This Is My God

Narrated by: Aaron Abano
Length: 11 hrs and 51 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (25 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

This Is My God is Herman Wouk's famous introduction to Judaism completely updated and revised with a new chapter, "Israel at 40". A miracle of brevity, it guides listeners through the world's oldest practicing religion with all the power, clarity, and wit of Wouk's celebrated novels.

©1959, 1970, 1974, 1988 The Abe Wouk Foundation Inc. (P)2018 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about This Is My God

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Good explanaing of Judism

Herman Wouks writing and explanation of his God was excellent. There were some draggy parts, but - meh - it was a tedious subject. After reading and listening to all of Wouks works, I was happy to hear this story.

3 people found this helpful

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Must Read for People who want to know God

This is an understandable explanation of the meaning and value of Faith. It should be read several times and then once a year.

You will be enriched!

2 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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good not great.

It's an ok book on modern orthodox Judaism. However a better book to start with is Jewish Literacy by Telushkin. This book seems to focuse on more advanced consepts that a beginner wouldn't understand without more background information that just isn't in this book. Overall 3 stars.

2 people found this helpful

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One of a kind book about Judaism!

This has to be the only book I was kind, where it can introduce someone who knows nothing the basics of Judaism, yet simultaneously inspire an observant Jew to grow spiritually.

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    4 out of 5 stars

Amazingly honest, thoughtful, and well-spoken...

Amazingly honest, thoughtful, and well-spoken, given my stereotype of advocates for orthodox Judaism. The feeling one gets is here is a thoroughly modern, incredibly literate person who happens to have chosen to live like an orthodox Jew, just like someone else might find meaning by doing Civil War enactments.

The writing is first rate, but the reason this book only gets four stars is that it is dated in parts, as Wouk was clearly writing about the period in which he was writing and the present, especially the current state of Judaism, differs in substantial ways from his era. It may be unfair to judge him by a future he couldn't have predicted. But the discrepancy between his observations and the present are sometimes jarring and also annoying when he appears to be making predictions about the future of Judaism in America, and those predictions turn out not quite right.

Wouk writes about Kierkegaard in a way to suggest he doesn't have much respect for Kierkegaard's followers. But Wouk nevertheless comes across to me as a Kierkegaardian knight of faith. I very much doubt Wouk would have agreed with such a characterization, but I believe it aptly explains his otherwise perplexing combination of modernity and religiosity.