometimes painful story of growing up "odd" in a time when it was considered...uncool. Her autobiographical story of a an adopted girl who was deprived of books and ended up going to Oxford, brilliantly shining, the shine tarnishing, and somehow developing even now, a new patina. Love her conversational style of writing and bright wit.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rebecca Plainfield, VT, United States 06-10-12
    Rebecca Plainfield, VT, United States 06-10-12 Member Since 2006
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    "Loved this book"

    This book takes time to get into, but once I did (after the first couple of hours) I was gripped. This is a powerful 'story', - her real life story. It is a journey of self discovery which she shares with the reader, she also shares poems, literature, and psychology that she has read, and that have brought insights to her experience. I felt as if I was being 'told' and 'taught' at the same time and came away with many reflections and insights about my own past, as well as hers. Most of all the book left me thinking about how we all have conflicting feelings about our history, and everyones journey is about trying to integrate these. What an amazing story of survival - respect to your Ms Winterson.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Margaret United States 04-24-12
    Margaret United States 04-24-12 Member Since 2010
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    "Not to be missed for Winterson fans or adoptees"

    If you are a fan of literary tour-de-force Jeanette Winterson (like I am), this memoir is not to be missed. Winterson's command of the English language and her literary accomplishments juxtapose sharply against her strong north-of-England, working class accent as she narrates her own story. Adopted by a religious fanatic, her story is a powerful example of personal and psychological self-reliance and triumph over adversity. And as a later middle-aged writer reflecting on her past, she charts a path to sanity and love. As readers we celebrate with her. This witty and wry narrative is superb, and superbly read by Winterson herself. Makes me want to go back and re-read Oranges are not the Only Fruit, the Passion, and Sexing the Cherry.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Danielle Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 03-17-13
    Danielle Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 03-17-13 Member Since 2011
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    "Important"

    Winterson's writing is honest, straightforward, and heartfelt. Her performance is engrossing. This is a beautifully contextualized memoir that is about coming to terms with one's self in every way possible and the transformative power of reading and writing.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J Torrington, CT, United States 02-24-13
    J Torrington, CT, United States 02-24-13
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    "Excellent memoir"

    Excellent memoir. I really enjoyed this author. Very insiteful and thought provoking. This will lead me to read her other books.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Martin A. Perea LA, CA 11-09-12
    Martin A. Perea LA, CA 11-09-12 Member Since 2010
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    "So well-written I had to buy the actual paper book"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? to be better than the print version?

    It's a toss-up. With the book I can better revel in the great prose about Manchester or libraries, while I also enjoyed hearing the author speaking her own words in her own voice about her own life.


    What other book might you compare Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? to and why?

    Memoirs by other writers, coming out stories, growing up in a fundamentalist family stories, self-help stories about overcoming the past.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Especially loved Chapter 2 about the background of Manchester.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Realizations toward the end which I don't want to spoil.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    CHESTER LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 06-19-14
    CHESTER LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 06-19-14 Member Since 2007

    Chet Yarbrough, an audio book addict, exercises two cocker spaniels twice a day with an Ipod in his pocket and earbuds in his ears. Hope these few reviews seduce the public into a similar obsession but walk safely and be aware of the unaware.

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    "BELONGING"

    “Why Be Happy When You Could be Normal?” is an autobiographical story published in 2012 by and about Jeanette Winterson, a famous, and talented English writer. It is about belonging to something greater than one self.

    Unconditional love only exists between pets and humans; not humans and humans. This is not a cosmic exploration of childhood but it is an intimate and insightful look at an adult’s remembrance of childhood.

    Parents do make mistakes with their children but Winterson shows how mistakes can be turned into useful life experiences. The scary part of that usefulness is how much luck is involved in the process.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Evelyn RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA, United States 01-19-13
    Evelyn RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA, United States 01-19-13 Member Since 2012
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    "Retelling, now with more truthiness"
    What did you love best about Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal??

    The story of Winterson's adopted life and finding her birth mother. As the child of an adpotee, it gave me insight into my mother's personality quirks.


    What does Jeanette Winterson bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    I loved listening to Jeanette's accent, she spends a good amount of time talking about where she is from in the UK, and had the narrator had a traditional BBC accent, I think some of the flavor would have been lost.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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