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The Three Taps

Narrated by: Barnaby Edwards
Length: 7 hrs and 13 mins
3.5 out of 5 stars (15 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The Three Taps is the first of Ronald Knox’s detective stories to feature private investigator Miles Bredon. In this case, Miles is sent by his employer - the appropriately named Incredible Insurance Company - to investigate the death of Mr. Mottram, who recently took out one of their so-called Euthanasia policies.

The victim was clearly gassed; but whether it was an accident or planned is a matter for some debate. While Miles focuses on suicide, his old wartime colleague Inspector Leyland feels that murder is more likely, so the two men - ably assisted by Miles’ wife Angela - puzzle out the problem together.

©2012 Ronald Knox (P)2012 Audible Ltd

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Profile Image for Mark H
  • Mark H
  • 10-27-13

Too pedantic and stylised for me.

I bought this book based upon the reviews that I read here. I like murder mysteries that have good plot and good characterisation and I am fairly open to different styles, settings and contexts, so I thought that I would take a risk and buy the download. It could have been like Dorothy L. Sayers or Agatha Christie… but it was not. I listened to about half of the story, but it was just not for me and I do not expect to finish it.

I had not come across Knox before and I was intrigued to discover whether the book was written by a modern author, harking back to bygone days, or one who was writing in the early part of the twentieth century. So, I looked up Ronald Knox on the Internet. I discovered he was born in 1888 and from a fairly privileged background. He became an
academic/churchman and had wide-ranging interests. He published many works on a range of topics. The Wikipedia entry alone has tempted me to read a biography about him. However, in this book I found Knox’s prose rather pedantic, convoluted and of its time. The novel clearly has merit, but it is just not for me. I recommend that you listen to a sample before buying.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for Paul Cook
  • Paul Cook
  • 05-20-19

A mystery that has you guessing at everything

Detective fiction follows a well-known formula, but this book will have us questioning not just "who dunnit" but that formula itself. Whether the death was an accident, suicide or murder is as much of a question as the usual whose, hows and whys.
The lively and memorable series protagonists are efficiently introduced. Which of them is 'the detective,' if any of them are, or if only one is, are another thing that'll keep you guessing. Not that it's all questions as it throws loads of answers at you. A lot of fourth wall breaking that feels much more modern than the book has a right to occurs, with the author speaking to the audience trough his characters.