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    • Scientific American, February 2013

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
    • Highlights
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    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Diet, Health, and the Food Supply

    • Scientific American
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 8
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    There are five fascinating articles in this issue. You'll hear how globalization ushered in a world in which more than a billion people are overfed - even though 800 million still suffer from hunger. Then, learn how to cope with a mountain of conflicting diet advice. Also, find out if books that question the dangers of being overweight are wrong. Then, discover new ways to fight fat. Plus, hear about new approaches to protecting your food from contamination.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, April 2015

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Highlights
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    "Burning Rings of Fire": "Firewalls" of particles may border black holes, confounding both general relativity and quantum mechanics. "Fishing for Billions": How a small group of visionaries are trying to feed China – and save the world’s oceans. "Conquer Yourself, Conquer the World": Self-control is not just a puritanical virtue. It is a key psychological trait that breeds success at work and play – and in overcoming life’s hardships. "How to Survive Cyberwar": Like it or not, we are all combatants in the fight to secure cyberspace.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
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    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
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      3 out of 5 stars 1
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    "Are We Almost Tapped Out?" Scientific American offers a series of stories about the state of the world's water supplies. A freshwater expert explains why clean water is a rare commodity for billions. Even when there is water for drinking, what about having enough for irrigation? Is the era of Edison's light coming to an end? Get the answers to these questions and more...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2015

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Highlights
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      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
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      5 out of 5 stars 3
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      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    "Better Than Earth": Planets quite different from our own may be the best homes for life in the future. "Will We Still Enjoy Pinot Noir?": Winegrowers are trying to preserve the flavor of your favorite reds and whites as climate change alters the compounds in grapes. "In Search of Sunken Treasure": Scientists are using exotic technologies to excavate underwater shipwrecks with the same precision as an archaeological dig. "A Weakness in Bacteria’s Fortress": Evolutionary biologists are trying to attack bacteria in a new way.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Nanotech

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 2
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    In this special issue, Scientific American looks at nanotechnology. What is this science of "small" technology and manipulation at the tiniest scale? What promises does it hold for electronics, robotics, and more? How much of it is hype?

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, June 2009

    • By: Carlos A. Driscoll, Juliet Clutton-Brock, Andrew C. Kitchener, and others
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 16 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 4
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    "Improbable Planets": Astronomers are finding planets where there were not supposed to be any. "The Price of Silent Mutations": Small changes to DNA are proving to be big factors in human diseases, evolution and biotechnology. "The Taming of the Cat": Genetic and archaeological findings suggest wildcats became house cats much earlier - and in a much different place.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, May 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 3
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    "The Chaotic Genesis of Planets", "Science 2.0: Is Open Access Science the Future?", "Regulating Evolution: How Gene Switches Make Life", "Hooked from the First Cigarette", and "Nuclear Fuel Recycling: More Trouble Than It's Worth".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, August 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
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      3.5 out of 5 stars 3
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    "Facing the Freshwater Crisis"; "Why Migraines Strike"; "Bracing for a Solar Superstorm"; "Self-Cleaning Materials"; and "Magnifying Taste".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
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      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
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      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Beyond Einstein

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
    • Highlights
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      3.5 out of 5 stars 3
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    This special edition of Scientific American features seven stories about Albert Einstein and his theories. The articles examine how Einstein's theories changed the world and continue to influence modern science and technology.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, June 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    In this issue: "The Quantum Multiverse": A surprising connection between cosmology and quantum mechanics could unveil the secrets of space and time. "The Messy Truth about Weight Loss": Two decades of research confirm that weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume—but what you eat is more important than how much you exercise.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • August 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    In this issue: "Life Springs": Deep oceans were thought to hold life's origins. New evidence points instead to an active volcanic landscape. "Building a Better Harvest": Scientists are learning to manipulate the complex conversation that plants have with microbes, pests, nutrients, and other elements in hopes of averting a future famine. "Talking to Ourselves": Studies of the conversations people have with themselves open a window on the hidden working of the mind. "Requiem for the Vaquita": What the demise of a small Mexican porpoise tells us about extinction in the 21st century.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • March 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
    • Highlights
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    In this issue: "Near-Light-Speed Mission to Alpha Centauri": A billionaire-funded plan aims to send a probe to another star. "Cancer Killers": Some advanced cancers can now be successfully treated by synthetic immune cells that are more powerful and longer-lasting than any found in the body. "Brain Trust": Poverty may affect the size, shape and functioning of a young child's brain. Would a cash stipend to parents help prevent harm? "Am I Human?": Researchers need new ways to distinguish artificial intelligence from the natural kind.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • July 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
    • Highlights
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    In this issue: "Memory's Intricate Web": A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories. "Black Holes from the Beginning of Time": A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter. "How Cities Could Save Us": Urban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful. "Operation: Diabetes": Surgery that shortens intestines gets rid of the illness, and new evidence shows the gut – not simply insulin – may be responsible.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, May 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
    • Highlights
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    In this issue: "The New Origins of Technology": 3.3-million-year-old artifacts from Kenya upend the classic story of when and how humans became innovators. "Strange News from Another Star": Alien technology is probably not causing Boyajian's star to dim mysteriously. But alternative explanations are hard to come by. "Missing Links": Loss of some DNA during evolution may have helped create big brains and our male-female relationships. "Schizophrenia's Unyielding Mysteries": Gene studies were supposed to reveal the disorder's roots. That didn't happen. Now scientists are broadening the search.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • September 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 18 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 2
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    In this issue: "Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths": The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny. "Is there a 'Female' Brain?": The debate over whether men and women have meaningfully different brains could have profound implications for health and personal identity. "When Sex and Gender Collide": Studies of transgender kids are revealing fascinating insights about gender in the brain. "Not Just for Men": Researchers must dig deeper into gender differences before they can provide better treatments.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, December 2012

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 52 mins
    • Highlights
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
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    "World Changing Ideas": 10 innovations that are radical enough to alter our lives. "Is Drug Research Trustworthy?": The pharmaceutical industry is undermining scientific research. "The Winters of Our Discontent": Why scientists are expecting harsher winters in the U. S. and Europe. "Four Starry Nights": Clues to the Milky Way’s evolution.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, December 2016

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 55 mins
    • Highlights
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    In this issue: "2016 World Changing Ideas": 10 big advances with the potential to solve problems and improve life for all of us. "Solar System Smashup": Our neighborhood of planets was not created slowly, as scientists once thought, but in a speedy blur of high-energy crashes, destruction and rebuilding. "HIV's Achilles Heel": Investigators hope that a three-part protein that mimics a key part of HIV particularly well could lead to a long-awaited vaccine.

    Regular price: $6.95

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