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Unveiled

Politics, Love, and Obedience in the Middle East
Narrated by: Suzanne Toren
Length: 8 hrs and 26 mins
4 out of 5 stars (8 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The ex-wife of a former high-ranking diplomat, Deborah Kanafani spent many years witnessing the peace efforts between Israel and Palestine. Rather than telling the story of her experiences from a political angle, she offers a glimpse into the human perspective of women in this volatile region.
©2008 Deborah Kanafani (P)2008 Recorded Books

Critic Reviews

"Deborah Kanafani sheds light on a region that remains mysterious today, with an amazing personal journey that brings out the contrasts as well as the similarities between East and West. Her electrifying experiences entertain us, and her unique access to a cloistered world enriches us." (Carlotta Pardini, Ambassador-at-Large, Republic of Panama)

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What this book is really about

Anyone curious about The struggles of women in the Middle East to achieve political and social equality, and who wants to read about the politics of that region in an accessible way with a very human story attached, should find this book interesting. It's also a story about a mother trying to reclaim her children, and since the writer does succeed in doing this, it's satisfying in that way as well. The writing is a remarkable, but it's completely readable. The stories of the ER was the brave women chronicles here really are fascinating, and probably wouldn't be accessible to us Westerners in any other context. You'll notice that the book is missing a few important grounding details – – the writer doesn't allow us to know her son and daughter beyond their names and their identity is her children, so we can't really Connect with them, even though they are at the heart of her reason for being in the Middle East. It's also hard to pinpoint how long she spent we are, and often even the ages of her kids. Still, her activism and adventures and the oral history she takes down of the women she interviews make this book a very worthwhile read.