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The Trial of Socrates

Narrated by: Rufus Fears
Length: 29 mins
4 out of 5 stars (81 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

In his funeral oration, Pericles celebrates the Athenian democracy for its tolerance. The Athenians treasure freedom of speech as essential to true democracy. Yet this same Athenian democracy puts to death its greatest thinker and teacher, Socrates. Why?
©2001 The Great Courses (P)2001 The Great Courses

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Logic to the endgame

a short intro course that, if you know only that Socrates committed suicide and nothing more, take a half-hour and listen to Prof. Fears explain how and why Socrates willingly submitted to this trial. A good capsule to a historic event.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Fantastic and short.

I still remember this, even months after having listened. It's interesting, and for the open minded listener, it's an introduction to Socratic debate, i.e the use of questions to make a point.

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Very interesting

I thought the topic of discussion was a valuable one which is why I finished. The performer did and ok job performing this lecture, but I wasn’t all too captured like I thought I’d be. It’s an interesting read, but only if you have time to focus on the content. Otherwise you may lose track of what’s happening and therefore lose interest quickly.