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What I Believe

Narrated by: Billy O'Donovan
Length: 7 hrs and 51 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (15 ratings)
Regular price: $0.94
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Publisher's Summary

Originally published in 1885, "What I Believe" is part of a series of books by novelist Leo Tolstoy that outline his personal interpretation of Christian theology. After a midlife crisis at age 50, he began to believe in the moral teachings of Christianity, while rejecting mysticism and organized religion. He believed that pacifism and poverty were the paths to enlightenment. His precepts of nonviolence even influenced Mohandas Gandhi. Students of religion, political science, and literature alike will gain new understanding from the ideas presented in this book. Students of literature will get to understand more deeply one of the greatest novelist in history, while those interested in religion and politics can see how Tolstoy's philosophy came to influence the world at large.

©2018 Leo Tolstoy (P)2018 Oregan Publishing

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incredible

this book is full wisdom and inspiration. each chapter brings the reader closer and closer to a beautiful truth.

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Recommended for spiritually curious

The performance was clear and pleasant. The story was a rigorous review of faith and church. He claims that based on his extensive knowledge of language that several key biblical passages have been translated incorrectly leading the Orthodox Church to hold beliefs antithetical to Christ's true doctrine and thus why it seems that some ideas of Christianity are inconsistent. He discussed these ideas at length and provides every piece of evidence he has to justify his position. His ideas are worth considering for many reasons but I really learned how imperative proper and careful translation is in the Bible, something I beforehand took for granted. If you're an intellectual Christian and/or a person investigating the faith I recommend this book as one of many to help you think about the faith. An example of Leo's ideas was the topic of murder. At the time the church said killing was OK if it was for a guilty criminal or war. Leo claims with a convincing argument that Christ was radically anti violent and thus no killing is tolerable, hence Christ's doctrine of nonviolence to the point of his own death on a cross. Leo goes into many of the sub dependencies of this interpretation that all tie into a unified doctrine that, if true, would make Christianity much simpler. That too is Leo's point - Christ's doctrine is simple but the church wanted to manipulate it and to do so had to create a bunch of exceptions to the doctrine and then more theology to explain why it was true leading to a convoluted doctrine that no longer maintained a meaningful relationship to Christ's original doctrine.