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Commerce & Economy

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Kazuhiko

Kazuhiko TUXEDO PARK, NY, United States Member Since 2012
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  • "Audio format still useful to get th..."

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I agree with the other reviewer who warned that the PDF has 106 pages of figures and tables and that the audio format may not be the best way to "read" this book.

    However, in my case, there is no way for me, who is not an economist or a student, to get through 685 pages (577 pages of main text and figures plus notes, index, etc.) in the hardcover copy just by, uh, reading. While the audiobook's 25 hours is longer than the length of an average audiobook, I got through it in less than 10 days just by listening during my daily commute and chores, and I feel I got the gist of the content. It was interesting enough and, I felt I missed some important aspects of the argument depicted in the figures, so I went out and got a hardcopy and a notebook so that I can even take notes. Yes, this audiobook got me interested in this book.

    An unexpected bonus of this book for me was the author's references to the characters and the financial/societal backdrops of stories by Jane Austen and Honoré de Balzac. I did not realize how much I missed and did not comprehend the important nuances of the stories from the 19th centuries world (or 18th or 20th for that matter). We don't usually pay attention to how culture is influenced by the distribution of capital in the society and how that affects day-to-day mood of people in it.

    I noticed that this book has been greatly politicized. But to me, the book simply provides DATA-DRIVEN analyses and recommendations for a fair society.

    More

    Capital in the Twenty-First Century

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Thomas Piketty, Arthur Goldhammer (translator)
    • Narrated By L. J. Ganser
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (195)
    Performance
    (168)
    Story
    (168)

    What are the grand dynamics that drive the accumulation and distribution of capital? Questions about the long-term evolution of inequality, the concentration of wealth, and the prospects for economic growth lie at the heart of political economy. But satisfactory answers have been hard to find for lack of adequate data and clear guiding theories.

    Kazuhiko says: "Audio format still useful to get the gist of it"
  • "The guys who helped shape the data-..."

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Since the advent of the Internet, it was probably a matter of time that the society became more data-driven. But the two founders of Google, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, definitely pushed this process forward like no other people could. As mentioned in the book, this probably had to do with the fact that both guys happened to be educated in Montessori schools (which encourage students to question the authority and follow one's own quest) earlier in their lives. The book provides a fair assessment of how they evolved as Google became a big company, and yet they tried to retain their original goals. Google tends to be criticized for their invasion of privacies, and I admit that I also always felt nervous about what data they were collecting and how they were using them. But after listening to this book, at least I understand their original intentions and appreciate what they have done to a large extent. I thought the book was a bit too long (nearly 20 hours) - perhaps the author could have delivered the same information with a 2/3 of the length. The narrator was very good.

    More

    In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Steven Levy
    • Narrated By L. J. Ganser
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
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    (2057)
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    (2062)

    Few companies in history have ever been as successful and as admired as Google, the company that has transformed the Internet and become an indispensable part of our lives. How has Google done it? Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy was granted unprecedented access to the company, and in this revelatory book he takes listeners inside Google headquarters - the Googleplex - to explain how Google works.

    Lynn says: "A Rip Snorting Story"
  1. Capital in the Twenty-Fir...
  2. In the Plex: How Google T...
  3. .

A Peek at Ryan's Bookshelf

Helpful
Votes
1326
 
Somerville, MA, United States 260 REVIEWS / 325 ratings Member Since 2005 381 Followers / Following 14
 
Ryan's greatest hits:
  • How Markets Fail: The Logic of Economic Calamities

    "Rational irrationality explained"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    How Markets Fail promotes a view that I think ought to be common sense to Americans, but seems to get lost in today's climate of mindless, media-fueled political hysteria: that free markets, while they provide many benefits that can't be achieved through central planning, will malfunction without rules and external guidance. The 2008 housing crisis and subsequent market collapse was nothing less than a textbook failure of government to step in stop lenders and banks from playing a game that everyone paying attention knew was deeply risky, however profitable the bubble was for players in the short term. And the bailouts that followed were proof that allowing irresponsible pursuit of private gains can lead to socialized losses, the opposite of what free markets are supposed to do.

    How Markets Fail is a book in three parts, each of which is geared towards readers who haven't had more than superficial exposure to the topics discussed -- if you have, you'll probably want to skip ahead. The first part is a condensed history of modern free market economics, introducing readers to influential figures like Adam Smith, Friedrich Hayek, Vilfredo Pareto, Milton Friedman, Robert Lucas, Cecil Pigou, and John Kenyes, then connecting them to present day economists like Alan Greenspan and Paul Krugman. If, like me, you lack formal training in economics, you'll find handy explanations of a few terms and ideas you might have heard bandied about before.

    The second part of the book focuses on where utopian free market ideology breaks down, in light of game theory, behavioral psychology, and other modern, scientific fields of analysis. Cassidy does an admirable job of keeping his arguments balanced, putting forth sober talking points that don't assume villainous motives on the part of any group of people. Rational self-interest, while it often propels trading relationships that work to the mutual benefit of everyone involved, can also lead to behavior that’s destructive to the best interests of a community. Consider, for example, factory owners who know that installing environmentally-friendly machinery is better for everyone, but can't realistically risk committing to this expense if they don't expect that their competitors will. Or health care markets that incentivize insurance providers to jack up premiums for customers who aren't healthy. Or the tendency of large-scale businesses to overcome smaller ones, thus enabling a few elites to dominate markets and pay themselves exorbitant salaries while driving down wages for those beneath them. At least, Cassidy makes a convincing case that different markets have different patterns, and need to be thought about differently, with a reality-based view towards human needs and behavior.

    Part three is an overview of the recent subprime mess, illustrating from a high level the chain of events that led to the meltdown, and the laissez faire policies that enabled them (which Cassidy blames primarily on Alan Greenspan, the one person he really criticizes). I thought this part was well-presented, and did a lot to hammer home the points in part two. Protecting individual foolish home buyers from themselves isn’t the government’s job, but stopping actions that fool a lot of people at once and lead to a national blowout *is* the government’s job.

    Where the book fell a little short for me, though, was in its lack of coherent ideas on how to make government intervention effective. I'm rather skeptical of libertarian views and think it's impossible for governments not to intervene in markets and corporate activities that are global, whether ideology makes them do it sooner or later. However, as we know, Washington DC can be about as agile and precise as King Kong swatting at planes (or not, if they're bringing him gifts of bananas), and people determined to make a profit will always find a way to get around regulations, bend them in ways not intended, or even help write them, fooling the public with benevolent-sounding language while craftily selling out the public's best interests. What criteria should DC use to decide when to give economic matters serious attention and when to push issues it doesn't have the fine-grainedness to handle well back to markets? How do we deal with a world where some corporations have more clout than actual cities, states, or even countries? There aren't easy answers.

    Acknowledging the problem is the first step, though, and I think that How Markets Fail will help many readers do that.

  • Capital in the Twenty-First Century

    "Wall, meet writing"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Spoiler alert: the takeaway from Thomas Piketty's dry but much-discussed book is what most citizens of the developed world already know: income and wealth inequality in first world countries, particularly the United States, are at levels not seen since the Gilded Age. As much as I've personally benefitted from globalism and technology, it’s obvious that the lion’s share of the profits from these trends has gone to a small elite, while many Americans are being left behind in an economy that no longer places great value on their skills (or gives a damn about educating their kids).

    No doubt, the timing of the book’s publication has something to do with the big splash it made -- these are clearly issues on a lot of minds -- but Piketty brings some cool analysis to the current reality, helping the reader understand how to see it in terms of historical data. As he argues, all economic evidence suggests that this disparity is likely to continue to grow, driving modern countries towards a form of society not seen since 19th century Europe. There, he shows, there was less economic growth than in the 20th century, which meant that a small upper class that controlled most of the capital received most of the income, consolidating its dominance through inheritance. Piketty brilliantly illustrates this point with references to classic 19th century novels, wherein protagonists aren’t trying to better themselves in careers in which advancement is limited, but are focused on marrying well. Only the shock of two world wars ended this reality, creating a few decades of growth-through-rebuilding and relatively egalitarian prosperity for Western Europe and the US.

    Piketty dives down into the weeds of numerical data, graphs, charts, and comparison tables to make his point, which doesn’t always make for an ideal audiobook listen. Though there’s a PDF supplement, dedicated readers might want to get the book in print. Still, the gist is clear. We can no longer count on the rapid expansion and population growth that drove the wheels of US industry in earlier days. Return on capital is now a better bet than return on growth in most sectors of a 21st century non-emerging economy, with the start-up costs for high-tech industries or rental properties favoring the already wealthy. Even the apparent exceptions, such as software development (my own field), kind of prove the rule, in the sense that they only provide jobs for a small class of highly-skilled workers, sometimes to the detriment of the less-skilled.

    However, Piketty’s proposed solutions, as much as I agree with their goals, seem naive given current politics. He advocates more confiscatory taxes on the global top 1%, more transparency in the financial systems of all countries, and stronger international laws related to seizing the assets of tax dodgers. I don’t know about his fellow French citizens, but to even suggest to a certain segment of the US electorate that their country might not actually be a meritocracy, or that it be more subject to some international body of law, would trigger instant howling outrage. Never mind that most of that group will never be wealthy themselves -- they would still rather live in a decaying shack, imagining their interests to be aligned with those of the billionaire Koch Brothers, than ever agree with some “socialist” French academic.

    Piketty emphasizes his faith in democracy, but there are a few things I wish he’d discussed more, even if they fall outside the purview of economics. The long-term implications of technological advances on the job market. The tendency of big government and big business to end up in bed with each other. How the people can take back ownership of the political system and the machinery of production without going down the failed route of Communism.

    Still, I’m glad this book is being talked about. If the Boomer Generation is still earnestly clinging to the “American Dream” ideals it once knew, it’s pretty clear to younger generations that the system isn’t so meritocratic or upwardly mobile as it once was. I think that Piketty, a Gen-Xer himself, is speaking more to this demographic than the one currently in charge. After all, to quote a certain Gen-X musical, the aging Koch brothers are “just for now”.

    That said, your kids might give some thought to marrying one of their heirs.

  • The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company

    "Engaging history"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think anyone who's a fan of Pixar's films will enjoy this well-researched, thoroughly readable book. Price begins in the 1970s with the backstories of the company's key members, and proceeds forward, providing an engaging condensed history of computer graphics and animation along the way. We learn about Pixar's early days trying to find its way as a subsidiary of Lucasfilm, and its struggles to stay afloat after being purchased by Steve Jobs. We see its tumultuous history with the cantankerous Apple founder and an increasingly corporate Disney.

    The book's real treat, though, comes when Price discusses the development of the groundbreaking movie Toy Story, a project that underwent many changes from conception to final version, driven by the stubborn commitment of John Lasseter and other leads to get everything right. For example, to find the dynamic between Woody and Buzz, they watched a series of buddy movies and studied the mannerisms of the voice actors. This fanatical attention to detail, combined with top-notch talent and a certain amount of humility on the part of the team when it comes to accepting that some creative ideas must be thrown out in service of quality, demonstrates itself again on subsequent projects. It's nearly as much fun to read about the evolution of Monsters, Inc., Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, and other films. When Pixar's human strengths are mixed with the advantages of the medium, challenged by its constraints, or freed by its newness, the result is a fertile, back-to-the-drawing-board approach that will hopefully continue to generate compelling works and new creative tools for years to come. As a video game developer, I found their process very inspiring to read about.

    As histories of companies go, Price is clearly writing from the position of an admirer. What dirt he dishes up is mostly on Jobs and Disney. But, he knows how to tell the story most readers are after, and it's to his credit that he makes the technological, artistic, and business facets of his narrative interesting, without getting too bogged in the details of any one. I think that any reader interested in film, computer graphics, or simply innovation in general will enjoy it.

  • The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company

    "Engaging history"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think anyone who's a fan of Pixar's films will enjoy this well-researched, thoroughly readable book. Price begins in the 1970s with the backstories of the company's key members, and proceeds forward, providing an engaging condensed history of computer graphics and animation along the way. We learn about Pixar's early days trying to find its way as a subsidiary of Lucasfilm, and its struggles to stay afloat after being purchased by Steve Jobs. We see its tumultuous history with the cantankerous Apple founder and an increasingly corporate Disney.

    The book's real treat, though, comes when Price discusses the development of the groundbreaking movie Toy Story, a project that underwent many changes from conception to final version, driven by the stubborn commitment of John Lasseter and other leads to get everything right. For example, to find the dynamic between Woody and Buzz, they watched a series of buddy movies and studied the mannerisms of the voice actors. This fanatical attention to detail, combined with top-notch talent and a certain amount of humility on the part of the team when it comes to accepting that some creative ideas must be thrown out in service of quality, demonstrates itself again on subsequent projects. It's nearly as much fun to read about the evolution of Monsters, Inc., Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, and other films. When Pixar's human strengths are mixed with the advantages of the medium, challenged by its constraints, or freed by its newness, the result is a fertile, back-to-the-drawing-board approach that will hopefully continue to generate compelling works and new creative tools for years to come. As a video game developer, I found their process very inspiring to read about.

    As histories of companies go, Price is clearly writing from the position of an admirer. What dirt he dishes up is mostly on Jobs and Disney. But, he knows how to tell the story most readers are after, and it's to his credit that he makes the technological, artistic, and business facets of his narrative interesting, without getting too bogged in the details of any one. I think that any reader interested in film, computer graphics, or simply innovation in general will enjoy it.

Tim

Tim United States 10-30-12 Member Since 2010

Not a mainstream reader.

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  • "Mac Aficionado (and a request to Au..."

    3 of 4 helpful votes

    Any Mac aficionado will love this book. I am very aware of Steven Levy's writing. He is one of the best technology chronologist of our time. Even though I am not a Mac User, I really enjoyed listening about how Apple got started. There is a secret hidden gem about Apple and their stories.

    This company is like a blockbuster movie, lights, action, and drama. There is no other tech company out there like Apple that keep their consumers wanting more. I don't see multiple books about Intel, but there is always an new plot on Apple.

    I really wish that Audible will record more books from Steven Levy, like "Hackers." Please record this book. We are missing out one of the best tech titles in audio. I would pay 2 credits for Hackers without a doubt!

    More

    Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer that Changed Everything

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Steven Levy
    • Narrated By Steven Levy
    Overall
    (34)
    Performance
    (28)
    Story
    (28)

    The creation of the Mac, in 1984, catapulted America into the digital millennium, captured a fanatic cult audience, and transformed the computer industry into an unprecedented mix of technology, economics, and show business. Veteran technology writer and Newsweek senior editor Steven Levy zooms in on the great machine and the fortunes of the unique company responsible for its evolution. Loaded with anecdote and insight, and peppered with sharp commentary, Insanely Great is the definitive book on the most important computer ever made. It is a must-have for anyone curious about how we got to the interactive age.

    Jeffrey says: "Insanely? Maybe."

What's Trending in Commerce & Economy:

  • 4.5 (4270 ratings)
    The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine (






UNABRIDGED) by Michael Lewis Narrated by Jesse Boggs

    The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine

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    • By Michael Lewis
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    Who understood the risk inherent in the assumption of ever-rising real-estate prices, a risk compounded daily by the creation of those arcane, artificial securities loosely based on piles of doubtful mortgages? Michael Lewis turns the inquiry on its head to create a fresh, character-driven narrative brimming with indignation and dark humor, a fitting sequel to his number-one best-selling Liar’s Poker.

    Jay says: "Informative and Engaging"
  • 4.3 (579 ratings)
    When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management (






UNABRIDGED) by Roger Lowenstein Narrated by Roger Lowenstein

    When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management

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    • By Roger Lowenstein
    • Narrated By Roger Lowenstein
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    When Genius Failed is the cautionary financial tale of our time, the gripping saga of what happened when an elite group of investors believed they could actually deconstruct risk and use virtually limitless leverage to create limitless wealth. In Roger Lowenstein's hands, it is a brilliant tale peppered with fast money, vivid characters, and high drama.

    Pankaj says: "Informative and interesting, full of suspense"
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    Basic Economics, Fourth Edition: A Common Sense Guide to the Economy (






UNABRIDGED) by Thomas Sowell Narrated by Tom Weiner

    Basic Economics, Fourth Edition: A Common Sense Guide to the Economy

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    • By Thomas Sowell
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    Overall
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    Performance
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    The fourth edition of Basic Economics is both expanded and updated. A new chapter on the history of economics itself has been added, and the implications of that history examined. Among other additions throughout the book, a new section on the special role of corporations in the economy has been added to the chapter on government and big business.

    kevin says: "Myth Buster"
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    Start-Up Nation: The Story of Israel's Economic Miracle (






UNABRIDGED) by Dan Senor, Saul Singer Narrated by Sean Pratt

    Start-Up Nation: The Story of Israel's Economic Miracle

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Dan Senor, Saul Singer
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    Performance
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    Start-Up Nation addresses the trillion dollar question: How is it that Israel - a country of 7.1 million, only 60 years old, surrounded by enemies, in a constant state of war since its founding, with no natural resources - produces more start-up companies than large, peaceful, and stable nations like Japan, China, India, Korea, Canada, and the UK?

    morton says: "A Remarkable Audio!"
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    How Markets Fail: The Logic of Economic Calamities (






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    • By John Cassidy
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    Performance
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    Behind the alarming headlines about job losses, bank bailouts, and corporate greed, there is a little-known story of bad ideas. For 50 years or more, economists have been busy developing elegant theories of how markets work - how they facilitate innovation, wealth creation, and an efficient allocation of society's resources. But what about when markets don't work?

    Ben says: "Way more than I expected"
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    The Housing Boom and Bust (






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    There was no single, dramatic event that set the current financial crisis off. A whole series of very questionable decisions by many people, in many places, over a period of years, built up the pressures that led to a sudden collapse of the housing market and of financial institutions that began to fall like dominoes as a result of investing in securities based on housing prices. This book is designed to unravel the tangled threads of that story.

    Adolphe says: "Inciteful Non partisan blame"
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    • By Shawn King
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    Story
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    Your Mac Life, hosted by Shawn King, is one of the most popular Mac broadcasts in the world. Download and listen to this weekly, Web-based "radio show" about and for Apple and Mac users. Stay on top of the what's new in the world of Macs, listen to interviews with Mac-related newsmakers, and pick up technical tips to help you make the most of your Mac.

    James says: "Fun to listen, and sometimes I learn stuff"
  • Capital in the Twenty-First Century (






UNABRIDGED) by Thomas Piketty, Arthur Goldhammer (translator) Narrated by L. J. Ganser

    Capital in the Twenty-First Century

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Thomas Piketty, Arthur Goldhammer (translator)
    • Narrated By L. J. Ganser
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (195)
    Performance
    (168)
    Story
    (168)

    What are the grand dynamics that drive the accumulation and distribution of capital? Questions about the long-term evolution of inequality, the concentration of wealth, and the prospects for economic growth lie at the heart of political economy. But satisfactory answers have been hard to find for lack of adequate data and clear guiding theories.

    Kazuhiko says: "Audio format still useful to get the gist of it"
  • Economics: Making sense of the Modern Economy: The Economist (






UNABRIDGED) by Saguao Datta (editor) Narrated by David Thorpe

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    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By Saguao Datta (editor)
    • Narrated By David Thorpe
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    Performance
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    (13)

    A radically revised new edition of this highly readable, popular guide aimed at everyone from students to statesmen who want to make sense of the modern economy and grasp how economic theory works in practice. It starts with the basics, and from the underlying theory it moves to the specifics of the world economy, including an analysis of the recent recession. The closing part puts the usefulness and the failings of economics under the spotlight, and looks at the innovative approaches being developed to address these failings.

    Mark York says: "A smorgasbord of old Economist articles."
  • Made to Stick (






UNABRIDGED) by Chip Heath, Dan Heath Narrated by Charles Kahlenberg

    Made to Stick

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Chip Heath, Dan Heath
    • Narrated By Charles Kahlenberg
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2098)
    Performance
    (667)
    Story
    (670)

    Mark Twain once observed, "A lie can get halfway around the world before the truth can even get its boots on." His observation rings true: urban legends, conspiracy theories, and bogus public-health scares circulate effortlessly. Meanwhile, people with important ideas (business people, teachers, politicians, journalists, and others) struggle to make their ideas "stick". In this indispensable guide, we discover that sticky messages of all kinds draw their power from the same six traits.

    Jeremy says: "Even Better The Second Time"
  • The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine (






UNABRIDGED) by Michael Lewis Narrated by Jesse Boggs

    The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Michael Lewis
    • Narrated By Jesse Boggs
    Overall
    (4270)
    Performance
    (1752)
    Story
    (1773)

    Who understood the risk inherent in the assumption of ever-rising real-estate prices, a risk compounded daily by the creation of those arcane, artificial securities loosely based on piles of doubtful mortgages? Michael Lewis turns the inquiry on its head to create a fresh, character-driven narrative brimming with indignation and dark humor, a fitting sequel to his number-one best-selling Liar’s Poker.

    Jay says: "Informative and Engaging"
  •  
  • The Death of Money: The Coming Collapse of the International Monetary System (






UNABRIDGED) by James Rickards Narrated by Sean Pratt

    The Death of Money: The Coming Collapse of the International Monetary System

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By James Rickards
    • Narrated By Sean Pratt
    Overall
    (104)
    Performance
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    Story
    (89)

    The international monetary system has collapsed three times in the past hundred years, in 1914, 1939, and 1971. Each collapse was followed by a period of tumult: War, civil unrest, or significant damage to the stability of the global economy. Now James Rickards, the acclaimed author of Currency Wars, shows why another collapse is rapidly approaching - and why this time, nothing less than the institution of money itself is at risk.

    Jean says: "A good review of the global financial system"
  • Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local - and Helped Save an American Town (






UNABRIDGED) by Beth Macy Narrated by Kristin Kalbli

    Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local - and Helped Save an American Town

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Beth Macy
    • Narrated By Kristin Kalbli
    Overall
    (5)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (5)

    With over $500 million a year in sales, the Bassett Furniture Company was once the world's biggest wood furniture manufacturer. But beginning in the 1980s, the Bassett company suffered from an influx of cheap Chinese furniture as the first waves of Asian competition hit, and ultimately was forced to send its production offshore to Asia. Only one man fought back. That man is John Bassett III, a descendant of the Bassetts who is now chairman of Vaughan-Bassett Furniture Co, which employs more than 700 Virginians and has sales of over $90 million.

    Mr. 73 says: "Off shoring does't start till book is half over"
  • The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve (






UNABRIDGED) by G. Edward Griffin Narrated by Mark Bramhall

    The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By G. Edward Griffin
    • Narrated By Mark Bramhall
    Overall
    (147)
    Performance
    (136)
    Story
    (136)

    This classic expose of the Fed has become one of the best-selling books in its category of all time. Where does money come from? Where does it go? Who makes it? The money magician's secrets are unveiled. Here is a close look at their mirrors and smoke machines, the pulleys, cogs, and wheels that create the grand illusion called money. A boring subject? Just wait. You'll be hooked in five minutes. It reads like a detective story - which it really is, but it's all true.

    Charyn says: "Prepare to be amazed"
  • The New York Times Audio Digest, 1-Month Subscription

    The New York Times Audio Digest, 1-Month Subscription

    • NONE (45 mins)
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    Story
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    It's the perfect listen for your morning commute! In the time it takes you to get to work, you'll hear a digest of the day's top stories, prepared by the editorial staff of The New York Times. Each edition includes articles from the front page, as well as the paper's international, national, business, sports, and editorial sections.

    George says: "It's Great!"
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  • In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives (






UNABRIDGED) by Steven Levy Narrated by L. J. Ganser

    In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Steven Levy
    • Narrated By L. J. Ganser
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2867)
    Performance
    (2057)
    Story
    (2062)

    Few companies in history have ever been as successful and as admired as Google, the company that has transformed the Internet and become an indispensable part of our lives. How has Google done it? Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy was granted unprecedented access to the company, and in this revelatory book he takes listeners inside Google headquarters - the Googleplex - to explain how Google works.

    Lynn says: "A Rip Snorting Story"
  • Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World (






UNABRIDGED) by Michael Hyatt Narrated by Michael Hyatt

    Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Michael Hyatt
    • Narrated By Michael Hyatt
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (165)
    Performance
    (148)
    Story
    (148)

    To be successful in the market today, you must possess two strategic assets: a compelling product and a meaningful platform. In this step-by-step guide, Michael Hyatt, former CEO and current Chairman of Thomas Nelson Publishers, takes readers behind the scenes, into the new world of social media success. He shows you what best-selling authors, public speakers, entrepreneurs, musicians, and other creative minds are doing differently to win customers in today’s crowded marketplace.

    Abraham says: "Lots of Quality Info, Not-So-Great Voice Over"
  • All the Presidents' Bankers: The Hidden Alliances That Drive American Power (






UNABRIDGED) by Nomi Prins Narrated by Marguerite Gavin

    All the Presidents' Bankers: The Hidden Alliances That Drive American Power

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Nomi Prins
    • Narrated By Marguerite Gavin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (7)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (7)

    Nomi Prins ushers us into the intimate world of exclusive clubs, vacation spots, and Ivy League universities that binds presidents and financiers. She unravels the multi-generational blood, intermarriage, and protégé relationships that have confined national influence to a privileged cluster of people. This unprecedented history of American power illuminates how financiers have retained their authoritative position through history, swaying presidents regardless of party affiliation.

    PHIL says: "Good big-picture view, not spoiled by the biases"
  • Basic Economics, Fourth Edition: A Common Sense Guide to the Economy (






UNABRIDGED) by Thomas Sowell Narrated by Tom Weiner

    Basic Economics, Fourth Edition: A Common Sense Guide to the Economy

    • UNABRIDGED (23 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Thomas Sowell
    • Narrated By Tom Weiner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (544)
    Performance
    (385)
    Story
    (381)

    The fourth edition of Basic Economics is both expanded and updated. A new chapter on the history of economics itself has been added, and the implications of that history examined. Among other additions throughout the book, a new section on the special role of corporations in the economy has been added to the chapter on government and big business.

    kevin says: "Myth Buster"
  • When Rice Shakes the World: The Importance of the First Grain to World Economic & Political Stability (






UNABRIDGED) by Milo Hamilton Narrated by Milo Hamilton

    When Rice Shakes the World: The Importance of the First Grain to World Economic & Political Stability

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Milo Hamilton
    • Narrated By Milo Hamilton
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Today the food and agricultural markets of India and China are in motion. The history of agricultural change is littered with hunger, poverty, and failure. Will that curse pass itself on to this Asian generation? Or is there a brighter future ahead of us? Now China is rapidly becoming the wealthiest country in the world. China's water shortages and its rice market are fault lines that finger their way beneath the surface of the world economy.

  • Marketplace Weekend, July 25, 2014  by Lizzie O'Leary Narrated by Lizzie O'Leary

    Marketplace Weekend, July 25, 2014

    • ORIGINAL (51 mins)
    • By Lizzie O'Leary
    • Narrated By Lizzie O'Leary
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    On American Public Media’s Marketplace Weekend™ host Lizzie O’Leary guides listeners through the most fascinating economic stories of the week, exploring what happened, why it matters, who it affects and what happens next.

  • Marketplace Weekend, July 18, 2014  by Lizzie O'Leary Narrated by Lizzie O'Leary

    Marketplace Weekend, July 18, 2014

    • ORIGINAL (50 mins)
    • By Lizzie O'Leary
    • Narrated By Lizzie O'Leary
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    On American Public Media’s Marketplace Weekend™ host Lizzie O’Leary guides listeners through the most fascinating economic stories of the week, exploring what happened, why it matters, who it affects and what happens next.

  • Examples of Globalization: An Excursion to the Dark Side of Our New World Order (






UNABRIDGED) by Gary Anderson Narrated by Kenneth Lee

    Examples of Globalization: An Excursion to the Dark Side of Our New World Order

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Gary Anderson
    • Narrated By Kenneth Lee
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    The dark side of globalization threatens us all. This audiobook is a compilation of my writings, showing the many ways we are threatened as a sovereign nation, and how we must resist and protect ourselves and our families. There are new insights in this audiobook as well. Citizens of the United States are victims of a slow motion coup starting with the establishment of our central bank and the assassination of a beloved president, John F. Kennedy.

  •  
  • CEO Guide to Doing Business in Asia: Thailand, Vietnam, and Philippines (






UNABRIDGED) by Ade Asefeso, MCIPS MBA Narrated by Ayn Czubas

    CEO Guide to Doing Business in Asia: Thailand, Vietnam, and Philippines

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Ade Asefeso, MCIPS MBA
    • Narrated By Ayn Czubas
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Are you a CEO, consultant, or entrepreneur interested in entering or expanding your activity in Thailand, Vietnam, and Philippines' market? Then this audiobook is for you! The main objective of this audiobook is to provide you with basic knowledge about Thailand, Vietnam, and Philippines; an overview of their economy, business culture, potential opportunities, and an introduction to other relevant issues. Novice exporters, in particular, will find it a useful starting point.

  • Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local - and Helped Save an American Town (






UNABRIDGED) by Beth Macy Narrated by Kristin Kalbli

    Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local - and Helped Save an American Town

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Beth Macy
    • Narrated By Kristin Kalbli
    Overall
    (5)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (5)

    With over $500 million a year in sales, the Bassett Furniture Company was once the world's biggest wood furniture manufacturer. But beginning in the 1980s, the Bassett company suffered from an influx of cheap Chinese furniture as the first waves of Asian competition hit, and ultimately was forced to send its production offshore to Asia. Only one man fought back. That man is John Bassett III, a descendant of the Bassetts who is now chairman of Vaughan-Bassett Furniture Co, which employs more than 700 Virginians and has sales of over $90 million.

    Mr. 73 says: "Off shoring does't start till book is half over"
  • Location is (Still) Everything: The Surprising Influence of the Real World on How We Search, Shop, and Sell in the Virtual One (






UNABRIDGED) by David R. Bell Narrated by Tom Parks

    Location is (Still) Everything: The Surprising Influence of the Real World on How We Search, Shop, and Sell in the Virtual One

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By David R. Bell
    • Narrated By Tom Parks
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Anyone can go online and buy a pair of pants - but the likelihood that we would do so depends to a significant degree on where we live. The presence of stores nearby, trendy and friendly neighbors, and local sales taxes play a large role in the decision-making process when it comes to buying online. Location Is (Still) Everything is for anyone who wants to understand the patterns underlying how and why we use the Internet to shop, sell, and search, including entrepreneurs, students, and investors.