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The Wall Street MBA, Third Edition

Your Personal Crash Course in Corporate Finance
Narrated by: Doug Greene
Length: 7 hrs and 48 mins
Categories: Business, Career Skills
5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Mastering corporate finance is a lot easier than you think.

Business school textbooks are notoriously dry, static, and filled with confusing acronyms. The Wall Street MBA takes a different approach by presenting a succinct “crash course”, breaking down the main concepts of MBA finance and accounting programs to provide the information and insight you need to: 

  • Review financial statements
  • Analyze earnings
  • Detect fraud
  • Value companies
  • Determine the cost of capital 

Fully updated and revised, this new edition will also get you up to speed on important new trends in FinTech, alternative investments, and cost accounting.

This highly accessible ground-floor view of corporate accounting offers everything you need to navigate today’s financial landscape with the knowledge and confidence of a seasoned pro.

©2018 Reuben Advani (P)2018 McGraw-Hill Education

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  • Philo
  • San Diego, CA, United States
  • 06-25-19

Very engaging, for this sort of thing

The book is on a basic level. It covers most of the "greatest hits" concepts, and does it in a way that is entertaining., thought-provoking, and often enough, funny. So it really works as a sort of "spoonful of sugar that helps the medicine go down." It is as close to fun to listen to as any book of this sort I've heard.

It is useful to compare my last listen in this field, "Reading Financial Reports for Dummies," third edition. "Dummies" is longer, more thorough and painstaking on every term, and is pretty much a complete first course in financial accounting, minus the mechanics of putting numbers in actual sheets (though it shows samples of completed corporate financials). This one ranges wider into other financial sub-fields, is shorter, and has stories that are more colorful and punchy. In the finance part, for example (not found in the "Dummies" book beyond a few financial ratios, repeated in this book but better explained here), I, having never taken a formal finance course, was at last treated to a walk-through of various measurements permitting me to grasp valuation models fully, both in their nuts-and-bolts, and conceptually in what each step was doing. Any author-teacher who can get through my own dullness and inertia, and accomplish this, deserve strong praise.

After working through "Dummies," I found this more sprightly approach refreshing and invigorating, sort of brightening me up to the subject again. If any of this seems a fit for you, I say, go for it.

Now if only we could have some more advanced titles like Easterbrook and Fischel's "The Economic Structure of Corporate Law." Well I can dream, right?