• When Did White Trash Become the New Normal?

  • A Southern Lady Asks the Impertinent Question
  • By: Charlotte Hays
  • Narrated by: Mary Ann Jacobs
  • Length: 3 hrs and 40 mins
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars (18 ratings)

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When Did White Trash Become the New Normal?  By  cover art

When Did White Trash Become the New Normal?

By: Charlotte Hays
Narrated by: Mary Ann Jacobs
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Publisher's summary

Tattoos. Unwed pregnancy. Giving up on shaving…showering…and employment. These used to be signatures of a trashy individual. Now they’re the new norm. What happened to etiquette, hygiene, and self-restraint? Charlotte Hays, Southern gentlewoman extraordinaire, takes a humorous look at the spread of white trash culture to all levels of American society.

©2013 Charlotte Hays (P)2014 Regnery Publishing

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Interesting but a little extreme for me

I get her point, and mostly agree. However she is someone who beats a dead horse. Her social commentary does bordered on extreme judgment, but that is sort of the point of the book. I think she has a good overall theme, but some of the details are a bit much. After all a true lady is also always gracious.

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