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Publisher's Summary

What exactly are the weird and the eerie? In this new essay, Mark Fisher argues that some of the most haunting and anomalous fiction of the 20th century belongs to these two modes. The weird and the eerie are closely related but distinct modes, each possessing its own distinct properties. Both have often been associated with horror, yet this emphasis overlooks the aching fascination that such texts can exercise. The weird and the eerie both fundamentally concern the outside and the unknown, which are not intrinsically horrifying, even if they are always unsettling.

Perhaps a proper understanding of the human condition requires examination of liminal concepts such as the weird and the eerie.

These two modes will be analysed with reference to the work of authors such as H. P. Lovecraft, H. G. Wells, M. R. James, Christopher Priest, Joan Lindsay, Nigel Kneale, Daphne Du Maurier, Alan Garner, and Margaret Atwood, and films by Stanley Kubrick, Jonathan Glazer, and Christoper Nolan.

©2016 Mark Fisher (P)2019 Watkins Publishing

What listeners say about The Weird and the Eerie

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clear but mispronounced

the narrator gives a clear and fittingly eerie tone, but mispronounces many of the names, which is always a problem, and especially in a critical text

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Beware the Mispronunciation of names!

the criticism here is really strong and interesting. there are places where i want to object to an error or something I see as misconceived. thats high praise for how engaging this is.

However, there are a few places where mispronunciations really start to grate. "Borges" is easily the most coarse. really almost gave up on listening to it during one section.

1 person found this helpful

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highly recommended

I already had the book and was excited to see it on audible. hopefully they bring all of the late Mark Fisher’s books to audible, soon. His views on music, movies, literature are very interesting and deserve a read or listen.

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  • G. Gibson
  • 02-22-20

Fascinating insights

One of the most interesting and insightful analyses of a kind of unnamed genre lying in the interstices of other, better known genres. It's caused me to completely rethink what I do in my own writing and what it is I'm trying to achieve. If you have any interest in the ideas underlying works like Roadside Picnic, Solaris and the films and television shows of Nigel Kneale, you need to read this.