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The Stasi: The History and Legacy of East Germany’s Secret Police Agency

Narrated by: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
Categories: History, European
4.5 out of 5 stars (8 ratings)

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Profile Image for Janet Lamb
  • Janet Lamb
  • 10-14-18

Quick & Informative

I gave it 5, because though there more in depth books,like the one by Jens Gieseke, they may be for some, very hard to digest. This gives a good overview from beginning to end of the GDR. Also this is such recent history that I have no doubt there is still lots more to come. It also answers questions that are still relevant in German politics today. It seems that extreme political views of either left or right feed off each other, and the tendency of we tried communism so we will head so far right till we cant see the left anymore and vice-versa.

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Profile Image for Dan Rose
  • Dan Rose
  • 05-31-18

A missed opportunity

The Stasi played a key role in the suppression of GDR population during the life of the East German State.  At one time the Stasi could rely on  informants, numbering 1 in 6.  They held files on most of the population. Charles River Editors book should be applauded because this is the first audiobook I have come across, which gives a brief history of the Stasi.  Sadly, though I would say that this book gives only the briefest of introductions to the work and the wider effects of the Stasi, and in my view an opportunity has been missed, especially considering there are a number of excellent books on the subject.  I would  also say that the narration is a little wooden