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The Wisdom of Life

Narrated by: Ron Welch
Length: 4 hrs and 22 mins
Categories: Classics, Greek & Roman
4.5 out of 5 stars (18 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Written by Arthur Schopenhauer, The Wisdom of Life is an essay from Schopenhauer's last work, Parerga and Paralipomena. Schopenhauer's essay is a detailed description on exploring what human behavior is and what it should be. Schopenhauer also argues the “art” of obtaining the greatest possible pleasure and success in life through the theory of eudaemonology. He takes a unique approach on many important philosophical questions, including whether human life corresponds, or could possibly correspond, to the conception of existence itself. The Wisdom of Life is not only thought-provoking but will leave listeners with important insights on the essence of living.

©2018 Bassett Publishing (P)2018 Bassett Publishing

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My introduction to Schopenhauer...

My favorite part of the audible is when the little dog started barking in the background lol but the performance was on point Ron Welch!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • 4thace
  • Northern California
  • 12-04-18

A quick and focused work

This book takes up the subject of living your best life and what that entails. I was expecting something more morbid and pessimistic but Schopenhauer incorporates a good dose of wry humor as he talks about all the ways people get it wrong when they aim for the ultimate goals in their lives, making this a more easily digestible philosophy book than many others. He is not one of those who is tied up with his reaction to Hegelian dialectic or any other of his predecessors so he does not get bogged down in long-forgotten debates. A reader can also see where he gets this reputation of being influenced by Eastern thought when he does things like mention the Upanishads. I believe he wrote this towards the end of his life, so he is addressing a more mature audience when he talks about leaving a lasting legacy and the durability of fame, which might not be as relevant to a younger reader. He gets especially salty when he talks about how hard it is for someone writing about philosophy to get the respect he may be due, almost certainly due to first-hand experience.
I enjoyed listening to the book, though I think there were a couple of small flaws in pronunciation here and there. The audio medium gave the author's words more personal impact compared to reading words on a page. I would recommend this book for someone who wants to listen to something thoughtful while still accessible to a modern listener.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful