adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $24.49

Buy for $24.49

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Mark Slouka’s novel begins with the child of Czech immigrants to the US, now living in New York, who has been brought up on the folklore of his parents’ homeland. As an adult he becomes aware that he has no knowledge of his parents during the Nazi occupation of Prague. He makes a journey back to Czechoslovakia and it is only then that he discovers their part in the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, the notorious ‘butcher of Prague’ and begins to understand his mother Ivana’s unhappiness.

Intertwined with this gripping history is a passionate love story, the tragic consequences of which transcend both years and continents.

©2008 Naxos Audiobooks (P)2008 Naxos Audiobooks

What listeners say about The Visible World

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Fear in Prague

Glen McCready was an ideal narrator for this factually based story of heroes and others in Czechoslovakia in World War II. The novel presents a young man, trying to understand his parents' relationship and their possible support for the Resistance in World War II. There is an ominous, almost menacing tone to McCready's narration, as the young man gets closer to his parents' history. Among the livelier scenes were those from the protagonist's boyhood in the US, surrounded by emigres from the postwar Czech world, so many trying to understand what had happened to their lost world. But there is a heaviness, too, as the book confronts the horrors of the war and the suffering of these sometimes sentimental emigres. Very well written and read.

2 people found this helpful