Showing results by narrator "Macat"

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    • A Macat Analysis of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex

    • By: Rachele Dini
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 21
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 16
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 17

    De Beauvoir's book charted the oppression of "the second sex" in terms never before seen in the academic world. Her most startling theory became a rallying cry for the feminist movement: "One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman." She argued that gender identity was shaped by upbringing in a world ruled by men. A leading light in the existentialist movement, de Beauvoir applied the radical philosophy of personal choice and freedom to argue that women were subjugated in every area of life.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • 70's Movement, The Burning of the Bra

    • By Amazon Customer on 12-07-18

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Émile Durkheim's On Suicide

    • By: Robert Easthope
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 5

    Sociologist Émile Durkheim's 1897 work On Suicide is a powerful evidence-based study of why people take their own lives. In the late 19th century it was generally accepted that each suicide was an individual phenomenon, caused by such personal factors as grief, loss, and financial problems. But Durkheim felt there were patterns in suicide rates, and believed that a more likely cause of suicide lay in the individual's relationship to society.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice

    • By: Filippo Diongi, Jeremy Kleidosty
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 25
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 21
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 20

    Issues of human rights and freedoms always inflame passions, and John Rawls's A Theory of Justice will do the same. Published in 1971, it links the idea of social justice to a basic sense of fairness that recognizes human rights and freedoms. Controversially, though, it also accepts differences in the distribution of goods and services - as long as they benefit the worst off in society.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Good Overview and Context

    • By TCope on 04-11-18

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Eric Hoffer's The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements

    • By: Jonah S. Rubin
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 40 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 31
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 26
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 26

    A self-educated man, Eric Hoffer was most likely born in 1898. He wrote in his spare time after doing shifts on the San Francisco docks, where he continued to work, even after becoming a successful author. Hoffer began writing The True Believer in the 1940s, as Nazism and fascism spread across Europe. Most analysts who were trying to work out how these movements became so powerful focused on their leaders and the ideas they trumpeted.

    • 2 out of 5 stars
    • Hoffer not analyzed

    • By Lawrence A. on 09-20-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Michael E. Porter's Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors

    • By: Pádraig Belton
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 2 hrs and 19 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 11

    Published in 1980, Michael E. Porter's Competitive Strategy went against the accepted wisdom of the time that said firms should focus on expanding their market share. Porter claimed they should, in fact, analyze the five forces that mold the environment in which they compete: new entrants, substitute products, buyers, suppliers, and industry rivals. Then they could rationally choose one of three "generic strategies" - lowering cost, differentiating their product, or catering to a niche market.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth

    • By: Riley Quinn
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 25
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 18
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19

    Published in 1961, the year of Frantz Fanon's death, The Wretched of the Earth is both a powerful analysis of the psychological effects of colonization and a rallying cry for violent uprising and independence. The book rejects colonial assumptions that the people of colonized countries need to be guided by their European colonizers because they are somehow less evolved or civilized. Fanon argues that violence is justified to purge colonialism not just from the countries themselves, but from the very souls of their inhabitants.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Take THAT Amazon's Suggestion Engine!

    • By Dan Collins on 12-17-16

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of David Graeber's Debt: The First 5,000 Years

    • By: Sulaiman Hakemy
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    David Graeber's 2011 book, Debt: The First 5,000 Years, seeks to overturn hundreds of years of economic theory, specifically the idea that people have a natural inclination to trade with each other and that the concept of money developed spontaneously to overcome the inefficiencies of a bartering system. The US-born social activist uses his training as an anthropologist to trace the histories of money and of debt and reaches the conclusion that money was in fact created by the state as a means of exploiting the poor.

    • 3 out of 5 stars
    • Why repeat chapter name twice?

    • By Marcin on 12-20-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks

    • By: Lorenzo Fusaro, Jason Xidias
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11

    First published in 1948, Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks is an important Marxist work that says we must understand societies both in terms of their economic relationships and their cultural beliefs. Gramsci wanted to explore why Russia had undergone a socialist revolution in 1917 while other European countries had not. So he developed the concept of hegemony, which is the idea that those who hold power in a society can maintain and use that power because of their own grip on cultural values and economic relationships.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • Redundant & uninformative

    • By Chels Alexandra on 12-28-18

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Homi K. Bhabha's The Location of Culture

    • By: The Macat Team
    • Narrated by: The Macat Team
    • Length: 1 hr and 56 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    Bhabha investigates concepts such as "hybridity," the notion that ideas are made up of all the different cultures with which they have contact, and "mimicry," the way in which a person or group adopts an idea from another culture, to express a postcolonial world, where we are all "in between" cultures. These concepts have been important to postcolonial studies, but have also been taken up in such diverse areas as architecture and literature. Although criticized by some for insisting that the written word was as powerful as armed resistance in the struggle against colonizing forces.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason

    • By: Michael O'Sullivan
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 10
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7

    More than two centuries after its initial publication in 1781, Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason remains perhaps the most influential text in modern philosophy. Kant himself claimed his work as a revolutionary document and insisted that it changed the discipline of philosophy as thoroughly as Copernicus had changed astronomy 300 years earlier, when he said the Earth revolved around the sun and not the other way round.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities

    • By: Jason Xidias
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 2 hrs and 8 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 4

    Some people think nationhood is as old as civilization itself. But for anthropologist, historian, and political scientist Benedict Anderson, nation and nationalism are products of the communication technology of the era known as the modern age, which began in 1500. After the invention of the printing press around 1440, common local languages gradually replaced Latin as the language of print. Ordinary people could now share ideas of their own.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue

    • By: Jon W. Thompson
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 49 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 19
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 16
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 15

    This is a book for anyone who wants to understand exactly what we mean by ethics and morality today. One of the most vital and controversial works in the 20th-century world of moral philosophy, Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue examines how we think about, talk about, and act out our moral views in the modern world. Finding that the ways in which we engage in our moral reasoning have no common standard of judgment, MacIntyre's 1981 book challenges many contemporary theories of morals.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • great analysis very helpful

    • By Lylianp on 10-13-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Frantz Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks

    • By: Rachele Dini
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 9

    Frantz Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks offers a radical analysis of the psychological effects of colonization on the colonized. Born in 1925 on the island of Martinique - at the time a French colony - Fanon witnessed firsthand the abuses of white colonizers and the system's effects on his country. His revulsion was only confirmed later in life when he worked as a psychiatrist in Algeria, another French colony. Fanon's work played a pivotal role in the civil rights movements of the 1960s and was later taken up by scholars of postcolonialist studies.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • Don't waste money on this!

    • By joshua eli scuteri on 02-07-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Toni Morrison's Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination

    • By: Karina Jakubowicz, Adam Perchard
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      2.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      2.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      2.5 out of 5 stars 3

    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction - and the first black woman to win the Nobel Prize in literature - novelist, orator, and outspoken public intellectual Toni Morrison is best known for her novels. In Playing in the Dark, however, she enters the realm of literary criticism. Morrison, an African American, draws attention to the often-overlooked significance of race in literature, demonstrating "the impact of racism on those who perpetuate it". Reading the racial language between the lines of classic American fiction, Morrison shows that literature is never raceless.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Thank you

    • By LaKeisha Williams-Purcell on 04-27-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations

    • By: Michael O'Sullivan
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 12
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 8

    In Philosophical Investigations, the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein presents a radical approach to problems in the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind. In fact, he sets out a radically new conception of philosophy itself. Published in 1953, two years after Wittgenstein's death, many still consider it one of the finest works of 20th century philosophy.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • Disappointing

    • By Elizabeth on 10-07-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's Can the Subaltern Speak?

    • By: Graham K. Riach
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 2 hrs and 11 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 14
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 11

    Can the Subaltern Speak? is a classic of postcolonial studies, the discipline that examines the impact of colonial control on countries that gained their independence from European powers from the 1940s onwards. The essay, written in 1988 by Calcutta-born scholar Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, argues that a core problem for the poorest and most marginalized in society (the subalterns) is that they have no platform to express their concerns, and no voice to affect policy debates or demand a fairer share.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Stellar Analysis

    • By Amazon Customer on 12-17-18

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Thomas Paine's The Rights of Man

    • By: Mariana Assis, Jason Xidias
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    British-born American political activist Thomas Paine wrote Rights of Man in 1791 in response to Reflections on the Revolution in France, Edmund Burke's attack on the French Revolution. Burke was wary of tearing down old institutions of government. But Paine argued that revolution is acceptable - in fact, necessary - when government ignores the rights of its people. Not surprisingly, Rights of Man proved very popular in the newly liberated United States, selling over 100,000 copies.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • A Clear Abstract On Works Of Thomas Paine

    • By William E. Hendry on 10-23-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of C. L. R. James's The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution

    • By: Nick Broten
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 5

    Published in 1938, Cyril Lionel Robert (C. L. R.) James' The Black Jacobins is the little-known story of the only successful slave revolution known in history. It was this 12-year struggle of the African slaves in the French colony of San Domingo that led to the establishment of the Republic of Haiti in 1804. The uprising was inspired by the ideals of the French Revolution that had begun in 1789, just two years before, and in this work James goes to great lengths to show the relationship between the two upheavals.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Hannah Arendt's 'The Human Condition'

    • By: Sahar Aurore Saeidnia, Anthony Lang
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 39 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 9

    In her 1958 work, political theorist Hannah Arendt asks two fundamental questions: "Under what conditions do politics emerge?" and "Under what conditions can politics be eliminated?" In searching for answers she turns some long-established thinking on its head. Ancient political philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle believed that a life spent thinking was more important than an active life of labor, work, and action. But Arendt argues that political action is every bit as important as political thinking.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Douglas McGregor's The Human Side of Enterprise

    • By: Stoyan Stoyanov, Monique Diderich
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 7

    Traditionally, managers assumed people were lazy and would not work unless strictly controlled. McGregor, however, believed this form of management to be based on faulty assumptions about human nature, and felt that managers should reflect on their assumptions about what motivates people. He proposed they draw on research in psychology and the other social sciences to create working conditions that allow all employees to realize their full human potential.

    Regular price: $6.95

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