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Publisher's Summary

Avoid "Shirtsleeves to Shirtsleeves" by Finding Your Voice.

Growing up in a family with significant wealth or a family business can often feel like an exercise in silence. What should you ask? Whom should you ask? When? Is it ever right to talk about such things? The Voice of the Rising Generation speaks directly to those who find themselves living in that silence, the so-called "next generation". Great wealth or a family business can act like a "black hole", sapping the dreams and aspirations of future generations who feel that they can never measure up to the fortune's founder. This audiobook, by a psychologist, an educator, and a wise counselor who single-handedly changed the landscape of family wealth, diagnoses with economy and precision the cause of entitlement and dependency. It is not too much money or too few chores. It is the failure of rising generations to individuate, that is, to pursue their dreams, develop their resilience, and find their voice. Many books are addressed to parents and grandparents who worry about the effects of wealth on their descendants. Almost alone in the field, this book speaks directly to 20-, 30- and 40-somethings, encouraging them - literally, giving them courage - to meet the challenge of integrating wealth's power into their lives, rather than disappearing into the black hole. Listeners will:

  • Come to understand the true causes of entitlement and dependency
  • Identify the psychological characteristics of the rising generation and the challenges proper to its development
  • Clarify their own dreams, work, and vocation
  • Navigate personal relationships and communication within the context of wealth
  • Recognize the special challenges faced when rising is delayed until mid-life.

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©2014 James E. Hughes Jr., Susan E. Massenzio, and Keith Whitaker (P)2014 Audible Inc.

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  • Marc
  • Scottsdale, AZ United States
  • 07-17-18

a tremendously long monologue for me

I did not find this information to useful for myself. Others might find the section introspection valuable.

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great insight, helpful perspectives

I highly recommend this book for anyone who has received help from their parents or grandparents, financial or otherwise. The concepts, trends and scenarios described here are universal as all of us strives to become successful individuals. These authors help to sort out the true benefits and drawbacks of privilege and, in doing so, provide clear guidelines for everything from coming of age to raising your own children. They make it ok to struggle, no matter your circumstances. They also reinforce your personal responsibility to overcome those struggles and the importance of doing so.

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Lots of fluff

The use of Homer's Odyssey to frame the discussion was the best part of the whole book.
This book would best be suited for those who like to think about their situation, and then continue to think about their situation. There were very few pieces of practical advice. Lots of new age thinking. The authors created their own words which I never enjoy.