Regular price: $24.95

Membership details Membership details
  • 30 days of membership free, plus 1 audiobook and 2 Audible Originals to get you started.
  • After trial, you'll get 3 titles each month: 1 audiobook and 2 Audible Originals of your choice.
  • Don't like your audiobook? Swap it for free.
  • Cancel anytime and keep your audiobooks.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
  • Get access to the Member Daily Deal
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Written in 1759 by Scottish philosopher and political economist Adam Smith, The Theory of Moral Sentiments provides much of the foundation for the ideas in his later works, most notably in The Wealth of Nations

Through this initial text, Smith expresses his general system of morals, exploring the propriety of action, reward and punishment, sense of duty, and the effect of numerous factors on moral sentiment. In so doing, Smith devised innovative theories on virtues, conscience, and moral judgment that are still relevant and accessible today. Though somewhat surprising to find a philosopher of Smith's abilities discussing aspects such as luck and sympathy and how they affect self-image or relationships, The Theory of Moral Sentiments never loses its critical excellence in its good-natured understanding of the human exploration for the meaning of being good.

Public Domain (P)2018 BN Publishing

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Thorough Philosophic Treatise

Adam Smith presents a very thorough overview of the ideology of moral sentiment. The acuteness and clarity of his understanding of the subject is very admirable.

John Clickman did a reasonably good job reading the text. But as with any literature or verbiage originating from a British source, the American understanding of nuanced words are occasionally lost. In summary, a British reader/performer would have been a better choice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful