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    • Scientific American, August 2000

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 18 mins
    • Original Recording
    • Overall
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    Computer models indicate that many diseases will surge as the earth's atmosphere heats up. Signs of the predicted troubles have already begun to appear. Hear about mosquitoes, unhealthy water, and possible solutions in the lead article of this month's Scientific American, "Global Warming: The Hidden Health Risk." Subscribe to this Audible exclusive!

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, December 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
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      4 out of 5 stars 25
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    In the cover story, we'll hear about the possibility that the space-time continuum is a kind of fluid. Then, we'll hear about the incredible memory of Kim Peek, the inspiration for Rain Man. Also, we'll hear about the negative health effects of poverty, as well as take a look at recent fossil discoveries that cast light on the evolution of four-limbed animals from fish.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, April 2002

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 7 mins
    • Highlights
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      3 out of 5 stars 1
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    This month's cover story takes us beyond recent developments in genome research. The next step involves proteins and reporter Carol Ezzell calls Proteomics the "new, new thing" in her story. "Proteins Rule." Also in this edition of Scientific American for May 2002: computer scientists are developing systems to enhance how you view the world, the end of bad breath?, what it costs to go green, and more.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, August 2002

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
    • Highlights
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    In this month's edition of Audible Scientific American for August 2002, the debate over cosmic mass. Modified Newtonian Dynamics is being offered as an alternative to dark matter theory. Marine life may be able to allay global warming. The U.S. must concentrate on defending against the psychological damages of terrorism. Finally, asynchrous chips may mean faster computers.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2002

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 22 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 4
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    In this month's Audible Scientific American, TV as a drug. Researchers see signs in coach potatoes that mimic what they see among serious addicts. Take a look at Saturn: why does it have rings? And, what is the explanation for the rings being flat, on a single plane? Also, hear about the latest advances that make getting wired a home a whole lot easier.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, June 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 29 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 4
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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      5 out of 5 stars 1

    The cover story this month takes a look at suspended animation, and how close we are to making it a reality. Plus, a dissenting look at the side-effects of obesity, the ancient origins of the modern intellect, and chemical companies that attempt to evade government regulations by fabricating scientific uncertainty.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, March 2004

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Highlights
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    This month's cover story takes a two-part look at robots and exploration. The first article tracks NASA's robot rover across Mars' undiscovered terrain. Then, gear up for a grueling robotic race across the Mojave. Next, we delve into the intricacies of the addicted brain. In the fourth article, we explore the skewed logic of the electoral system. Finally, global warming is wreaking havoc on Earth, but swift action could slow the process that humans accelerated.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, December 2009

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      2 out of 5 stars 1
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    "Portrait of a Black Hole": Astronomers will get their first look at the dark silhouettes of these invisible cosmic monsters. "Decoding an Ancient Computer": A complex, ancient Greek mechanism that reveals surprisingly sophisticated technology. "Methane: A Menace Surfaces": What is being done about the emergence of lakes that emit methane - a heat-trapping gas that could dramatically accelerate global warming.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
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     Listen to the February 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, May 2003

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Highlights
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    In this month's Scientific American, a look at parallel universes, exploring the world of synesthesia - where colors come across as musical notes and touching things reveals a taste - to reveal some of the brain's mysteries, reconsidering what we know about the Iceman, and the backlash surrounding the Orphan drug law that allows drug manufacturers to make a profit off drugs designed to treat rare diseases.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, December 2006

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Scientific American
    • Length: 1 hr and 31 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 4
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    First, the cover story about the 3-million, 300-thousand year old baby - and what she means for Human Evolution. Next, we'll delve into the "Scientific American 50 for 2006" with 16 individual profiles of technology leaders.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2009

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 52 mins
    • Highlights
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      4 out of 5 stars 5
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    "Darwin's Living Legacy": A theory that was introduced 150 years ago still drives today's research agenda. "Testing Natural Selection": Natural selection plays a greater role in the evolution of genes than even most evolutionists had previously thought."What Will Become of Homo Sapiens?": What does evolution have in store for our descendants?

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, October 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
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    "Follow the Bouncing Universe": Our universe may have started not with a big bang - but with a big bounce; "Lighting up the Brain": New methods used to control and study the brain activity in animals should lead to a better understanding of how the human brain functions; "Web Science Emerges": Studying the Web will reveal better ways to exploit information, prevent identity theft, revolutionize industry and manage our ever growing online lives.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, April 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 58 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 4
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    "The Color of Plants on Other Worlds", "The Doping Dilemma", "Detecting Nuclear Smuggling", "Regrowing Human Limbs", "Regrowing Human Limbs", and "Carbon Wonderland".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Audible Technology Review, June 2010

    • By: Technology Review
    • Length: 1 hr and 21 mins
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    In this issue, you'll learn how the Gulf disaster exposed overreliance on blowout preventers that have been long disparaged by insiders. You'll hear how Facebook and the Mozilla Foundation are racing each other to own your virtual identity. You'll learn how the advent of touch-based devices could change the behavior of the entire Web. You'll hear how Russian cybercriminals are selling hacked twitter accounts by the thousands.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Audible Technology Review, March 2010

    • By: Technology Review
    • Length: 1 hr and 12 mins
    • Highlights
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      4 out of 5 stars 1
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    In this issue, you'll hear how Twitter plans to become the leader in instant news – and transform itself into a sustainable business. You'll learn how IBM has found a way to turn its mathematicians' innovations into a new source of revenue. You'll hear how a biotechnology company from California has headed to the land of sugar in an effort to change the world for the better.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2006

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Scientific American
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 17
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    This month, we'll hear about inexpensive gene-readers that will soon unlock the secrets in your personal double helix, motherhood's effect on the female brain, a look back at the deadly tsunami of 2004, and the benefits of not testing new chemicals on animals.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Audible Technology Review, February 2010

    • By: Technology Review
    • Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
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    In this issue, you'll hear how wireless carriers are working hard to improve the network - so they can meet the demanding needs of their growing customer base. You'll learn about the Que [Q], Plastic Logics thin, lightweight e-reader based on organic transistors. You'll hear how companies are working on ways to combine social networking with TV viewing. You'll learn how Google has adapted its technology in order to keep search returns relevant.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Audible Technology Review, May 2001

    • By: Technology Review
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    In "5 New Patents to Watch," the editors pick the patents they believe will transform business and technology. Anyone living on the West Coast in 2001 might pay special attention to the next article. Fuel cells and microturbines could turn almost any consumer into a power-producer. Peter Fairly has the story in "Power to the People." The concept of the computer desktop will someday be a thing of the past. Instead, we'll be looking for other platforms to hold computing power. What will take the place of Windows in this new environment? Claire Tristram explores the possibilities in "Battle for...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2010

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 14 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
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    "The Naked Truth": New findings point to the evolution of human hairlessness. "Better Mileage Now": New upgrades to the internal-combustion engine will enable cars to become more fuel-efficient. ”Fixing the Global Nitrogen Problem": The devastating effects of nitrogen pollution and what the global community must do to decrease its effects. "The Prolific Afterlife of Whales": The carcasses of the largest mammals give life to unique ecosystems.

    Regular price: $6.95

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