Thomas Aquinas in 90 Minutes

Narrated by: Robert Whitfield
Length: 1 hr and 21 mins
3.7 out of 5 stars (52 ratings)

Audible Plus

$7.95 a month

Get a preview of our newest plan – unlimited listening to select audiobooks, Audible Originals, and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
$7.95 a month after 30 days. Upgrade or cancel anytime.
Buy for $11.17

Buy for $11.17

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

We see our age as the greatest in human history, filled with seemingly unending originality. Yet such dynamism is not a necessary characteristic of great eras. Among the most long-lasting and stable civilizations was that of medieval Europe. There stasis was achieved, and with it a stability that permitted the development of structured thought and intellectual embellishment of unparalleled degree. Like the vast gothic cathedrals of western Europe, certainties of thought were part and parcel of the medieval age. Its monument of the intellect was the largely static, cumulative philosophy of Scholasticism. And the acknowledged maestro of Scholastic philosophy was Thomas Aquinas.

In Thomas Aquinas in 90 Minutes, Paul Strathern offers a concise, expert account of Aquinas' life and ideas and explains their influence on man's struggle to understand his existence in the world. The book also includes selections from Aquinas' work, a brief list of suggested readings for those who wish to delve deeper, and chronologies that place Aquinas within his own age and in the broader scheme of philosophy.

©1998 Paul Strathern (P)2004 Blackstone Audiobooks

Critic Reviews

"Well-written, clear, and informed, they have a breezy wit about them. I find them hard to stop reading." (The New York Times)

What listeners say about Thomas Aquinas in 90 Minutes

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    16
  • 4 Stars
    17
  • 3 Stars
    10
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    3
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    17
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    9
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    3

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

A mixed bag

I found some interesting information in this account of Thomas Aquinas' life. Well-written and necessarily concise, it provides a good overview of a pivotal character in the evolution of philosophy. The only down side is that the author is much too free with his almost glib appraisals and judgmental comments when a concept seems "ridiculous" to him. It unfortunately takes away the beautiful immersion that can occur when one puts themselves in the place and mindset of the philosopher. It would probably be better for the reader to be familiar with the life and works of Aquinas before reading this book.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

In 90 Minutes Series overview

If you could sum up Thomas Aquinas in 90 Minutes in three words, what would they be?
aka Cliff Notes

Would you recommend Thomas Aquinas in 90 Minutes to your friends? Why or why not?
Yes - I've listened to each book in the series about a major philosopher that is available on Audible. Strathern's books don't have the analytical depth found in Will Durant's "The Story of Philosophy" books, but he does a good job summarizing each philosopher's biography, major philosophical points, and criticisms. Additionally, Strathern's breadth is broader than Durant's in that he covers a greater number of philosophers. I believe that the time spent listening to these books has been well-spent.

My reviews for each book in the series about a philosopher are identical.

What about Robert Whitfield’s performance did you like?
Voice is clear, well-modulated, and easily understood, even at 1 1/2 speed.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Flaming Fag

According to the story told from this book, Thomas Aquinas' mother sent a naked women into his room to help him not become a priest. He pulled a "flaming fag" from the fire and frightened her out of his room. Apparently, according to the author, he wasn't very impressive in appearance. He was very intelligent. The author makes fun of how the Catholic Church gives Thomas Aquinas high marks. Apparently, according to Thomas Aquinas, if you have any questions about the purpose of life, follow the liturgy of the Church and everything will work out in the end. The Catholic Church sent him out to work out problems among those with theological questions until Thomas Aquinas just wore out. The author doesn't seem too impressed with Thomas Aquinas, though among the Christian thinkers, he stand out.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Good information on Thomas Aquinas

This book includes a lot of useful facts about the life of St. Thomas. Parts of it seem vaguely anti-religious.

1 person found this helpful