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    • Scientific American, January 2006

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Scientific American
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 17
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This month, we'll hear about inexpensive gene-readers that will soon unlock the secrets in your personal double helix, motherhood's effect on the female brain, a look back at the deadly tsunami of 2004, and the benefits of not testing new chemicals on animals.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Audible Technology Review, February 2010

    • By: Technology Review
    • Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue, you'll hear how wireless carriers are working hard to improve the network - so they can meet the demanding needs of their growing customer base. You'll learn about the Que [Q], Plastic Logics thin, lightweight e-reader based on organic transistors. You'll hear how companies are working on ways to combine social networking with TV viewing. You'll learn how Google has adapted its technology in order to keep search returns relevant.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Audible Technology Review, May 2001

    • By: Technology Review
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In "5 New Patents to Watch," the editors pick the patents they believe will transform business and technology. Anyone living on the West Coast in 2001 might pay special attention to the next article. Fuel cells and microturbines could turn almost any consumer into a power-producer. Peter Fairly has the story in "Power to the People." The concept of the computer desktop will someday be a thing of the past. Instead, we'll be looking for other platforms to hold computing power. What will take the place of Windows in this new environment? Claire Tristram explores the possibilities in "Battle for...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2010

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 14 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "The Naked Truth": New findings point to the evolution of human hairlessness. "Better Mileage Now": New upgrades to the internal-combustion engine will enable cars to become more fuel-efficient. ”Fixing the Global Nitrogen Problem": The devastating effects of nitrogen pollution and what the global community must do to decrease its effects. "The Prolific Afterlife of Whales": The carcasses of the largest mammals give life to unique ecosystems.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2004

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This month's cover story takes a look at organic light emitters that can enable better electronic displays. Our second article explores how sound waves powerfully shaped the early universe. Then, in another Cosmology article, we see how leakage of gravity might cause cosmic acceleration.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, July 2003

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The cover story for Audible Scientific American July 2003 looks at how adaptive antenna arrays can vastly improve wireless communications by connecting mobile users with "virtual wires." Also in this issue: new evidence about how cells turn malignant and how cancer spreads, the cost of over-fishing the world's oceans, filling in clues about the lost Indus Valley civilization, and why heart-lung machines can sometimes leave patients wondering why their memory is failing.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Audible Technology Review, August 2009

    • By: Technology Review
    • Narrated by: Todd Mundt
    • Length: 1 hr and 21 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue, you'll learn about a new feature that will enable shuttle astronauts to get out alive in case of a launch emergency. You'll get a few hints as to how Google's new operating system will actually function. You'll learn how a company is trying to bolster online password security by studying the people who are typing in the characters. You'll hear about the alarming security weaknesses in ATMs and what is being done to improve it.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, August 2006

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Scientific American
    • Length: 1 hr and 27 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In the cover story, we'll hear the secrets of the expert mind, and find out how to become good at anything. Also, we'll take a look at the development of a new hypersonic jet engine for space planes, learn about the evolution of mountains, and hear about the ecological relationship between predators, prey, and the forests in which they live.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, August 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This edition includes four fascinating articles. First, the cover story, "Windows on the Mind": You'll learn how tiny flicks of the eyes may reveal subliminal thoughts. Then, the articles "Race in a Bottle", "Predicting Wildfires", and "The Physical Science Behind Climate Change".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 32 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    First, the cover story "A Robot in Every Home" in which Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates predicts that intelligent mobile devices will soon be everywhere. Next, we'll delve into "What is a Planet?", discussing the controversial new official definition which banished Pluto. We'll also hear about the "Evolution of Cancer"...followed by "Better Ways to Target Pain". Finally, we'll explore what it will take for ethanol to pay off as an alternative to gasoline.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, March 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    First, the cover story, Predicting Disease: how antibodies could foretell the future of your health. Next, Diesels Come Clean: thanks to improved engines, exhaust scrubbers, and a new fuel, energy efficient diesels are nearly as green as hybrids. We'll also hear about A Digital Life: new systems may allow people to record all that has touched their lives, creating personal digital archives. Finally, we'll explore the Mapping of the Cancer Genome: crossing the complex landscape of human malignancies.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, December 2000

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 1 min
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Do you believe in the Loch Ness monster? This month's cover article, "Rulers of the Jurassic Seas" reveals an unusually large, prehistoric animal, a swimming reptile to be exact, that is fascinating for many evolutionary reasons. Plus, "The Secrets of Stardust," "Piecing Together Alzheimer's, " the appeal of gold, and more.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, December 2002

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    There are four articles in this month's issue of Audible Scientific American for December 2002. First, Scientific American looks into the melting of Antarctica and assures us that we don't have to panic just yet. Then, an investigation into the enigma of Huntington's disease. Third, the story behind the bright birth of black holes, and, finally, an evolutionary look at the best diet.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, August 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 20 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue of Scientific American, computer modeling and the decoded human genome, machine procreation, ordinary PCs lending helping hands to each other, one doctor's doubts about the link between HIV and AIDS, and more.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, July 2006

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Scientific American
    • Length: 1 hr and 27 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In the cover story, we'll hear about the potential for stem cells to turn malignant. Stem cells are already known to be at the root of a handful of cancers, and might be the cause of many more. Also, we'll hear about some of the greatest achievements of the soon-to-be-retired Hubble space telescope, learn about the advanced color vision system of birds, and hear about the real-life effects of forensics programs like C.S.I.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, October 2006

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Scientific American
    • Length: 1 hr and 20 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    First, we'll hear about How to Blow Up A Star...and how some new models have recently succeeded in reproducing the two main types of supernovae. We'll also hear about viral nanoelectronics: viruses that coat themselves in selected substances and can self-assemble into nano-wires and other devices. Also we'll hear about: Regulatory T-cells...the peacekeepers of the immune systems.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, July 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 16 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This edition includes four articles: First, the cover story: "The Memory Code", about learning to read minds by understanding how brains store experiences. Then, the articles "Warmer Water, Super Hurricanes", "A Malignant Flame", and "An Earth Without People".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, May 2002

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 14 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This month's cover story could be re-named: Everything We Knew About Hardening of the Arteries is Wrong. Atherosclerosis causes chest pain, heart attack and stroke, leading to more deaths every year than cancer. Peter Libby explains "The New View" about this killer disease. Also in this edition of Audible Scientific American for May 2002: scientists are finally preparing to send a spacecraft to Pluto, New York City rethinks its recycling plans, and built in systems to defeat cyberterrorism.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, May 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 49 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue of Scientific American, the cover article, "The Semantic Web," is certain to spark lots of debate; the father of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, along with James Hendler and Ora Lassila, predict the next step in the development of the Web. Plus, the age of the universe ("Rip Van Twinkle"), "The Arctic Oil and Wildlife Refuge," "Warp Drive Underwater," and more.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2002

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 12 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this month's Audible Scientific American, an exclusive story about the first human cloned embryo. Does nuclear now have a better future in light of the US dependence on foreign oil? And, how did first take flight? Fascinating research looks at some clues in modern birds. Plus, why fair play is so important to all of us, even when we prefer to get what we want.

    Regular price: $6.95

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