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  • Summary

  • Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
    ©2017 Wondery / Patrick Wyman (P)2017 Wondery / Patrick Wyman
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Episodes
  • Jul 20 2017
    History shapes our world in ways both seen and unseen. In the introductory episode of Tides of History, we explore two major tides - the Fall of Rome and the Rise of the Modern World - and why history matters in the here and now. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
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    19 mins
  • Jul 20 2017
    We take for granted that central governments - sovereign states - are the ultimate political force in the world, but it wasn't always this way. Between 1350 and 1650, this form of government vanquished city-states, town leagues, and smaller lordships to dominate first Europe and then the world. In this episode of Tides of History, we explore how that happened. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
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    44 mins
  • Aug 10 2017
    When we talk about the fall of the Roman Empire, we're only talking about the western half - France, Spain, Italy, North Africa, and Britain. The eastern half of the Roman Empire survived the disastrous fifth century and would last in one form or another until 1453. What was so special about the eastern half of the Roman Empire, and how did it avoid the fate of its western cousin? See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
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    40 mins

Featured Article: The Best History Podcasts of All Time


If you’re a history buff looking for a new podcast to check out, it's easy to get overwhelmed by the array of options available. There are literally thousands of podcasts focusing on every corner of history. To help you know where to start, we’ve waded through nearly everything out there and selected just a few of the best of the best in history podcasts. And we've divided them by categories and interests. You’re sure to find your next favorite listen in our list.

What listeners say about Tides of History (Ad-free)

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For The History lover

I LOVE this podcast. I heard his "Fall of Rome" episode on spotify and became hooked with the show . Patrick conducts an in-depth 60 mins (varies) history of the topic at hand. His discussion is rich in details and color. He breaks down the narratives and analyses the why's in history. A must listen!

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Fantastic

I love this podcast stated by professionals, Patrick is excellent at his knowledge of the middle ages. it is like attended a college class and free of charge.

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Loved it!!

Very informative! Filled in a lot of missing pieces i never knew I was missing. Great podcast, now I am going to listen to the Rome one. Thank you.

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THE BEST

one of the BEST PODCASTS TRULY.
Narrator makes it easy to listen to and enjoyable. Thanks for making all my road trips fun.

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Excellent for history lovers

I discovered these Podcast episodes purely by accident but as the holder of a master's degree in European history I really enjoy the composite composite stories of peoples day-to-day lives backed up by good good academic sources. Narration is excellent.

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Been listening since the beginning

I first started listening to this podcast through the NPR One app, and is definitely my favorite history podcast.

Patrick's theatrical yet objectively factual style of presenting history is truly pleasing on the ears, something not true of most written/read history. His composite characters, while non-real, are not quite fiction, but a clever portal into the everyday lives of everyday people. It allows for the exploration of the set and setting of history at a much finer scale than big-man history.

There is an argument to be made that big-man history is similarly non-real. Yes, the characters technically existed, but are always shaped from the perspective of the historian, and as such, are at best an informed fiction. Because the largest figures in history are often tied to cultural identity, we should not be surprised that these informed fictions are inherently biased.

Patrick's composite characters, while never-existent, lack the celebrity that tarnishes the historical personas of big men, and as such are arguably less biased. They are a clever tool for the historian to explore the nuanced fabric of society -- a personification of society as it existed, integrated from the best understanding history has to offer. In this way they are even bigger than big men.