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Publisher's Summary

Calling T is for Trespass "taut, terrifying, transfixing and terrific," USA Today went on to ask, "What does it take to write 20 novels about the same character and manage to create a fresh, genre-bending novel every time?" It's a question worth pondering. Through 20 excursions into the dark side of the human soul, Sue Grafton has never written the same book twice. And so it is with this, her 21st. Once again, she breaks genre formulas, giving us a twisting, complex, surprise-filled, and totally satisfying thriller.

It's April, 1988, a month before Kinsey Millhone's 38th birthday, and she's alone in her office doing paperwork when a young man arrives unannounced. He has a preppy air about him and looks as if he'd be carded if he tried to buy booze, but Michael Sutton is 27, an unemployed college dropout. Twenty-one years earlier, a four-year-old girl disappeared. A recent reference to her kidnapping has triggered a flood of memories. Sutton now believes he stumbled on her lonely burial when he was six years old. He wants Kinsey's help in locating the child's remains and finding the men who killed her. It's a long shot but he's willing to pay cash up front, and Kinsey agrees to give him one day. As her investigation unfolds, she discovers Michael Sutton has an uneasy relationship with the truth. In essence, he's the boy who cried wolf. Is his current story true or simply one more in a long line of fabrications?

Grafton moves the narrative between the 80s and the 60s, changing points of view, building multiple subplots, and creating memorable characters. Gradually, we see how they all connect. But at the beating center of the novel is Kinsey Millhone, sharp-tongued, observant, a loner-"a heroine," said The New York Times Book Review, "with foibles you can laugh at and faults you can forgive."

Don't miss the other titles in the Kinsey Millhone Alphabet Mystery Series.
©2009 Sue Grafton (P)2009 Random House

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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Sue Grafton Always Delivers!

What made the experience of listening to U Is for Undertow the most enjoyable?

I was able to drive and leave the reading to Judy Kaye - great job.

What other book might you compare U Is for Undertow to and why?

Well, I could compare this to all of Sue Grafton's alphabet series books, but that might be too obvious.

Any additional comments?

I love all of Sue Grafton's books - her style of writing suits me. I enjoyed having the company of the audio book as I traveled by myself for a very long drive.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Great

As always Sue Grafton pulls you in and keeps you reading. Good plot, great characters. And I love Judy Kaye as a reader. She makes Kinsey's character come alive!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Fairly consistent - which is no thrill

Although it contains the usual researched details and depth of character development I did not like the timeline dives. Also the indication of the story line is that the main character is being given more depth by adding history. Yet, in "real time" not much changes, for instance the neighbor should be over 100 by now and I would have preferred the story reflect societal changes and those of her of aging process. On the presentation I did not like that all the young men sounded feminine on purpose. I still enjoyed the story but not as much as I would have liked. I enjoyed it more for old times sake (a familiar character) than the excitement of the new story.

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    5 out of 5 stars

Always enjoy-should have bought unabridged though!

I enjoy all the Sue Grafton stories, but I could kick myself for accidentally ordering "abridged" when I prefer "unabridged" for all her stories.... Like getting the sampler when I meant to order a full meal!