You'll See This Message When It Is Too Late

The Legal and Economic Aftermath of Cybersecurity Breaches
Narrated by: Kate Reading
Length: 14 hrs
4.7 out of 5 stars (24 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Cybersecurity incidents make the news with startling regularity. Each breach - the theft of 145.5 million Americans' information from Equifax, for example, or the Russian government's theft of National Security Agency documents, or the Sony Pictures data dump - makes headlines, inspires panic, instigates lawsuits, and is then forgotten. The cycle of alarm and amnesia continues with the next attack, and the one after that.

In this book, cybersecurity expert Josephine Wolff argues that we shouldn't forget about these incidents, we should investigate their trajectory, from technology flaws to reparations for harm done to their impact on future security measures. We can learn valuable lessons in the aftermath of cybersecurity breaches.

Wolff describes a series of significant cybersecurity incidents between 2005 and 2015, mapping the entire life cycle of each breach in order to identify opportunities for defensive intervention. She outlines three types of motives underlying these attacks - financial gain, espionage, and public humiliation of the victims - that have remained consistent through a decade of cyberattacks, offers examples of each, and analyzes the emergence of different attack patterns. 

The enormous TJX breach in 2006, for instance, set the pattern for a series of payment card fraud incidents that led to identity fraud and extortion; the Chinese army conducted cyberespionage campaigns directed at US-based companies from 2006 to 2014, sparking debate about the distinction between economic and political espionage; and the 2014 breach of the Ashley Madison website was aimed at reputations rather than bank accounts.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Josephine Wolff (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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Best at explaing complex Cyber Security Issues

I enjoyed this audio book form beginning to end, taking very complicated issues and making sense of them. I look forward to more audio works by this author.

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  • 01-19-20

Surprisingly good despite the title

Using detailed case studies this audio book is an analysis of the dynamics of data breaches, defender VS attacker, collective action by stakeholders VS independent entities acting in self interest. Questions of liability in the wake of data breaches are answered through the lens of the case studies. **Ignore the title** of this audio book and buy it anyway. Notwithstanding the silly sensationalist title of this book which doesn't match the high quality of the content, this is a sober analysis that answers the questions it poses. I like the fact this book doesn't suffer a victim complex .... so many books complaining not everyone is doing it right and if only they could have read their book the world would be wonderful... So many authors of business books seem to think if we aren't being constantly told this book will solve world hunger then we won't buy the book. The title must have been written by someone other than the author because clearly it tries to be sensationalist, whereas the author thankfully is clearly rational and knowledgeable. Message to the author: thanks for writing this, found it interesting and helpful, however next time make sure you have the rights to name the title

1 person found this helpful