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Publisher's Summary

Ayn Rand’s novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged gave birth to a movement based on her philosophy of objectivism. In The Contested Legacy of Ayn Rand, philosopher David Kelley explains why he broke ranks with orthodox objectivists and created an independent branch of the movement. Originally published in 1990 as a manifesto, the work has been revised as an analysis of the principles of the intellectual collaboration, toleration, and responsibility. It is an engaging introduction to the objectivist movement, its core ideas, and its central fissures. At the same time, it offers a case study in the sociology of intellectual movements and a frank discussion of the issues that arise whenever thinkers leave their studies to promote their ideas in the public realm. 

©2019 David Kelley (P)2019 David Kelley

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Excellent Explanation for Objectivists

Ayn Rand called her philosophy Objectivism. After her death in 1982, the Ayn Rand Institute (ARI) initially carried on a unified Objectivist movement. But in 1992, David Kelley broke away to form the Atlas Society to promote Rand's philosophy in a slightly different way. This book explains Kelley's reasons and includes an update on developments at ARI that have brought the two organization somewhat closer than they were originally. The narration is good except that Scott R. Smith talks a bit faster than I'd prefer and pronounces Rand's first name in two syllables, as if it were "Ion" rather than "ayen." I recommend this title to objectivists who want to learn more about the schism between ARI and the Atlas Society. For non-objectivists interested in learning more about Rand's views, there are many other books on Objectivism that would be preferable.

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great book

i was half-expecting a libertarian screed but was pleasantly surprised. to put this into context: there are some libertarians who i just can't get enough of, e.g. harry brown, and others who i definitely can get enough of, e.g. ayn rand. before hitting the 'buy' button, i was a little afraid that i'd be getting a rehashed objectivist manifesto. but i was pleasantly surprised. this is an engaging and useful work, l liked it so much i even bought the e-book so i could whisper-sync read it. my only reservation is that the world is a lot rougher than the author knows, but we all get there in our own way.