Showing results by author "Edward Lucie-Smith"

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    • Goya: Between Two Worlds

    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Teague Dean
    • Length: 32 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 4
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    A study of a later period album of drawings on the theme of old women and nightmares by Francisco Goya exhibited at the Courtauld Gallery London, with reference to his supernatural "Black Paintings".

    Regular price: $3.95

    • The Private John Singer Sargent

    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: David Micklem
    • Length: 25 mins
    • Unabridged
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    An essay by Edward Lucie-Smith explores aspects of the mysterious and private character of the renowned American society artist John Singer Sargent.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • A wonderful voice reads a fascinating bio

    • By Amazon Customer on 07-01-18

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Disobedient Objects

    • Studies in World Art, Book 118
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Paul Bright
    • Length: 12 mins
    • Unabridged
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    It is understandable that, in current circumstances, major arts institutions should try to ally themselves with the more anarchic, contrarian elements in contemporary culture. Perhaps this is especially true of those dealing with the contemporary visual arts, committed as these still are to the myth of avant-gardism. One problem that immediately presents itself, of course, is that this myth is not itself contemporary - it is rooted in the very earliest years of the century before ours.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Pollock/Picasso: The European Vanguard Versus American Modernism

    • Studies in World Art, Book 112
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Paul Jenkins
    • Length: 40 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 2
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    This audiobook considers the magnetic poles of post-war modernism and the towering figures of Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock. The essay considers the history of French avant-garde art led by Picasso to the post-war years and the increasing dominance of American artists foregrounded by the advent of Abstract Expressionism in the 1950s.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Loved the narrator!

    • By Valerie on 09-10-18

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Magical Thinking: Why the Avant-Garde Is Now History

    • Studies in World Art, Book 140
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Jack Wynters
    • Length: 1 hr and 28 mins
    • Unabridged
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    The word avant-garde, so much used in connection with the various manifestations of contemporary art, is starting to have a strange, ironic ring to it. One might even claim that it is starting to signify what is behind the times, rather than in front of them. Like all such terms, it is in fact a metaphor, rather than a direct description. Borrowed from old-fashioned military terminology, it seeks to describe a situation where social norms are being perpetually challenged by artists. In the military sphere, where it originated, it is long out of use.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Ted Hughes: A Modern Wordsworth? A Modern Byron?

    • Studies in World Art, Book 138
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Tim Carper
    • Length: 17 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Of all the British poets of my generation, Ted Hughes, now nearly 20 years dead, left behind him both the grandest and most sulfurous reputation. The controversies he aroused rumble on, and the hurts, in certain quarters, are still keenly felt. Any life story that comprises not just two but actually three suicides, plus a murder, does wrap a cloak of darkness about itself.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Art, Poetry and WW1

    • Cv/Visual Arts Research, Book 191
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: David Micklem
    • Length: 36 mins
    • Unabridged
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    In this study, Art, Poetry, and WW1 by Edward Lucie-Smith of writing, poetry, and painting in the centenary year of the outbreak of the First World War, the author considers the historical impact on the general psyche of the calamitous events, reflected in the expression of poets and visual artists. He establishes a continuity to the theme with reference to works by Velázquez, Watteau, Goya, and others, in their treatment of the spectacle of battle and the horrors of war and human conflict.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Ai Weiwei: And the Evolution of Political Art

    • Studies in World Art, Book 90
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Anthony Howard
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    Ben Luke, resident art critic of the London Evening Standard, calls Ai Weiwei "probably the most famous artist in the world. He has transcended the world of museums and galleries, and exerts a newsworthiness that no other artist competes with." This statement, if one bothers to look through the kind of publicity that Ai now attracts - thanks to the digital revolution most of this is easily available with a few clicks on one’s computer - is self-evidently true.  

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Figurative Painting: Confronting the Crisis

    • Studies in World Art, Book 119
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Joe Van Riper
    • Length: 22 mins
    • Unabridged
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    This exhibition, based on a single, very personal and - dare one say it? - extremely distinguished private collection, tackles a large subject within a relatively small compass. It aims to examine a now universally recognized crisis, which is what is happening to painting as an art form. Quite a large number of critics and curators have, in recent years, proclaimed that painting is dead: that attention must now be paid to other kinds of art.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Joseph Beuys

    • Studies in World Art, Book 42
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Ian Kingsley
    • Length: 12 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Many people - among them, most art-world insiders - think that Joseph Beuys was the most important artist of the second half of the 20th century. Beuys was many things - a shaman, a trickster, a charismatic social and political activist. He spearheaded the return to prominence of the German avant-garde post-World War II, and his impact on both the European and American art worlds continues to be felt today, nearly 20 years after his death in January 1986.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Aspects of Jasper Johns

    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith, Nicholas James
    • Narrated by: Eric Elliott
    • Length: 25 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 2
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      3 out of 5 stars 1
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      3 out of 5 stars 1

    An introductory essay by Edward Lucie-Smith, "The Enigma of Jasper Johns", explores the art, analysing its development from the 1950s to the exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts, London.

    • 3 out of 5 stars
    • I'm sure it's better in person

    • By Valerie on 09-10-18

    Regular price: $3.95

    • The Dance of Death

    • CV/Visual Arts Research, Book 179
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Barry Shannon
    • Length: 45 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Edward Lucie-Smith examines Hans Holbein's famous series of prints, The Dance of Death, together with associated works, such as various artistic variations on the theme of Death and the Maiden. In addition, Lucie-Smith looks at some famous images made on the theme of war, notably the prints of Jacques Callot and the bitter social studies of Goya y Lucientes.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Rothko at the Tate

    • Studies in World Art, Book 68
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Joe Van Riper
    • Length: 6 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Rothko is now one of those mythical artists, an icon of 20th century creativity, the central figure in a tragic legend. Which means to say that one is pretty much compelled to agree that everything he did was wonderful, a manifestation of genius. I have to say that I find myself increasingly resistant to this approach. Some works by Rothko I do in fact respond to, with their glowing blocks of color.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Georgia O'Keeffe: A 20th Century Populist

    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Mark Ballinger
    • Length: 12 mins
    • Unabridged
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    Georgia O’Keeffe is a slightly odd case in the story of American art. She became famous very early, thanks to the efforts of her patron, lover, and eventual husband Alfred Stieglitz. Having been a leading figure in the New York art world, she eventually withdrew from that to become the central presence in a new kind of regionalism, focused not on the Midwest but New Mexico and, in particular, on the art scene in and around Santa Fe.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Making Art History

    • Cv/Visual Arts Research, Book 168
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Rick Paradis
    • Length: 36 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Art dealing today in the United States is a huge, well-organized, well-publicized industry. Probably, there has never previously been a market in art that has played such an important role in a national economy. The United States retains the preeminent position in the world market for art that it achieved immediately after World War II and seems unlikely to lose it any time soon. In addition to serving collectors and institutions based in America, the American dealing community supplies works of art to individuals and museums all over the world.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Photography Loses Its Limits

    • Studies in World Art, Book 131
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Don Wang
    • Length: 16 mins
    • Unabridged
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    London is now a major centre for the international art world. The only other European city that houses as many studios is not Paris but Berlin. And Berlin does not have nearly as many galleries, public or commercial, which feature the latest developments in contemporary art. 

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Paris and Beyond

    • Studies in World Art, Book 60
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Joe Van Riper
    • Length: 9 mins
    • Unabridged
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    In the early years of the 20th century, Paris became the center for an international community of artists. Some of them were French, but the city also offered its hospitality to artists from an increasingly wide range of other nationalities. Some, like Marc Chagall, came from communities that had never produced artists of international note before. The result was a mixture between a stewpot and a laboratory.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Frida Kahlo

    • Studies in World Art, Book 29
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Willis Miller
    • Length: 7 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    Going to the Frida Kahlo exhibition current at Tate Modern in London is like entering the shrine of a secular saint. The rooms are thronged. People peer closely at the paintings, many of them very small. They seem afraid to talk much above a whisper. There are a number of reasons for this reaction. One is Hayden Herrera’s highly readable biography of the artist, first published in 1983, and now established as a classic feminist text. Another is the feminist movement’s general need for heroines, which has had a similar effect on the posthumous reputation of Georgia O’Keeffe. A third, probably the most powerful, reason is Kahlo’s own personality, which combined self-assertion, defiance and masochism in almost equal proportions. In this respect Kahlo can be compared with a slightly later generation of English-language poets, male and female. Prominent among them are Robert Lowell, John Berryman, Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Giacometti and Frank Auerbach

    • Portraiture and the Pursuit of the Absolute (CV/Visual Arts Research)
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Anthony Fanna
    • Length: 20 mins
    • Unabridged
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    A study of Giacometti portraits at the National Portrait Gallery London and Frank Auerbach at Tate Britain.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Appropriation - What's Appropriation?

    • Studies in World Art, Book 110
    • By: Edward Lucie-Smith
    • Narrated by: Bob Barton
    • Length: 12 mins
    • Unabridged
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    As a number of recent exhibitions have shown, there is a growing fashion for what is called appropriation in art. To you and me, what this means is slavish copying - no ifs and buts, apologies replaced by the paradoxical assertion that this is a thoroughly original, impeccably avant-garde thing to do. Examples were a recent show at the Saatchi Gallery, entitled "Post Pop: East Meets West"; and "Sturtevant: Double Trouble", on view till late February at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

    Regular price: $3.95

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