• The Virtues of Peace: Excavating the Virtues of the Untold Stories of the Peace through Law Movement

  • By: The Virtues of Peace
  • Summary

  • This show draws attention to ideas and personalities - the virtues and moral energies - of the Peace Through Law movement that, unfortunately, remains largely unknown to the public. Our show was launched on the historic day of May 18, 2020. Prior to the U.S. entry into World War I (April 6, 1917), May 18 was widely celebrated in the U.S. as "Peace Day" as it marked the opening day of the 1899 Hague Peace Conference — a watershed moment of the Peace through Law Movement. It was at the 1899 Hague Peace Conference when the process of building international institutions aimed at the non-violent resolution of conflicts began. This accomplishment was a direct outgrowth of the Peace through Law Movement and the advocacy of individuals, many of them women such as Cora di Brazzà and Bertha von Suttner, who did not have a formal political voice, but were footsoldiers of the movement. Cora di Brazzà (1860-1944) believed that the cornerstone of Peace was not an international institution such as an international Court of Law (though that was indeed necessary). Rather, like Plato, Cora di Brazzà believed that a certain kind of "harmony of the soul" was primary. For her, "Peace through Law" begins with promulgating and obeying an "inner law." As she put it, "one begins with the germ," i.e., with the individual conscience and developing a habit for respecting the Golden Rule and other "Rules of Harmony." Accordingly, Cora di Brazzà developed a sophisticated system of Peace Education in line with this understanding of peace. You can learn about that system and other ideas/personalities involved in the "Peace Through Law" movement in this podcast.
    The Cora di Brazzà Foundation
    Show more Show less
Episodes
  • Forward Into Memory: Korea's March 1st Movement and The Red Thread of Peace History

    Mar 1 2021

    March 1st is a sacred day in Korea as it marks the moment when, in 1919, citizens throughout the peninsula organized a widespread non-violent and democratic uprising against their colonizers, imperial Japan. Long before the division of the country into "North" and "South," citizens from Pyonyang to Seoul to Cheonan, participated in the March 1st Movement. In this show, which marks the 102nd anniversary of the March 1st Movement, we examine the Movement through a narrative that transcends the typical interpretation of the Movement as a nationalist, anti-Japanese Movement for Korean Independence. Moving beyond the description of the Movement as one for "independence" and "self-determination," we discuss the March 1st Movement within the deeper context of the international Peace through Law Movement. Viewed as a moment in the larger "Red Thread" of Peace-through-Law, we discuss how the Movement was timed with the "organization of the world" and the development of international justice in the aftermath of World War 1, and focus on some of the key ideas - such as reconciliation - expressed in the March 1st 1919 Declaration. We also discuss some of the morally energetic individuals involved in the 3.1 Movement.

    Show more Show less
    Less than 1 minute
  • Forward Into Light (Part 2): Sandra Weber discusses Adelaide Johnson's Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton on the 100th anniversary of its unveiling

    Feb 15 2021

    One hundred years ago today, an important monument to the women's equality movement was unveiled in the U.S. Capitol. On February 15, 1921, Susan B. Anthony's 101st birthday, the suffrage statue titled "Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton" was unveiled in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol in a ceremony of great beauty and dignity. 100 years later, on the centenary of this event, we are once again honored to be joined by special guest Sandra Weber, the foremost expert on the Portrait Monument, and author of The Woman Suffrage Statue: A History of Adelaide Johnson's Portrait Monument at the United States Capitol (2016 McFarland). This conversation is Part 2 of a two part series with Weber devoted to unlocking the stories surrounding the Portrait Monument. In this installment, Weber shares the incredible story of the statue - from its connection to earlier statues sculpted by Adelaide Johnson in the late 1800s, to the many obstacles faced by Johnson in realizing her vision. Learn about the meaning and significance of Johnson's beautiful and mysterious work of art and the treasure-trove of stories to which it is connected.

    Show more Show less
    1 hr and 43 mins
  • Forward Into Light (Part 1): A Conversation with Sandra Weber on researching Adelaide Johnson's Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton

    Feb 11 2021
    This conversation is Part I of a two part series devoted to unlocking the stories surrounding a statue that was unveiled on February 15, 1921 - the 101st birthday of Susan. B. Anthony. Years in the making, the Portrait Monument was a labor of love for the "sculptress of the suffrage movement," Adelaide Johnson (1859-1955). Special guest Sandra Weber, author of The Woman Suffrage Statue: A History of Adelaide Johnson's Portrait Monument at the United States Capitol (2016 McFarland) and the foremost expert on the statue, joins us for this special mini series. In 2012 Weber was awarded a Capitol Historical Society Fellowship to study the Portrait Monument. She consulted numerous archives - not only Adelaide Johnson's papers, but also the archives of the Architect of the Capitol - who oversaw the placement of the statue in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol - and then subsequently to the crypt. Join us to learn about Weber's journey in unearthing numerous treasure-stories connected to the statue and to women's history on the 100th anniversary of the statue's unveiling. We also focus on Susan B Anthony (1820-1906) who as we will learn, played an invaluable role in the creation of the Portrait Monument that was unveiled 15 years after her death, and on her 101st birthday.
    Show more Show less
    1 hr and 22 mins

What listeners say about The Virtues of Peace: Excavating the Virtues of the Untold Stories of the Peace through Law Movement

Average Customer Ratings

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.